The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-456 – Destination Marathons

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4456.mp3]
Link epi4456.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Chris’ other show à https://shows.acast.com/after-the-apocalypse

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-456 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Today we have a conversation with Mark Janik who leads a travel company called Destination Marathons.  I thought it would be cool to talk to Mark as we come out of lockdown.  I think we are going to see a big surge in destination races as people revenge buy from being couped up so long. 

That’s an actual term being used now: “Revenge Travel”.

In section one I’m going to talk about a successful, little nutrition experiment I did last week.  In section two I’m going to give you a different, maybe new, hopefully helpful view on how to deal with difficult work situations. 

As I look out my office window it is full on summer.  The green of greens has descended on everything.  It is always amazing to me the unbridled enthusiasm of the New England summer after 8 months of cold.  It’s really something.  

The tree pollen is very high.  There is a layer of yellow dust on everything.  Makes it hard to breath. 

Well – I went for my follow up with the knee doctor and he gave me the green light to start running again.  I started out with a mile around the athletic fields, then jumped up to a 5K in my neighborhood.  Neither of which will be inspiring any move scripts. 

I am slow, weak and heavy. 

I then showed up for my club run on Sunday morning.  I told them I might be able to eke out 4 miles easy.  They said ‘no issues just come with us’.  Ollie and I ended running 8 miles with them.   

I have to be honest I was struggling at the end.  Not because my knee hurt. Because I’m in terrible shape.  I found it to be fitting karma because I was always known as the guy who scared off the new members. 

But the knee does still hurt. 

Specifically when climbing hills.  There’s a spot where I get a stabbing pain when I toe off.  I’ve decided to keep trying to get out 3 times a week for 40 minutes or so but stick to the flats and keep it slow.  I’m still riding my bike on the off days too.

The Doctor wants to give it some more time and look at it again in July.  He’s no help. 

Not a lot of good news I’m afraid.  I’m going to have to figure out how much of my race calendar to scrap in the fall.  It’s all a bit disheartening.  I feel like the walls are closing in. 

But I will eke it out.

Isn’t that a funny little word? Eke?  This word is e-k-e, not eek, e-e-k.  Eek is an interjection of being startled, like “eek, a mouse!”  No, eke, is a good old Anglo Saxon word that originally meant to supplement or add to.  Like “He would eke his emu farming income with some freelance needlepoint.”

We use it today to mean more of a sense of struggling to get by with just enough. 

First usage of eke is traced by the Oxford English Dictionary, that grand old dame of word books, to 1596, so a late Elizabethan word for you to try in a sentence.  See if you can eke it out.

Ollie is doing fine, but I’m going to have to get some help with him.  He has some behavior issues and hasn’t learned his basic, life-saving commands.  He’ll come when called but only when it’s convenient for him.   I can’t let him off leash in the woods because of all the traffic, especially the horses. 

I’m perfectly ok with keeping him on leash.  If he doesn’t respond to voice commands then it would be irresponsible and potentially dangerous to let him off leash. 

The challenge I have is that having him on leash, especially when I’m already struggling to run.  It’s hard.  And frankly, no fun. Even in the harness he tries to drag me at the worst moments and throws off my balance.  It’s exhausting.  I feel like we’re constantly fighting. 

So I’m casting about for some professional help to get some control over him.  One option I have is to send him off for a 3-week deep training session, where he basically goes away and comes back trained.  I would love that option, but up where I live it would cost me the better part of $4,000 dollars.  I’m almost at the point where that seems worth it. 

Other than that he’s an absolute sweetheart.  He’s loving and energetic.  It’s not like he’s tearing the furniture up, he just needs to get some training and unlearn some bad habits. 

I had him in for a grooming appointment today, so he smells good too. 

I see that a lot of races are running this summer.  I got an email from the Hyannis triathlon this morning.  I also saw that they’re planning to run the Peach Tree on the 4th of July. 

Let us know what your plans are.  I have to see how I recover before I make any big plans. 

Remember our talk with Dr. Sarb Johal back in April about how to mentally survive the apocalypse?  Well he’s killing it.  He had the most popular post on Psychology Today magazine last week.  He has a new book out on how to get good sleep in the apocalypse.  He’s coined a new phrase Coronasomnia. 

I read an interesting article this week about how most people really only have 4-5 good hours of work in them a day.  The key is to realize that you can only do good work some of the time and the rest of the time you’re not going to be as effective or efficient.  The challenge then is how to schedule the important work into the times when you are manifesting your best self. 

Something to think about!

On with the show!

 

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – 24 Hour Fast - http://runrunlive.com/how-to-a-24-hour-fast

Voices of reason – the conversation

Mark Janik – Destination Marathons

https://www.destination-marathons.com/


Destination Marathons was started by Mark Janik in 2018 after a 30 year career with Merck. Being a runner himself he knew about all the hassles runners face preparing for race weekends and he started Destination Marathons to create a much better, stress free weekend so runners can have a great time.

The company is based in Charlotte, NC and completed 7 race weekends before the pandemic including the Boston Marathon. NYC Marathon, Marine Corps Marathon, Kiawah Island Marathon, Publix Atlanta Marathon/US Olympic Trials, and Wilmington Marathon. Destination Marathons became an official tour operator for the Berlin Marathon and is recognized as an official travel agency with their IATAN certification.

The company provides ideal race weekend accommodations, pre race pasta dinners, gear check, post race celebrations, massage therapists and if needed race day transportation. There are always on site hosts to make sure everything goes smoothly. They will do “everything but run for you”.

Future trips include Grandmas Marathon in Duluth, Boston, Berlin, and Disney Marathon Weekend. They are a team of experienced runners who will provide excellent service and create opportunities so their guests can connect and achieve their best.

https://www.destination-marathons.com/

It began with "The Horse"

I (Mark Janik) have been a runner since my junior high school days in Michigan. In those days, they called me “The Horse” on my track team. Since then, I’ve been an avid runner and have always loved to travel. After retiring from Merck following a 30 year career in sales I decided to start my own runners travel company. Having run over 35 marathons and half marathons I knew first hand how difficult it was to find a hotel in a city where thousands of other runners are all looking for the ideal place to stay. I knew how difficult it was to try and get a reservation for several friends at an Italian restaurant the night before and I knew how hard it was to connect with other runner friends who were in town for the same race but staying in a different location.

 The reason I started Destination Marathons was to create a much better experience for runners. A hassle free, worry free weekend where they can focus on having a great time. We design stress free trips for runners so our guests can connect and achieve their best. 

Hi Chris,

If you haven’t already please take a deep look on our website to see our story, the charities we support and our blog.

https://www.destination-marathons.com/ourstory/

Take a look at the reviews prior guests have given us both on our FB business page and at our Google Business Account:

https://www.google.com/search?q=destination%20marathons&tbm=

The largest running club in Charlotte called Charlotte Running Club has profiled us at least three times and they have been a great partner. Here is the review that Club President Chad Champion wrote about after our very first trip.

https://myemail.constantcontact.com/Charlotte-Running-Club-Newsletter---March-2019.html?soid=1109987088548&aid=LiZpblFbPZw


Talk to you tomorrow (Wed at 7 pm Eastern)

Thanks!

Section two – Turnin g difficult work situations to your advantage - http://runrunlive.com/dealing-with-difficult-people-and-situations-at-work

 

Outro

 

Ok my friends we have traveled to run the end of episode 4-456 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  And a good time was had by all.

It’s going to hit 90 Farnheit today here.  I got out early on the rail trail with Ollie and ran about 40 minutes. It was hard and hot.  It takes about ten minutes for him to calm down enough to run with me. 

I got out pretty early, but everyone else had the same idea and the rail trail was packed.  I had to keep Ollie close, which he’s not good at.  That’s my schedule as of today.  I bike 3-4 days a week and try to run 40 minutes or so 3 times a week. 

The knee will only let me run on flat, even surfaces.  There aren’t many of those where I live.  I went out in the trails behind my house Tuesday and it was too hilly, the knee wouldn’t let me do it.  I had to hike home.  I went out on a flatter trail on Thursday, without Ollie, and it was ok but I still had trouble with the roots. So it’s the rail trail or the track for me. 

I asked the Knee Dr. about getting some PT but he wasn’t willing to prescribe that. I’m going to have to look and see if I can’t find a 30-day knee stabilization and strengthening routine I can do on my own. 

It’s not much, but it’s something.  I feel a bit like I’m in full on retreat from the fitness lifestyle.  But, I’ll keep looking for that break in the clouds, that ray of sunshine, where I can put my head down and run hard towards the freedom of it.

And when that time comes.

I’ll see you out there.

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4456.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 3:10pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-455 – Zach Strolls to a Record in Tenn   

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4455.mp3]
Link epi4455.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Chris’ other show à https://shows.acast.com/after-the-apocalypse

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-455 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

We’ve got a great chat with Zach today.  He’s a runner from Kentucky and is fresh off breaking the record at the Strolling Jim 40 miler that had stood for 30 or so years.  

In section one we’ll talk about socks.  In section two I’m going to talk you through some tips for presenting yourself on video calls. 

All in all a compelling and interesting package for you. 

This week I go back to the Knee Dr. to have my follow up appointment.  I’m excited.  There is still a little pain in the left knee where the stress fracture is when I put weight on it at certain angles.  I haven’t run for a full 3 months now, really. 

I’ve been riding my bike a little but mostly taking it easy.  And I can feel it. I’ve had to go on a diet because I was putting on weight so fast.  Some of my pants just don’t fit anymore.  I’m a good 15 pounds heavier than I want to be and, especially with the weather getting hot, it’s uncomfortable. 

I suspect the doctor is going to be overly conservative, like they always are.  And I’m going to be overly aggressive, like I always am.  So maybe we’ll be able to meet in the middle as I start spinning up some running.

I sure do miss it. 

I heard a great metaphor this week.  The leaky boat metaphor. 

I was talking to someone who had spent a lot of time in the navy.  He said he had been on two boats.  The first one was an old boat.  And they spent all their time fixing holes and painting and scraping and all sorts of other maintenance tasks to keep the old boat running. 

But he had also served on a new boat and they hadn’t needed o do any of that.  The boat was new and required very little maintenance activity. 

So I figure my old body is like the leaky boat.  If I want to keep it operational I’m going to have to keep doing constant maintenance. 

What do you think?  Good Metaphor? 

I’ve managed to sneak in some yoga but my flexibility is crap right now and my core strength is crap.  So, yeah, I’m in a great spot; fat, weak and out of shape.  Best place to start is at the bottom, right? 

As I start to work some running in I’m going to have to ease into it.  I need to balance the running with biking and some strength.  I’ve had good luck with triathlon training in situations like this in the past. 

I don’t really want to compete in a triathlon, but it’s a great training methodology to give you fitness and core strength without too much pounding. 

I’ll probably have to join a gym now that the apocalypse is winding down in my part of the world.  I just don’t have the set up to do this stuff in my house.  Plus I’d be able to get some swimming in, if I want to work that into my schedule. 

I have to decide if I want to do it myself or get coaching.  We’ll see.  I’m ready. 

With all this time working from home I did manage to get my garden started.  There’s nothing better than fresh veggies off the vine in the summer. 

Ollie is not happy with me.  I still manage to get at least one walk with him in every day.  Usually a mile.  I’m having to keep him on the leash because the horses are out in my woods all the time and I don’t want to have an incident.  Ollie is not trained well and very unpredictable.  I’m sure he misses running. 

So what are all of you youngsters up to?  Having plans for the summer?  Getting back to racing? 

It’s up to you.  You can write your own story. 

On with the show. 

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – Socks - http://runrunlive.com/socks

Voices of reason – the conversation

Zach Beavin – Breaking the Strolling Jim Record

Hey Chris, 

Thanks for taking the time to have me on today! I've attached a couple photos here for you to use/choose. 

 

Zack Summary: 

 

Zack is an up and coming ultra runner based in Lexington, KY. He qualify and competed in the 2020 US Olympic Marathon Trials (2:18:26), has run the US #4 All-Time 50 mile time (5:03:06), and this spring broke a 30 year-old course record at Strolling Jim 40 miler that was widely considered to be one of the most untouchable records in ultra running. He works as the footwear buyer and Race Director at John's Run/Walk Shop after retiring from his engineering career on day 4. In addition to running, Zack purports to be a bourbon and PopTart aficionado. 

 

Links: Race ReportInstagramTwitterStravaStrolling Jim History

 

Thanks again! 

Zack 

Section two – Video Calls - http://runrunlive.com/executive-presence-on-video-calls

 

Outro

 

Ok my friends we have run more than 40 miles through the rolling Tennessee hills to a record finish at the end of episode 4-455 of the  RunRunLive Podcast.  That was fun. 

I watched the Runaways movie on Netflix this week.  This is the remake of Cheri Currie’s novel “Neon Angel” that I read a few years back.  The runaways were an all-girl rock band in the 70’s that had a hit with “Cherry Bomb”.  Kristen Stewart does a great job playing Joan Jett and Dakota Fanning is Cherry Currie.  They don’t have much Lita Ford in the movie. 

I had been waiting for the movie to become available.  It had not been for a while.  But now it’s on Netflix. 

I won’t spoil it for you, but it was all the gross, sweaty, druggy stuff of the 1970’s wrapped in that Las Angeles rock and roll thing.  Worth a watch.  If you think about the fact that these were 15 year old girls it’s surreal. 

I was alive back then and it was sweaty, druggy and gross. 

Apologies for not having any exciting stories to tell you this week.  It’s hard when you are stuck in the house every day!  I’m still bashing my way through the first season on my serial apocalypse podcast project.  We’re up to 16 episodes.  I think I’m going to end season one at 20 episodes, take those and bake them into a book and an audio book. 

I’ve got about 8,000 downloads now, so it’s slowly growing.  But the thing about these types of properties is that they are evergreen – they last forever.  Slowly but surely.  I’m going to move towards retirement over the next couple years and writing would be a great hobby as long as I’m not funding it. 

This weeks show has been brought to you by 3 long time members.  Let me tell you a little bit about them.

First we have Craig.  Craig recently went on an adventure involving trolls and unicorns in the fairy land of ungbuttollop.  Therre he interacted with an evil snow queen and saved a princess, well, actually, that’s not allowed anymore, he helped a princess save herself and they lived happily ever after.  And something about candy canes was involved too.

Next is Lewis who is a mechanic for a professional race car team.  He spends his days splattered in motor oils and nursing bloody knuckles from having rapidly fixed a head gasket with a torque wrench in the Daytona 500. 

And finally we have Cliff who runs a tiki bar on a tropical island in the South Pacific called the Bali Hai, where he dishes out sweet drinks with little umbrellas in coconut shell to tourists while secretly gathering information for M5. 

RunRunLive Members lead interesting lives. 

You should try it. 

And I’ll see you out there.

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4455.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 4:55pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-454 – Ken Runs Ohio   

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4454.mp3]
Link epi4454.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Chris’ other show à https://shows.acast.com/after-the-apocalypse

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-454 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Happy Mother’s Day!  How are all my moms?  I know how you are. Sick of it! Your carried them for 9 months, they beat the crap out of your body, you carried them around for another decade and now what?  No flowers?  Ungrateful so and so’s!

Ollie and I drove over and visited my Mom today, brought her some flowers.  I was up early because I went to get my second and final Moderna chip implanted today.  Anybody know how to link that to Strava? 

I feel fine, by the way, thanks for asking.  I might have overindulged in IPA last night binge watching season 5 of The Expanse, so, really don’t know if the shot made me feel hungover.

I’m still on the shelf.  People keep asking me ‘how’s the knee feel?’ And I honestly can’t really tell.  I get some pain in there using it sometime but I’m not sure if that’s the stress fracture or just old-man pain. It’s a broken bone.  All I can do is stay off it and wait for it to heal. 

Not this week, but next week will be 3 months and my follow up with the knee doctor.

I’ve been walking the dog and riding my bikes.  And this week I started working in some homegrown PT to strengthen the knees. 

We’ll see what happens.  Like I said, all I can really do is wait. 

The next big challenge for me is going to be slowly easing back in and not breaking myself through enthusiasm. 

This week we chat with Ken who’s working on an apocalypse running project to run every county in Ohio.  It’s funny how we itinerant runners make stuff up to stay in the game, right?

In section one I will talk about how hot weather impacts nutrition and some tips to deal with it.  In section two I’ll review a course I took on empathy this week. 

I miss running.  Especially in this nice spring weather.  I dreamt about trail running this week.

Seriously. 

There I was on a warm afternoon cruising down a swoopy, pine needle trail in the woods, just flying and feeling that runner’s high. I was very happy. 

I often dig up quotes to voice what I think will help people.  It’s practicing social proof or 3rd party authority.  If I were to just pop up and say “Hey!  Hey you! You should think about what you say instead of just yelling all the time.”  People would say, hey who the hell are you to tell me such a thing?  Mind your own dang business. 

But if I were to publish a quote and just leave it out there people will like it and say thank you.  Even though the sentiment is the same. 

For example:

“Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.”

― Rumi

So – a Persian Sufi Poet from Afghanistan from the 13th century has more contextual authority than I do. 

Think about that. 

But, I am the messenger. 

You can be the messenger.

On with the show!

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – Hot weather nutrition - http://runrunlive.com/nutrition-in-hot-weather

 

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Ken Ludt – Running Ohio

Ken Ludt is a mid pack runner looking for ways to keep the joy in running while in denial of middle age. Born and raised in California, he's lived in Japan followed by 25 years in Australia and currently living in Ohio with his patient wife and two fur ball dogs. 

 

Section two – Empathy - http://runrunlive.com/empathy-at-work

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have run from Cleveland to Cincinnati to the end of episode 4-454 of the  RunRunLive Podcast.  I wonder how many people in Cincinnati could tell you who Cincinnatus was?  

But, of course, because I’m that guy, I’ll tell you.  Cincinnatus was a Roman politician and military leader early on in Roman history, way back before the empire, before Alexander the Great, born in 519 BC, Rome was just a city at that point. 

Stick with me. 

This was when there was no standing army, and Rome was a republic.  When they got in trouble Rome would promote someone to dictator to get stuff done.  Cincinnatus got appointed to Dictator twice.  The dictator was when the senate couldn’t get stuff done fast enough. 

But famously Cincinnatus could have parlayed that dictatorship into a kingship, but he didn’t, he retired to his farm.  (He didn’t grow cabbages, that was Diocletian). So, you see, Cincinnatus is a metaphor for public service, and selfless service to the republic.  That’s why when you hear someone called a modern-day Cincinnatus, what they are saying is that person put public service above themselves. 

History lesson over.  Can’t help myself.  Sorry. 

Took Ollie Wollie for a nice long walk today up around my old prep school in Groton.  I was trying to walk the old cross-country course, but I think they’ve changed it.  Ollie was hot, but it tired him out. 

I think our course was like 2 miles. In the prep league there was no consistency in the cross-country courses.  None of them were 5K – they were all short.  Some had obstacles you had to navigate like a steeplechase.  But, it’s pretty over there on campus this time of year.

Did I tell you about my greenhouse?  I made a little hothouse this year to keep my baby vegetables in.  With the apocalypse the veggies are going sell out before it’s time to plant.  So you can either plant early which kills the plants or not get what you want. 

But with my little hothouse I can sprout seeds and keep the herbs and veggies alive and happy for a couple weeks until it’s time to plant.  It works great.  The only issue I have is some of these windy or stormy days it threatens to blow away. 

I see people are back out racing in person.  I’m getting lots of emails from races exuberantly celebrating their comeback events. 

Did you see the postponed Boston Marathon had its registration last week.  It turned out that you would need to beat the qualifying time by 7:47 to get in.  For me that would be a 3:27 or better.  I haven’t run that time since 2010.  I already signed up for the virtual, so I won’t be running in Hopkinton. 

But, we’ll see, I might go jump in to pace someone if they want the company. The fire station in to the finish line is a nice segment. 

So that’s it.  I’m fully vaccinated.  I’m nearing the end of my running purgatory period with the stress fracture and the races are opening up.  All systems go!

I published episode 15 of my new apocalypse podcast last week. I’m up to 6500 downloads.  Starting to build an audience.  I can use whatever help you can give me to spread the word to any of your science fiction geek friends.  It’s a serial.  So every week is a chapter.  I try to keep the story moving along and I get to practice character development, action and narrative. 

Sometimes I leave the listeners with a cliff-hanger so they have to tune in for the next show!

As I move you to the exit, let me tell you a story. 

Where did the phrase cliff-hanger come from?  Well, thank you for asking. 

It originated as a concept in the late 1800’s in Victorian serials.  But, it was popularized in America by and early film serial called “The Perils of Pauline” – where they would literally end the serial with Pauline hanging from a cliff. 

The Perils of Pauline was publicized by William Randolph Hearst the newspaper magnate, who would have cliff-hanger articles so that you’d have to go see the film to find out what happened. 

The cliffs she was hanging off of were actually in New Jersey, because this is before the movie industry was established in Hollywood. 

So there you go, a fun fact to share with your running buddies. 

I’m going to practice a bit of cognitive empathy by calling out 3 more of our RunRunLive members. 

First is my long time friend and co-conspirator Eric who has a strange fascination with Llamas and suffering.  Don’t worry, we’ll be back to our adventures in no time at all.

Next is Lawrence who is the commander of a rogue, stateless submarine that prowls the Pacific preventing the abuse of sea lions and baby seals.  Good work that. 

And third is our old friend Joerg from Germany who is a famous fashion designer working mostly with faux animal prints and spandex.  Very popular with the ladies.

Thank you all for you long time and continued support.  I would have hung up the microphone years ago if I didn’t have you folks lurking around my back door waiting for an episode to drop.

Hope everyone is healthy and happy. Take the time to practice empathy.  Be kind.  Help each other.

And I’ll see you out there.

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4454.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 5:24pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-453 – Stress Fractures!   

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4453.mp3]
Link epi4453.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-453 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Today’s show is all about stress fractures.  Because I discovered with the help of an MRI that I have a stress fracture in my knee.  Which is oddly comforting.  I was betting that it would be another case where the Doctor shrugs and tells me to take it easy and do some PT.  But, no, I have an honest to goodness, real-to-life, injury that you can see, or I guess that he can see. 

The Doctor asked me a silly question.  “Do you run a lot?”  That’s a solid ‘yes’. But, remember this was a follow up telephone call on the MRI, so he already talked to me.  I get the feeling he’s lost in a sea of patients. 

Anyhow – today we dedicate our show to the humble, but proud, stress fracture. 

At this point I’m 7 or 8 weeks into break.  I have been hiking most days with OIlie.  I’ve Been getting some easy bike rides.  I was about to launch full scale into some cross training and join the gym, now that I’ve had my first shot, but remember last time we talked?  I had just bounced myself on the road pretty hard after an unfortunate mountain bike incident? 

Yeah, well I’m pretty sure I broke a rib.  I’ve had a lost of pain there and haven’t really been able to do any kind of exercise while it heals.  So basically I’m just a mess.  An old, broken athlete. 

My original idea was to have the sound of bubble wrap in the background, and explain that my wife and my coach had told me to consider wrapping myself in a protective layer from now on. 

But, hey, A little time off won’t kill yah.

And today we talk about stress fractures. 

In section one I’ll talk about, well, Stress fractures.  In our interview I talk to Bill who had a good story about, well, I bet you can guess… Stress fractures. In section two I’ll talk about the new Geoffrey Moore book – which has nothing to do with stress fractures. 

I was about to say ‘Stress Fractures’ would be a good name for a punk band, but then I googled it, and it is indeed an emo punk band out of South Carolina – because of course there is an emo punk band out of South Carolina called the Stress Fractures – and that’s what I like about this world. 

 I kinda like their single “Rock and Roll is Dead”. 

I took this week off.  I mean from work.  It was a bit of an experiment.  I was a bit burnt out from this whole pandemic zoom call thing, but I didn’t really have a reason to take time off. 

My current company has an unlimited vacation policy.  Which is absolutely befuddling to a baby boomer. 

“So how much vacation do I get?” 

“It’s unlimited!”

“So, theoretically, I can just leave and never come back and you’ll keep paying me?”

“This is some sort of trap, right?”

I wanted to see if I could actually take a week and not get sucked back into work.  Maybe recharge a little.  Get some projects done. 

I’ve been mildly successful.  I did get pulled back in for some calls, and I haven’t gotten much done with my current physical disabilities. 

Monday was Patriots’ Day.  There was a lot of Boston Marathon chatter.  I posted a mile of my walk with Ollie for my Millennial Mile time of 23 minutes! A real scorcher there.  Now they send me a medal and the hat. 

I signed up for the virtual version of Boston again this year.  I’m in no shape to respect the race.  I probably won’t be by October.  But, by doing it virtually I can keep my streak intact.  Not that it matters because I don’t know how I’m going to qualify for the next one. 

This week on my self-imposed vacation I would make long lists of the things I wanted to get done, then proceed to waste time and not get them done. 

Do you do that?  DO you overcommit yourself and then get mad at yourself for not living up to your overcommitments?  That’s really setting yourself up to fail. 

Instead what you should do is set yourself up to succeed.  Instead of a making a long list, just pick one or two or three things that you want to accomplish today.  And if you get those things done the day is a win.  This is called ‘Winning the day’.

So that’s how you game the system.  Don’t do everything just do those things that give you the win.  And what you will find ins that when you win today, and then tomorrow and then string that together for a couple weeks you’ll start moving the needle. 

Win the day. 

On with the show!

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – Stress Fractures  - http://runrunlive.com/stress-fractures

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Bill Pritchett – Stress Fractures

Bill Pritchett is an avid runner and triathlete who lives in Midland, Michigan.  He recently retired from Dow Chemical, where he worked as an information systems analyst.  Fitness and endurance sports have long been a passion for Bill.  He ran his first marathon in Detroit in 1987 and is registered to run his 40th marathon in June of 2021.  His active Boston Marathon streak began in 2010 and will continue this fall.  When Bill is not running, he cross-trains with cycling, swimming, and weight lifting as part of his triathlon training.  He also enjoys cross-country skiing and downhill skiing during Michigan winters.  When Bill isn't training, he enjoys traveling and spending time with family and friends.  He and his wife Kandis have an adult daughter and son.  They both hope that staying active will give them a long, healthy retirement!

 

Section two – Zone to Win - http://runrunlive.com/zone-to-win

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have stressed our fractures through to the end of episode 4-453 of the  RunRunLive Podcast.  Careful with those weight bearing activities. 

Did you see Des Linden set a new 50K world record last week?  She ran a 2:59:54 , which averages out to 5:47 miles.  Think about that.  5:47 miles for 31+ miles.  That’s solid work. 

So yeah, I’m more than halfway through a 3 month hiatus in running.  It will be interesting to see what happens when I come back.  I’ll be curious to see how much I lose.  In these more lengthy layoffs I tend to lose some speed permanently now that I’m older. 

To be honest with you, I need to find a safer, healthier way to integrate running into my life. 

The rib is feeling much better today.  Maybe I’ll get back to the gym if it recovers quickly.  I’m still a mess as far as strength and flexibility go.  We’ll see.  I’m in no hurry.  I’m sanguine.

 May 9th is when I get my second vaccine shot.  Then I should be able to travel again and I hope so, because I miss the road.  I know most people loathe work travel, but I always enjoyed it.  Not the work part so much, but certainly the travel part. 

I’ve been spending more time in the Science Fiction world since I launched my Apocalypse podcast – After the Apocalypse.  It’s one of those things.  It always fascinates me to see how every seemingly niche subject has a crew of enthusiasts.  SciFi is no different. 

These folks are deep.  I’m not sure you’ll catch me dressing up as an alien and going to a convention on Parsippany to take selfies with 3rd string actors, but that does sound like a great place to people watch. 

Speaking of dangerous aliens I’d like to call out some members.  Yes, there is a membership option at the RunRunLive website.  I don’t push it because this is a hobby, not a business, but they do make me feel all warm and fuzzy like a cuddly puppy when they sign up and give me financial support. 

You know what the most expensive thing about podcasting is now?  Internet security.  There are so many bad actors out there that you have to have you web site locked down.  That’s the big reason I switched to Acast for my new show.  They handle all the security for me. 

But, back to our discussion about dangerous aliens I’d like to introduce some of our friends that have paid a membership recently. 

First is Marcie.  Marcie is a member of the international space force who is currently working to put out some accidental fires that got started on the attack ships off the shoulder of Orion.  It must be difficult to find a certified course to requalify for Boston out there. 

Then there’s Jason.  Jason is a professional archaeologist and undercover spy currently in deep cover in the Levant attempting to thwart organized crime in Babylon. 

Daniel F., who, hey Daniel, friend me on facebook or something so I know who you are, but my best guess is he’s either a shape shifting alien from the future or a multi-dimensional deamon sent as an explorer from a dying universe. But, that’s just an educated guess.  

Anyhow thanks for the support.  It takes a village. 

You know what else you can do?  Reach out to me or send some audio.  cyktrussell@gmail.com

It’s a fun thing.  Take some random audio of nature sounds and send those in.  I’ll use them in the outro!

I did mange to get my garden prepped and burn my brush pile this week.  So, yeah won those days. 

Other than that, I’ve been catching up on reading and writing and generally wasting time. 

One of the things you realize when you take time off work is that you don’t have to work.  You choose to work.  But, you could just as easily choose not to work. 

We make up so many rules and constraints on our lives, but at the end of the day, it is all just made up.  And those are your rules.

So If you don’t like them, make up some new rules.

Your game, your rules. 

And I’ll see you out there.

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4453.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 4:23pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-452 – Caffeine!   

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4452.mp3]
Link epi4452.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-452 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Today is Sunday April 11th.   Next week it Patriots Day up here in Greater Boston.  And due to the Apocalypse there will be no marathon. 

It’s a strange thing.  I was working in the garden yesterday, turning over my vegetable beds and I realized that for the last 20+ years I have not been working on my yard until after Patriots Day. 

I would be deep into the red, misty paranoia of the taper weeks, trying to cling to sanity.  One of my rules has always been not to do yard work during the taper.  Taper time is such a fragile time that I just wouldn’t risk it. 

You come out of 3 or 4 months of intense, committed training. Somehow you have miraculously avoided injury.  You’re not going to leave that effort under the bushes in your yard!

But not this year.  This year I’m injured anyhow and I’ve got no race, so it was nice to get out into the garden and work a bit while before it gets hot and buggy. 

This week we are going to talk to the owner of Caffeine bullet all about caffeine. 

I am a coffee drinker.  I usually drink two 16-oz cups of good coffee in the morning.  I like the darker stuff, arabica beans.  I get my coffee from Starbucks and grind it myself.  I love the smell of coffee being ground.  I get great joy from that first sip of hot coffee on a cold morning.

I switch over to tea in the afternoon.  I’ve been mixing oolong tea with yerba matte, less than a half teaspoon of each into my silicon tea bag.  Then I refill it all afternoon without changing the tea grounds. Eventually, by the end of the day it’s just hot water!

I’ve never been a heavy medicator when running.  I know ultra-runners who take caffeine pills and ibuprofen by the fist full in their events.  To be honest with you, I just don’t think that is healthy.  I think it’s probably a crutch that they could train away from.  But, everyone leads their own life. 

I will take a caffeinated gel before a race or when it gets hard late in a marathon to get that boost of energy.  

Today we talk about caffeine.

Then in Section one I’m going to re-read a piece I wrote in 2013 when I was coming back from my 18 month dalliance with plantar fasciitis. 

I have this tradition of writing a piece before every Boston Marathon.  I’m glad I did this because It’s an interesting historical document.  As you listen to it remember what happened in 2013.  I ended up having a horrible race. 

I was walking by Newton.  And because of that I was behind where I usually would be. 

I never made it to that finish line.  Or, more accurately I made it to that finish line in 2014. 

In section two I’m going to talk a bit about pandemic shopping habits.  It’s been a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to observe consumer behavior.  I find it interesting. 

When I was working in my garden I had my phone in my pocket and was trying to listen to podcasts.  I realized how noisy it is in my neighborhood on a Saturday. 

There are various saws and lawn equipment buzzing.  There are planes flying around overhead.  The dog is barking his fool head off at hikers in the woods and walkers on the street.  It’s a cacophony!

I’m still staying off my knee.  It will be six weeks on Friday this week.  I had my appointment with the knee guy.  X-rays didn’t show much except I have very little arthritis in my knees. 

I’ll give you a little play-by-play on the dance. 

I went into the office early on a Monday.  They gave me a clipboard with paper to fill out.  Each piece of paper asked the same questions about name, DOB, etc.  I got through two of them before I was called in for my X-rays. 

Then I was hustled into an exam room with my clipboard.  Changed into a very utilitarian pair of exam shorts. 

The lady, who is not a doctor but has the same basic training as a doctor and I talked about my injury.   She poked and prodded a bit. 

I asked her if she wanted my clip board, she said no. 

Then the Dr. himself joined me and went through the same routine.  At one point he started talking about me in the 3rd person which was confusing.  “I’ve got this gentleman who’s a runner and wants to keep doing it…” 

And I’m thinking, “Do I know him?  Sounds like I should.”

He said the knee looked a little swollen and recommended the MRI and a follow up.

That was my 5 minutes or less with the Dr. 

Then another lady, who was not a doctor, came in with the MRI information.  I asked her if she wanted the clipboard and she said to leave it in the room.   No one ever looked at it. It’s probably still sitting on a chair with all my personal information for the other patients to read like an old copy of Highlights magazine.

I was already familiar with the MRI process from my injury in the fall – so that was easy – I got that this week and have my follow up 5 minute phone call with the doctor next week. 

Where he will offer vague comments, painkillers and physical therapy.  I will thank him and decline that offer, now a few thousand out of pocket dollars closer to my deductible, and get back to work, as I have always done. 

And you should too.

That’s all we can control. 

We keep positive, put in the work and let the road come to us. 

On with the show.

 

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – 2013 Boston Marathoin  - http://runrunlive.com/fitness-recovery-and-the-2013-boston-marathon-2

 

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

David Hellard – Caffeine Bullet

https://www.caffeinebullet.com/nutrition

 

https://www.badboyrunningpodcast.com/

 

info@caffeinebullet.com

THE BENEFITS OF CAFFEINE IN SPORT

Fat Mobilisation

Caffeine releases fat into the bloodstream, mobilising fat stores and delaying muscle glycogen depletion. Caffeine allows athletes to train harder, longer and faster before becoming fatigued - allowing you to get a new personal best, gain extra places in a race or those last few reps in the gym.

Reduced Perception of Effort and Pain

Caffeine affects the central nervous system, influencing the dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems, decreasing the symptoms of fatigue. A reduction in skeletal muscle pain and force sensation also lowers the perception of effort making it easier to train hard and go beyond your mental limits.

Improved Focus and Concentration

Caffeine users maintain a higher dopamine concentration especially in those brain areas linked with 'attention'. Through this neurochemical interaction, caffeine improves sustained concentration and focus. Not only great for the office, but mental fatigue also plays a vital role in performance in endurance events.

 

Section two – Pandemic Shopping - http://runrunlive.com/pandemic-shopping-trends

 

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have Shaked and jittered from our caffeine through to the end of episode 4-452 of the  RunRunLive Podcast.  Now it will be impossible to sleep tonight.  

I went in Yesterday and got my first vaccine shot.  Yay!  It was the Moderna vaccine.  Moderna is a Boston company.    I got it in the early morning.  Have my second shot scheduled for May. 

I felt fine all day, I bit thirsty, but fine.  Worked in the garden and stacked some wood and ran my errands.  Then I met my buddies for a trail ride on the mountain bikes.  It was a wonderful ride until I crashed as we were coming in. 

It was one of those weird things that happens so fast you just can’t respond.  We were crossing a road section, going slow, talking.  I had my right hand off the handlebars for some reason.  Frank drifted in front of me so I instinctively pulled the brake on the left which, is, unfortunately the front brake.

The wheel locked and my momentum threw me over onto my right side.  Didn’t hit my head but landed pretty heavy on my side and was in a fair amount of pain.  Still am today.  Seem to have a good bruise on that latissimus and the rib.  But I’ll live. 

The weather has been fantastic.  Warm and dry.  The trails are all dried up. 

I got a surprise visit from Just Plain Dave our ultra-running friend who lives a bit south of me on Thursday afternoon.  I couldn’t run but we went on a 2-3 mile hike down by the pond and let Ollie get some exercise.  It was good to get out and talk to someone.  He got to experience the canine crazy that is Ollie Wollie the Crazy Collie.

Ollie is turning 2 years old and he’s starting to mellow out a bit. 

Dave and I talked through my new SciFi podcast and he helped me with some plot points and recommendations on character arcs.  It’s been fun producing that and I think the last couple chapters have been really good. 

Don’t’ forget to go to subscribe, either on Acast or iTunes, it’s After the Apocalypse.  Leave a review.  Tell some friends.  Send me some feedback.

And finally, I have a editorial clarification for my friend Russ who used to live in Duchess.  He sent me a note that he was disappointed in me for referring to R2D2 as a ‘humanoid’ robot in the last show.

Yes indeed.  You are right. I meant “human-like”.  Probably should have gone with C3PO.  But, my point was we are still a few years away from a general AI that can enable robots to do all the things a human can.

There was an actor inside of R2D2 in the Lucas films. English Actor Kenny Baker, at 3ft 8 inches tall was R2D2’s inner human. 

I’ve had  a lot of adventure for a couple weeks haven’t I?

The next thing I have on the calendar is the Patriots Day Mile, which is a virtual race put on by the BAA next Monday.  I’m going to take the week off anyhow.  I should be able to run a mile.  I liked the hat, so I signed up. 

After that I am signed up for Hood to Coast at the end of August and the Boston virtual in October.  I signed up for the virtual because I don’t want to waste a charity bib and I don’t know if I’m going to be able to requalify, ever, and it counts towards my streak if I do decide to try and run going forward. 

I’m starting to consolidate on a plan.  The last few times I’ve had these types of injuries I’ve switched to cross training to build strength and flexibility while letting my legs heal.  I’m thinking I’ll join the gym now that I’m vaccinated and perhaps start hitting the pool and the weights. 

I think the change will do me good.  It always has in the past.

That’s the opportunity.  Look ahead and see where the advantage is.  Look inside and see what you’ve got for tools to use, and then use them the best you can. 

I’ve got that itch to start a new project. 

You’ve got to scratch that itch.

And I’ll see you out there.

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4452.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 1:42pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-451 – Dylan Runs and Writes  

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4451.mp3]
Link epi4451.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-451 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

How’s everyone doing?  Spring has arrived up here in New England.  We will lose the last of the snow today.  There is one dirty little pile in the lee of my stone wall in the front lawn that has been tenaciously hanging on. 

The weather has been fabulous these last two weeks.  Up into the 50’s and 60’s Fahrenheit.  What we call mud season up here.  Quickly followed by allergies and black flies, and settling into mosquitoes. 

But, in all seriousness, It is a interesting thing to be able to watch.  The animals know it’s spring before we do.  Less than a month ago it was snow and single digits but the birds knew spring was coming.  You could here them in the mornings busying up new nests and beginning the process of raising the next generation. 

I was walking Ollie on morning this week and I had to pause and marvel at the noise. 

This time of year, we have what are known as vernal pools.  That’s where the water gathers during the spring melt in glacial hollows.  They only manifest this time of year.  They are ephemeral pools of water.  They dry up by late June. 

Because of their ephemeral nature they have no fish in them.  Because there are no fish the local amphibians and insects run riot like partiers on a South Beach spring break.  I had to stop and listen because the level of noise from the frogs coming out of this vernal pool was so loud.  Where less than 30 days ago it was frozen solid.

Life finds a way.  We all find a way. 

I am still laid up with the sore knee.  It’s been 4 weeks off running.  I did try a little bit of running but it needs more rest.  I have experience with these things.  It’s typically 6-8 weeks, unless there’s real damage, then it could be 6 months. 

I’m ok with that. With these nice days I wish I could be out in the woods with Ollie.  I’ve been riding my bike more as the weather improves.  It will take me a couple weeks to get my bike legs back.   I’m lucky enough to have a lot of experience with both road biking and mountain biking, and to have enough equipment to do both without an large expenditure!

In between I’ve been doing core workouts and long yoga sessions. 

Today we talk to Dylan who is a writer of young adult fiction.  I ran into Dylan through our friend Ann who we’ve had on the podcast.  Dylan is a runner and I talk to him about running and writing. 

In the back of my mind, I have always wanted to be a writer, because I enjoy the process and get great satisfaction from the work.  This has always been true.  At one point I was pursuing journalism in college but realized that wasn’t going to provide the standard of living I wanted, and instead I turned to business. 

This project of RunRunLive came from my desire to write again.  It forces me to write something for every show. 

I think the lesson here is that you can still pursue those things you’re passionate about, throughout your life.  You can clear a space for whatever that is and still put boiled potatoes on the table.  There’s always a tradeoff.  Or you can choose to go all in, like Dylan and make a career out of it.

It’s your decision.  It’s not an either/or decision.  It’s and either/and decision. 

Let’s face it, there are millions of us runners who will never win a race.  But we still have that passion.  We still like to get out and find our own personal edge and derive that satisfaction.

My new podcast, After the Apocalypse, is letting me play more in science fiction than I have before.  I probably won’t win a Hugo award from it, but I’m learning stuff and enjoying the process.

That’s the lesson. 

Find a way to explore things that you might be passionate about. 

There’s always a new adventure on the horizon.

On with the show.

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – Knee injuries  - http://runrunlive.com/knee-injuries

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Dylan Roche – full-time journalist, blogger, and novelist

Sure! Here's a headshot, a picture of my book cover, and a picture of me at a book signing, whichever you think would work best for what you need. Here's my bio:

 

Dylan Roche is a full-time journalist, blogger, and novelist based in Annapolis, Maryland. When he isn't busting out words on his laptop, he can usually be found going on long-distance runs or training for his next marathon. His first book, The Purple Bird, debuted in 2019, and he's currently working on the next installment of the series. Follow him at www.dylanrochewriter.com or on Twitter and Instagram at @dylaniswriting

 

 

Section two – Robots - http://runrunlive.com/robots

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have, what?, Roboticized?  Limped?  Written? through to the end of Episode 4-451 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  What ever it is, here we are.

Like I said earlier, I’m still nursing a sore knee.  I made an appointment to take some pictures.  See what’s going on in there. 

The snow is gone, and that makes Ollie sad, because one of his favorite things was to pee in the snow.  It is like one of those fancy restaurants where they put shaved ice in the urinals.

Shout out to our friend Tim who’s embarking on the Appalachian Trail next week.  That’s a cool adventure, and I can tell he’s excited about it.

I’ll tell you a story about the last time I had a knee problem.  I think it was 2004.  You may not have heard this story as that is pre-Podcast – unless you were reading my blog at the time!

I used to have an office in Quebec City.  I used to drive up there because it was easier than flying. 

I think it was the end of the summer, but I can’t be sure.  Buddy was just a puppy, maybe 9-months old.  I was only a few years into serious running.  I had spent a couple years with Achilles problems but was in a comeback of sorts – running very well – lined up to requalify.

One morning, after rushing through my run, jumping in the shower I headed out, as usual in a rush. 

A few aggressive mosquitoes got into the truck with me.  As I was leaving my driveway and my neighborhood I was swatting at these mosquitoes and took my eyes off the road.  I ran into a telephone pole less than a ¼ mile from my house. 

Yes I did.  Low speed, but enough to total my truck.  I had my seat belt on but smashed my knee into the dashboard, among other things.  

No one believed the mosquito story.  They figured I was on the phone or eating something. 

I sorted it out and went on with my trip but there was something not quite right in my right knee.  A visit to the knee doctor confirmed that I had broken the end of the patella.  I was off my feet for the better part of 6 months. 

I remember returning to running with Buddy in the trails behind my house, overweight and out of shape.  I remember those first few runs were the dog would literally laugh at my slow progress, and I would tell him to enjoy it because I would some day still be running when he was gone. 

I slowly, and then rapidly got into shape, through training and racing.  I eventually requalified that fall and ran the next year’s Boston.

I lost some speed in that layoff that I would not get back, but I found new adventures in trail running, and mountain running and ultra-running that enriched my life. 

A few years later I found you folks as well and that kicked off a whole new epoch of adventures.

I’m going to believe that I’m in that same place today.  That in in 2 months or 2 months or six months I’ll be climbing back out to new adventures. 

That’s what I will focus on.  New opportunities and new adventures. 

That’s what you should focus on as well. 

And I’ll see you out there.

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4451.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 11:12am EDT

Dick Hoyt Interview January 2013

Originally Episode 3-353 of the RunRunLive Podcast

Direct download: DickHoytInterview.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 4:51pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-450 – Tom Grilk CEO BAA  

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4450.mp3]
Link epi4450.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-450 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Since we, you and I, have arrived at a milestone of sorts, we’ve got an extra special show for you today.  Somehow I got past the rational screeners of the BAA and got Tom Grilk to do an interview with me.  I had not planned for this to coincide with the announcements around this year’s Boston Marathon, but it did. 

I just happened to be talking with Tom while he was being chased by NPR and all the other real news organizations.  He literally hung up with me and then spoke with NPR.  Apparently there was some kerfuffle around letting people run Boston who had not ‘earned’ the right.  You know, all that typical stuff around Boston. 

Anyhow, like I said before I have been an admirer of Tom from afar for a long time.  He grew up with the local marathon royalty and now gets to hang out with the marathon royalty of the world as the CEO of the BAA.  It’s a good chat.  Tom is a well-spoken, thoughtful guy.  And a runner.

Since we were arriving at a milestone episode I figured I’d put his interview in here. 

In section one I’m going to talk about taking some time off the heal.  In section two I’m going to give you a primer on a business bingo term that is all the rage these days. 

I have had a hilarious couple of weeks since we last talked. 

Remember I said I tweaked my knee?  Yeah, so that’s a real thing.  Haven’t run a step since that fateful Friday night hill workout. 

But it’s ok.  I needed the break. 

Also in these two hilarious weeks was my wife’s birthday and our anniversary.  Always a dangerous time.  Fraught with opportunities to make an ass of myself.  But, this year it was hilarious. 

I came down with some sort of plague.  Not sure what it was.  It might have been psychosomatic.  Maybe stress related?  I took a test for the currently popular plague, and it wasn’t that.

But, here are the hilarious symptoms.  I got a horrible rash over some large swaths of my body.  Had to go to the clinic and get some prednisone.  The fake Dr. at the clinic told me I had scabies – which, although matches the symptoms was not entirely possible given that I’ve been locked in my house for 12 months. 

At the same time I had 3-4 days of horrible gas.  Like drive the humans out of the house gas. Like, painful, have to mute the zoom call every three minutes gas. 

Yes, and this is the set of symptoms that my long-suffering wife had to contend with during our anniversary.

You can’t make this stuff up. Well, you could, but it wouldn’t be as funny.

I’m out the other end of it, pun not entirely unintended, but I haven’t done a workout in two weeks, and I find myself oddly humbled and sanguine.    

I also drove my mom down to Foxboro to get her second shot of the vaccine which is a load off everyone’s mind.

Poor Ollie is suffering through this as well as he creeps up on his 2nd birthday.  No runs for him.  I did manage to limp in a walk or two. But he doesn’t like to sit around. 

I’m going to give the knee a full 3 weeks off before I test it.  One of the things I’ve learned over the many years is that coming back to early doesn’t pay. 

Tomorrow I’m going to take my old bike Fuji-san out for a roll.  I’ll work in some strengthening yoga this week.  We’ll see if we can’t get back out on the roads next week. 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day.  I think I read that I can claim Irish citizenship because my Grandmother was an Irish citizen.  Not sure what that buys me.  I’ve never been to Ireland and would love to visit.  Put that on the bucket list.

Can you believe that it’s been over a year since I’ve gotten on an airplane?  Holy cow!.  Who knew?  The world ahs changed so much in my lifetime. 

Change is where it’s at.  There’s an old joke that everyone should embrace change, except, of course the people who are telling you to embrace change. Change is great, as long as it’s happening to someone else, right?

It’s a journey.  What I like about talking to Tom is that he’s discovering new things and helping the BAA bring change to the Boston Marathon.  It’s a real skill of management to shepherd something with so much history through positive change. 

If you look at happy people, successful people and admired people they haven’t led calm and peaceful lives with no change.  Just the opposite.  Their lives have been filled with rapid and abrupt change.  How they dealt with, or reacted to, or led through that change is what makes them happy and successful. 

So – my friends, don’t ask for a passive life that rolls down a smooth road from cradle to grave.  Lack of change is not peace.  Lack of change is stasis and ennui.  Give a big hug to the bumpy road of life and smile you way through it.

On with the show.

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – Healing time  - http://runrunlive.com/healing-is-it-ok-to-take-time-off-to-heal

Voices of reason – the conversation

Tom Grilk – CEO BAA

https://tedxbeaconstreet.com/videos/in-boston-everyone-owns-the-marathon/

Tom Grilk

Executive Director, Boston Athletic Association

Tom Grilk is the Executive Director of the Boston Athletic Association, which annually conducts the B.A.A. Boston Marathon as well as a number of other athletic and community service events.

He is a long time member of the Boston Athletic Association, having served on its Board of Governors since 1990 and as its President (outside Board Chair) from 2003-2010. In 2011 he assumed the role of Executive Director of the Boston Athletic Association, with responsibility for the day-to-day management of the organization. During his tenure he has worked with the B.A.A. Board and staff to strengthen the B.A.A. as an organization, especially from a managerial perspective. He has also worked with the Board in shaping the B.A.A.’s short and long-term development across all areas of the B.A.A.’s activity: the conduct of athletic events, the operation of community service initiatives, and the training and development of athletes.

He practiced corporate and business law over many years in and around Boston, both with the Boston law firm Hale and Dorr and serving as counsel and general counsel to several well-known companies in the information technology and semiconductor fields, including Digital Equipment Corporation, Teradyne, Inc. and Brooks Automation, Inc. As a lawyer he worked in the fields of securities law, M&A transactions, corporate governance, compliance, dispute resolution, competition law, commercial law and intellectual property. He is a graduate of Cornell University and received his Juris Doctor degree from the University of Michigan Law School

In addition to his duties as Executive Director, Grilk has had his share of hands-on experience with the Boston Marathon, the B.A.A.’s premier event. He has been the marathon’s finish line announcer since 1979 and is a former competitor, having run a personal best marathon time of 2:49:03 in 1978 and a Boston Marathon personal best of 2:54 that same year.

 

 

Section two – Digital Transformation - http://runrunlive.com/digital-transformation

 

Outro

Ok my friends digitally transformed through to the end of Episode 4-449 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  No algorithm will ever be able to run a marathon, right?

We set the clocks back! One less hour to get stuff done! 

My old man running group went out this morning for 7 miles.  Frank’s coming back up to speed since having his second hip done.  Tim has decided to just ignore the weird feeling in his knee.  Brian is chugging al long at 2 runs a week.  And I rode my bike alongside them. 

The knee feels better. A previous version of Chris probably would have taken it for a test drive today, but I’m going to give it another week to heal before I test it. 

I’m going to start easing back into things this week.  With the longer days I should be able to get out on Fuji-San, my old road bike a few times and I’ll start working in some long yoga sessions for strength and stability.

Then I’ll spin up the running slowly, or not.  I could use a break.  We’ll see.  

I do have an itch to get out and see some new places and maybe that means run some new races now that the pandemic seems to be waning instead of waxing. 

I took my Mom to get her second vaccine shot but I’m still at the back of the line.  Could I claim over-training as a medical condition? 

I am up to 11 episodes of my new apocalypse story podcast project.  I do appreciate any podcast love you can give it.  I have to figure out a way I can get some more eyeballs on it.  I don’t’ have the time or capital for the marketing it needs!

You can search for it on your favorite pod-catcher as After the Apocalypse. 

Is there anyone who Doesn’t have a podcast these days?  It seems like everyone just paired up to interview each other.  

I got a new product to test out.  It’s called Caffeine Bullet.  The owner sent me some to try.  It’s like a caffeine candy with 100mg of caffeine in each candy.  I haven’t tried them yet.  I do like my caffeine though.  I think these might be a good kick in the ass late in a long run.  The timing is poor with me not currently training, but I’ll let you know when I get to them.

I know I’ve been a bit maudlin recently.  The long pandemic, the cold dark days of winter, my training not going great, my work being a pain in the butt… It all weighs in on top of a guy. 

But it’s not a reason to despair.  It’s a reason to celebrate.  We get to do these things.  My life is filled with health and prosperity.  I’ve got things I want to do.  I’ve got things I get to do. 

You do too.  You may feel like you’re shoveling water, but you get to choose.  You could walk away.  You could buy a van and sell your house.  No one is stopping you. 

You, my friend, whether you believe it or not, are in control of your life. 

I always liked asking Dave MacGilvray what his favorite adventure was.  Because he’ll always say “the next one.”  And he’ll say it with conviction. 

I’ve got a lot of things I want to do.  And I’m doing them. 

You’ve got a lot of things you want to do?  You should just start doing them. 

As a crunchy old New Englander said:

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,  

But I have promises to keep,  

And miles to go before I sleep,  

And miles to go before I sleep

 

And I’ll see you out there.

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4450.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:37pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-449 – Your Spring Nutrition Plan

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4449.mp3]
Link epi4449.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-449 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Are you hungry?  Are you feeling a bit porky after this long winter of our discontent? 

Well that’s good! Because today Rachel my nutrition coach and I talk about how to tackle that spring nutrition plan.  The do’s and Don’ts and some simple things that can lead to success. 

In section one I’ll walk you through a long tempo run.  In section two I’ll talk about tall birds stabbing frogs. 

It’s been an interesting couple of weeks since we last spoke.  I was supposed to be wrapping up two weeks of hard training this week with another 3 hour long run today.  But, I seem to have tweaked something in my left knee running hill repeats last night. 

That’s the danger of doing high effort, high impact workouts on tired legs.  Eventually something gives up.  The benefit is, if you get through, you have a big improvement in your fitness and your capacity to race. 

If you get through, that is. 

I was hoping to get through this week and hit all my workouts, but the old body is talking to me.  It’s telling me that I’m not stretching enough, that I’m doing too much too fast and I’m not giving myself enough time to recover. 

It’s been challenging because my job is taking up too much time.  Time in the mornings.  Time in the evenings.  That I would normally have for training.  I don’t complain (much).  I focus on getting the workouts done.

But this leads to two things that raise the risk of injury.  First is the weather.  I can’t control the weather.  And I do believe there is no such thing as bad weather, just soft athletes.  But, this means I’m throwing some extra work at my body having to deal with the snow and ice on the trails and the slippery roads. 

Second, because by the time I get out to do my workout it’s late and I’m emotionally drained.  That’s important, because for these bigger, harder workouts you really need to be able to bring your mental ‘A’ game.  The quality of the work suffers. 

I’ve been skating on thin ice, (pun intended), for a few weeks now and it caught up with me.  I don’t think it’s serious.  There’s nothing swelling or aching.  Just a sharp pain when I put weight on the flexed knee – think lunge mechanics. 

So – instead of my long run today in the freezing rain, I’m talking to you!

Had a great email from an old friend of the show yesterday.  Those of you who have been with me for a while might remember Collin who did all the running parody songs.  He told me that someone with another running podcast had found the old songs we made and interviewed him. 

I remember running in Seattle with him when my wife and I were out there on vacation, maybe 2013?

I told him I had just watched the Mott the Hoople Rockumentary on YouTube and had a new song idea for him.  It’s to the tune of “All the Young Dudes” – but the parody would be about a runner who left some gels in their gear bag in the trunk of their car and the gels exploded all over their running stuff before a race. It’s called “All the old Gu’s”.

It would go like this:

All the old Gu's, 

Stuck in my shoes,

Banana Gu's, 

Stuck in my shoes, 

 

It’s a guaranteed hit. 

The weather is turning here.  We’ve got a bit of melt.  This means the trails will go from snow, to ice, to mud, alternatively until the end of April. 

I’ll be honest.  I’ve been getting the anxiety as much as everybody else during this house arrest.  There are some days where I just don’t want to show up on Zoom or talk to anyone. 

These long days where basically all I do is roll out of bed, work all day, go for a late run, read for a few minutes, fall asleep and do it all over again feel like a treadmill.  By the time I get back from my run it’s after 8:00 and I’m asleep by 10:00. 

On a positive note the days are getting luxuriously long now – the sun is up at 6:30 and sets after 5:30.  If I didn’t have a standing call at 5:00 I might be able to run in the daylight!  And I’m getting plenty of sleep.  I’m probably averaging more than 8.5 hours.  And I don’t have time to do anything harmful or stupid.  So there’s that.

It’s in situations like this that we endurance athletes have an advantage.  We can look at this life like a marathon or an ultra.  We can appreciate the sucky days, even if we are stringing many together in a row.  We can stand back from it and realize that all we have to do is keep moving through the suck. 

All we have to do is keep going with consistency, even when the joy and enthusiasm leave us.  Consistency and perseverance will overcome any obstacles eventually. 

So, don’t be downtrodden or disheartened in this winter of our discontent.  Just keep showing up.  And if you can show up with a smile in your face, that’s even better.

On with the show.

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – The Long Tempo - http://runrunlive.com/the-long-tempo

Voices of reason – the conversation

Rachel Shuck – Next Level Fitness

Here is my contact info and an attached pic :)

 

Email: rachelshuck @ nextlevelnutrition.fitness

 

Website: https://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/

 

 

Section two – Memories and Notebooks - http://runrunlive.com/memories-and-notebooks

Outro

Ok my friends We’ve eaten a good breakfast and that allowed us to get through to the end of Episode 4-449 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  

I always like talking to Rachel.  She’s actually working with my wife right now and it’s weird for me to be in the other side for a change. 

Next week I’m going to be talking to a runner who is also a writer of young adult fantasy fiction.  Interesting stuff.  He said he liked my new apocalypse podcast (After the Apocalypse) but I think he might just be shining me on!

By the way thank you for all the listens and the reviews on iTunes.  I appreciate it.  The writing and editing has been very satisfying. 

And on the horizon I’m coordinating a call with Tom Grilk – who is one of the leaders of the BAA here in Boston.  A real mover and shaker in the Boston running scene.  If you have not listened to the BAA podcast I would recommend it.  A couple of Tom’s interviews are outstanding. 

Tatyana McFadden is amazing and Des Linden’s Boston win in 2018 told through the lens of a couple of insiders is amazing.  There aren’t that many episodes and it appears to have pod-faded but the ones that are out there are good and Tom does a great job.  Very polished guy.

I’m looking forward to Massachusetts getting it’s act together on the Vaccine so I can get back into an airplane.  Boston has been pushed out to October.  I’m not sure whether I’ll run or not.  At this point I’m stuck in the end of an age group. 

I wrote a post on this, probably 10 year’s ago! Called “Crazy Eights”.  The qualifying standards are linear but your ability loss in non-linear, so when you hit an age that ends with an 8, qualifying is really hard, especially with the new times.  I’d have to run 3:35 marathon to qualify.  Which doesn’t sound that hard in theory, but I think it’s beyond my grasp. 

The thing is, in a scant 12 months I get another 15 minutes which reels it back into the realm of possibility.  You never know.  It’s such a heavy lift right now I’m not sure I have the mental capacity to do it again. 

We opened this podcast today with the concept of consistency.  I think it’s only appropriate that we close it with a discussion of habits and to-do lists.

I had an interested philosophical conversation with myself this week. 

I had it with myself because there’s no one else to talk to in the apocalypse.  Accept maybe the dog.  But his philosophy is much more rudimentary and deals mostly with balls and runs and occasional belly rubs.

Frankly, that’s what I like about dogs.  Theirs is a more honest philosophy then we will ever achieve.

I was thinking about habits and tasks lists. 

What precipitated this was a few recent experiences and some environmental stresses.

My current job has me scrambling to keep up with a seemingly endless flow of tasks.  My current training plan is getting into the dark place where workouts are apocalyptically challenging.  We are deep in the heart of darkness winter-wise in New England. 

That’s a snapshot of life at a point in time. 

A seasonal cycle.

I know this. 

But it still causes pressure. 

A long day on the video calls with clients who have intractable problems that require my attention, my accountability, and my empathy.  Followed by a long, hard workout in the dark and snow.  Left with a scant hour of consciousness to maybe grab a quick dinner, read a chapter in a book and fall into a worried sleep, only to do it all again the next day.

Like I said, I know this.  We all have these times.  These dark places.  That is the seasonal nature of life. 

And we develop tools to deal with these dark places. Tools to survive so we can enjoy the sunny times.

One of these tools is habits. 

Habits allow us to get more done more efficiently.  If you can habitize yourself to get up, do the work, and be rigorous about the tasks in front of you, you can get through to the other side. 

But, this week in the philosophical discussion with myself I questioned the outcome assumptions.

We build these habits so that we can get things done, but why?  What does getting these things done have to do with anything important?  Isn’t this just an attempt to automate rote and joyless activities so that we can get through them faster without giving as much?

It starts to feel like you’re bailing the ocean with a toy bucket.

The justification in optimizing the task list and building habits is to be able to free up time to do the things you want to do. 

In my philosophical discussions with myself I realized that this justification was just another form of a classic lie.  The classic lie is that by making you more efficient we are going to free up time to do ‘more important things’. 

Whether by choice or rule, that’s not what happens. 

What happens is that as soon as we lift one plastic pail of tasks out of the ocean another pail-full of tasks flows in behind to fill the void.  Until you are at capacity again.  You aren’t doing ‘more important things’.  You’re doing more of the same stuff faster with less attention and no joy. 

Now, one saving grace of the habit hamster wheel is that it promotes or creates consistency.  And there are many important goals that require consistency.   For instance, if you are training for an event – consistency trumps everything else.  If you are saving money for a worthy thing, again, consistency trumps everything else. 

There is power in consistency.  Habit promotes consistency.  But there is also a mindless spinning of the endless wheel that you have to put a foot to or you will habit yourself into a joyless grave.

So – as you and I get on with our weeks, let us not be a slave to habit.  Let’s be brave enough not to finish a task list.  Let’s look at these things and ask ‘why?’.  And then say ‘no’. 

Find those things that give you joy, not pleasure, joy.  Use your magnificent to-do lists to schedule a few of these things into you habit hamster wheel. 

Take an hour and a half in the middle of a perfectly good workday and go out for a run in the sun.  No one will ever know.  When they ask you why you didn’t do X or Y you say “I’ve had to prioritize recently and I just haven’t gotten to it.”

Which is the truth.

And then if you’re extra Machiavellian, you can ask a follow up question.  “Is there any way I can get some help with some of this stuff?  I hate to leave it half finished.”

That’s it.  Do your best.  Make sure you remember to stick up for yourself. 

And I’ll see you out there.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4449.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 9:33am EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 – A Mid-Winter Tale

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/AMWT.mp3]
Link AMWT.mp3

Hello folks this is Chris.  Unfortunately I wasn’t able to find the time to podcast this week.  I don’t know about you folks but I’ve had a crazy couple of weeks.  Actually it’s been pretty crazy since before the holidays.

I won’t bore you with the details but my job has been super time consuming.  I’ve got calls starting in the morning every day and also in the evenings. And you know the morning time is my writing time. 

But, I’ll give you an update. 

I wrapped up my week of training last week with a stellar 30K long run on the roads.  We got more than a foot of snow and it was too soft to do a multi-hour long run in.  I was worried about switching to the road so abruptly. And I did pick up a little soreness in my plantar, but for the most part it was a great run.

Let me tell you the story.

I set out from my house in the direction of the rail trail in the next town over.  I figured if the snow was going to be packed down and passable anywhere it would be on the rail trail. 

I can get to the midpoint of the trail about 10K from my house, so I headed out nice and slow in that direction.  It was a sunny day, no wind, but pretty cold.  I did my errands in the morning and waited for it to warm up a bit. 

The roads were dry but with the snow there were some places where the shoulders got a bit skinny.  I wanted to avoid too much hill work and stay on back roads. 

I wore my vest with the two 500ML mammary bottles under my outer layer because it was in the high-teens, low twenties.  After the previous week’s bad adventure with the spoiled gel I decided to go full ultra-fuel and keep it simple.  I made a nice organic peanut butter and honey sandwich on Dave’s 21 grain bread.  I cut it into 3X3 chunks – so 9 bite-size pieces and threw them into a plastic bag and stuffed them in a pocket. 

When I got to the trail It was impassable.  I stopped to eat a couple pieces of sandwich, take a drink and figure out what to do next.  As I was standing by the side of the road, basically having a stand up picnic, cars kept stopping and waving me across.  And I was like, “no, I’m not crossing.” I finally had to scootch back into a driveway to stay out of their line of site. 

I figured I was an hour in and felt pretty good, so I’d just keep going east and see where I ended up.  I vaguely knew where I was.  I headed out through the back roads of Westford and east into Carlisle.  Babe Ruth lived in Carlisle when he played for the Red Sox. 

Eventually I came to a main road.  I was trying to figure out where I was. I only needed a few more minutes, so I mentally flipped a coin and turned left. 

I’m glad I did because in a couple hundred feet I came upon Great Brook State Park.   This is a good-sized park in Carlisle that I’m familiar with having mountain biked in there a few time.   I learned that I am about 9 miles away from the park crow-fly if I take the back roads.  Which is cool. 

With the snow, they had opened it up as a snowshoe and cross-country ski venue. The place was packed.  On the east side they were selling tickets to get in and ski.  I asked if I could go into the trails on the west side where people were snowshoeing.  They said it was ok.

The trails were packed down and perfect for running and it was beautiful. The sun was high and families were out.  I just ripped around in the woods for a few minutes.

Then I popped back out on the road and headed back home after eating some more sandwich and taking a drink.

Really beautiful day.

On my way out I had noticed that it was apparently trash day in Carlisle because all the trask cans were out at the end of driveways. I began playing the beer can game that I like to play.  The way this works of course is that you pick up a beer can that some a-hole has tossed out the car window and you drop it in the next trash can. 

I felt pretty good now, still running well.  Not fast.  But well.  No crash.  Good energy. 

And I crossed back into Westford.  As I was coming back through Westford, I got cocky.  I saw a brown paper bag in the snow bank and figured I’d throw it out.  It turned out to be a empty fifth of vodka.  Which is a good-sized bottle.  And a glass bottle too.  Then I see a Bud-light tall boy and grab that too.

So I’m running down the road carrying an empty vodka bottle in a brown paper bag like a football and a big beer can and I realize “Oh Crap!” it’s not trash day in Westford and there’s no place to put these.  I went on for a mile or so like that looking in peoples’ driveways and such, but eventually gave up and put them back into the snowbank.  I chose and obvious place at the corner of a neighborhood figuring someone would pick them up. 

Ce’st la vie.

As I was heading up Powers road towards my house I realized I was going to be short on my planned time so I re-routed through the Nashoba Mountain ski area.  It was packed too.  I guess the virus is afraid of heights.  

I stopped at the kiddee slope to see if I could find my running buddy Bob who is a ski instructor there, but I didn’t.  I kept going, starting to get a bit leg-tired now, out through the back to the tubing hill. 

It was a perfect day for tubing.  Plenty of snow and cold enough to keep the snow fast.  Of course the tubing hill was packed as well. 

As I churned through watching the kids rocket down slope, I thought about how we would do this when I was a kid.  We’d grab something totally dangerous, like a cafeteria tray or a trashcan lid or the hood of a VW and we would break our necks sometimes. 

Even our official sledding implements were super dangerous.  My family had a 6-person toboggan.  There was no controlling or turning these things.  You just went until you crashed into something.  I can remember falling off the toboggan mid run and getting my foot caught in the rope and being dragged down the hill at high velocity on my face. 

We had these things called ‘flying saucers’ that were plastic disks that you sat in.  They had no steering or padding or anything.  You just went until you wrecked. 

But the pros had sleds.  The old Flexible Flyer.  You sanded down and waxed up the steel runners.  Then you hauled ass down the hill face first on the sled.  You could steer them a little bit and at high enough velocity you could sort of Tokyo drift around the corners. 

Anyhow, that was what I was reminiscing about as I wrapped up my 18.6 miles.  I had not planned to run a 30K.  I was just running by time.  It was serendipity.  Felt pretty good.  Didn’t eat the whole sandwich.  Wasn’t sore on Sunday.  Ran an hour with my buddies the next day. 

Good weekend effort. 

Work being so crazy and time consuming reminds me of another story.  This one is a SCUBA story.  Anyone know what SCUBA stands for?  Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus.

In my 20’s I used to go diving for lobsters off Halibut Point in Gloucester.  I had a bunch of hand-me-down SCUBA stuff.  But we never went deep and never more than one 80 tank.  So we really couldn’t get into too much trouble. 

I remember one afternoon; my buddy Keith and I went out.  We had to hike a bit out through the state park to get to the shore.  It’s a good place to lobster dive because the shore is rocky and drops off quickly to 30-40 feet. And by rocky, I mean big chunks of granite. Like refrigerator size. 

To get to the water you had to climb down the rocks and jump in.   Now, if any of you know anything about SCUBA diving you know there’s a bunch of equipment involved.   You have the tank.  A hose comes off the tank and connects to the thing you put in your mouth, called a regulator.  The regulator allows you to breath off of the tank.

Then you have your mask with a snorkel attached. 

The water in the Atlantic off of Gloucester is pretty cold, even in the summer, like 60’s.  So you have a wet suit. You wear fins so you can propel yourself.  All good so far.

But the part that non-SCUBA folks don’t get is that you need buoyancy regulation.  Any of you triathletes know that if you have a wetsuit on you float.  With the whole point of SCUBA being the underwater stuff you need some way to overcome the floating of the wetsuit. 

The way you do this is to strap a bunch of medieval looking lead weights to a belt around your waste.  The lead makes you sink.  Which creates the opposite problem because you don’t’ want to get stuck on the bottom. What you want is to find that perfect buoyancy where you neither float, nor synch. 

This is where you have that last piece of critical equipment, the Buoyancy Compensator.  This is like an inflatable life vest you wear. 

So, the way it works is, you inflate your BC – Buoyancy Compensator, jump in, snorkel out to where you want to dive, because you want to save your air for the dive.  Then you put your regulator in and start deflating you BC until you sink.  Easy peasy.

I remember on this day the weather wasn’t great and the surf was pretty high.  Pounding on those rocks.  Makes it a bit tricky to get into the water.  You have to get in, put your head down, use the fins and power out through the surf.

Which is what I started to do as Keith was on the rocks behind me.   

It didn’t take long for me to realize that I had forgotten to inflate my BC.  So, instead of snorkeling out through the surf, I was snorkeling straight to the bottom with 35 pounds of lead. 

Lucky for me, and I suppose you, I’m a pretty strong swimmer.  Because I panicked.  Nothing like in haling that first big gulp of sea water to put some adrenaline into the system. 

The smart thing to do in these situations is to drop your weight belt.  It’s got a quick release on it.  And then put your regulator in your mouth so you don’t drown. 

I didn’t do that.  I treaded water with 35 pound of lead in the washing machine surf until I could get some air in my BC.  The surf tore my mask off me.  I caught glimpses of Keith looking distraught trying to decide whether he should come in after me. 

And, not to spoil the story, I lived to tell the story.  We retrieved my mask and went back in to see if we could catch some dinner. 

But, that’s how I felt at my job this week.  Like I was treading water in the heavy surf with 35 pounds of lead.

But, I’m older now.  I don’t panic as much.  I’ve traded stoicism for panic. 

Here’s a tip for you.  You can download a translation of Marcus Aurelius’’ diary for free.   It’s basically his morning journal.  He was the last of the good emperors.  He was a stoic. 

And yes his son was Commodus, who, yes, liked to pretend he was a gladiator.  But, Russell Crowe did not kill him.  His wrestling partner Narcissus killed him. 

And finally to take you out, I heard a great piece of advice from the Olympic runner Alexi Pappas.  It’s the ‘rule of thirds’.  It says that if you look at any part of your life, whether it’s your work, your workouts or your relationships – a third of the time they are going to be good, another third of the time they are going to be OK, and the final third of the time they are going to be crappy. 

The key is to realize this when you’re in the crappy spots. 

For those of you who like math that would be a normal distribution. 

So my friends that is my race report for you this week.  What shall we call it?  The Lost Pirate 30K?  The Tired Turkey 30K?  The Old Man 30K?

Your choice.

We’ll see you out there.

 

 

Direct download: AMWT.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:07pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-448 – Dave McGillivray Boston Marathon to Covid Vaccination

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4448.mp3]
Link epi4448.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-448 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  How we doin?  Here we are flipping the page to February of 2021.  How about that? 

Big news from my side of the world, that being New England, is the cold.  Cold, cold, cold.   It was zero degrees F this morning. 

I just got back from 7ish miles in the woods with Ollie.  We waited until after lunch and the temp came up over 20.  Nice day, sunny, windless, cold.  It’s really good running in the trials right now.  With the freeze, the ground is nice and hard. 

We got a couple of light snowstorms earlier in the week, maybe 3-5 inches of fluffy snow.  With so much traffic in the trails these days it’s all packed down and hard and fast.  It’s only icy where the spring come up. 

I had a pretty good week of running coming off the end of the infected toe.  The antibiotics cleared the infection up.  I took a bout a week off, but was back on it this week.  I bought some silicone toe caps,  toe protect that toe while it heals.  They work really well for me.  For some people they fall off, but for my big toe they fit great and keep the toe safe. 

I got back to training.  Had a pretty good weekend, despite the cold weather.  Friday I did a set of long hills in the cold, which were awful while I was doing them, but when I looked at the data were a decent effort. 

Yesterday I did a long 16 miler in the trails.  Most of it was pretty sucky, but that’s how ultra training is supposed to go.  You run until it sucks and then you run more.  That’s the name of the game.  And Ollie and I knocked out another 7 just now so that’s close to 30 miles in 3 days.  That’s encouraging. 

I didn’t take Ollie yesterday for the long run.  I thought it might be too cold for him.  I didn’t want to chance him hurting his feet.  For myself, I had to figure out how to carry water.  The challenge with this weather is that your bottles freeze in under an hour in any handheld. And the bite valves freeze even faster on your packs. 

What I ended up doing was wearing my Aonjiie vest with the two 500ML bite valve bottles under my outer layer.  I had my phone in an inner layer as well.  That worked well.  The bite valves didn’t freeze and I could unzip my outer layer to get a drink.  

I brought an old spring energy recovery gel from my ultra-bag; that bag where I keep all the ultra stuff, for fuel.  But when I opened it up at the halfway point it tasted like it had gone bad.  So – basically 3 hours in the cold with no fuel.  My balaclava froze to my head.   But I got it done and felt fine today. 

After the antibiotics and taking a week off I was noticeable chubby so I’ve been watching my food this week and have already knocked 5 pounds off. 

Today we chat with out old friend, director of the Boston Marathon, Dave McGillivray.  He is a case study in resilience and the power of a positive attitude.   This pandemic knocked his business of race directing right out from under him.  He had to pivot.  And he did.  He’s now running the vaccinations at Fenway and Gillette stadium.

Of course we also sneak in some Boston Marathon talk. 

In section one I’m going to talk about what to expect and how to counter the effects of aging as an athlete and in section two I’ll talk about work stress. 

Because I’ve had a really stressful week of work.   And I got through it.  Next week might be worse or better – but I’ll get through it. 

I try to show up with a positive attitude, have empathy and lead as best I can.  I also know I’m not going to get everything done and I make choices about what to not get done based on what’s important to me. 

Getting my workouts in is important to me. Writing and communicating is important to me. 

You, you’re important to me. 

We’re in this together right?  That’s what they keep telling me anyhow…

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

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Section one – The Aging Athlete - http://runrunlive.com/the-aging-athlete

Voices of reason – the conversation

DAVE MCGILLIVRAY– DMSE Sports

 

https://www.dmsesports.com/about

 

WHEN DAVE MCGILLIVRAY FOUNDED DMSE SPORTS IN A MEDFORD, MA, STOREFRONT IN 1981, RUNNING WAS KNOWN AS JOGGING, WICKING MATERIAL WAS A TERRY CLOTH HEADBAND, AND SPORTS DRINKS AND RUNNING SHOES WERE IN THEIR INFANCY.

 

OUR MISSION

DMSE Sports is an industry leader in event management operations and logistics. From road races to charity walks, we pride ourselves on producing safe and technically excellent events by creating trusted relationships, paying attention to every detail, and executing flawlessly. DMSE strives to produce the highest-caliber experience, whether consulting on existing events or building and managing them from the ground up.

 

OUR COMMITMENT

Black Lives Matter.

 

We at DMSE Sports have always supported that sentiment internally, but stayed silent externally. However, we  want to be part of the change for good, and to do that, we recognize it’s necessary to speak out and stand in solidarity with those who are fighting for equality and racial justice.

 

It’s time we become better allies. To externalize our internal anti-racist beliefs, to learn from those who have lived the experiences, to listen when they point to injustices and prejudice. Black and brown lives matter, and they deserve to have an equal opportunity for happiness, success, and long life.

 

As a start, we will be donating all funds raised by the DMSE Foundation during the Medford2Medford race to organizations that directly support communities of color.

 

This is just the beginning of DMSE's effort to effect real change. We know we have a long road ahead.

 

OUR EVENTS

The company and its 75+ consultants manage more than 30 major road races and charitable events per year, including:

 

New Balance Falmouth Road Race

 

Eversource Walk for Boston Children’s Hospital

 

Camp Harborview Citython 5K

 

Run to Home Base

 

Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk

 

Delta Dental Mount Washington Road Race

 

BAA Half-Marathon

 

BAA Boston Marathon

 

lululemon San Diego 10K

 

TD Beach to Beacon

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon

 

BAA 5K

 

Feaster Five Thanksgiving Day Run

 

Harvard Pilgrim Finish at the Fifty at Patriot Place

 

BAA 10K

 

“There are 3 rules I never break—No questions asked. 1) Call my mom back within an hour. 2) Tell someone every day that I love them. 3) Always say yes to Dave McGillivray.”

— DAVID BROWN, CHIEF ADVANCEMENT OFFICER OF THE MASSACHUSETTS ASSOCIATION FOR THE BLIND & VISUALLY IMPAIRED

THE EARLY YEARS

Since 1981, DMSE has organized or consulted on more than 1,000 events, raising millions for charity and earning a reputation as one of the most thorough, well organized race management firms in the U.S.

 

DMSE’s first event – the Bay State Triathlon at Wright’s Pond in Medford, Mass. – attracted 100 participants and was one of the first triathlons ever held in New England and the nation. McGillivray had competed in the 1980 Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii and brought the concept back to his native Northeast. A triathlete for years, McGillivray competed in eight Ironman triathlons and introduced the inspirational father-son team of Rick and Dick Hoyt to the sport. In January of 2011, he was inducted into the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame.

 

Triathlons were just the beginning for DMSE. As the group organized more athletic events, McGillivray and his staff quickly earned a reputation as detail minded, safety oriented and creative thinkers in the competitive arena of event management. In 1988, the B.A.A Boston Marathon noticed and appointed McGillivray technical director of the world-famous marathon, and in 2001 he was appointed race director – a title he still holds today.

 

PICKING UP SPEED

As DMSE grew, McGillivray added to his team, hand picking the best in start and finish line management, lead vehicle programs, runner registration and results, while working with local volunteers, race committees and police and fire departments to create a smooth operation come race day. So when Olympic Gold Medalist Joan Benoit Samuelson had an idea for a road race in her hometown of Cape Elizabeth, Maine, she reached out to McGillivray and his team.  The TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K was launched in 1998 and is now among the most popular on the U.S. road race circuit, attracting some of the world’s fastest elite athletes and drawing rave reviews from participants.

 

Others noticed as well. From the Bellin Run in Green Bay, Wisconsin and the Lady Speed Stick® Women's Half Marathon Series throughout the U.S. to Run to Home Base at Fenway Park and Run For The Dream in Williamsburg, Va., a DMSE race is known for being safe, organized, technically advanced and produced without flaws. No wonder that in 2000, McGillivray and his team received the prestigious Race Director of the Year award from Road Race Management. 

 

MAINTAINING THE PACE

In 2014, DMSE added another high-profile event to the portfolio as the team was brought on to manage the Across the Bay 10K in Annapolis, MD, which has had more than 20,000 runners in each of the first two years!

 

PHILANTHROPY

DMSE Sports also is a pioneer in what is now one of the most important aspects of the athletic industry – combining athletics with philanthropy. Nearly every DMSE endeavor has that unbeatable combination of fitness and fundraising, giving back to the Jimmy Fund and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, Lazarus House and many others.

 

MILESTONES

DMSE has been involved with more than 900 major events over the 30+years, but here are a few highlights:

 

1980 Dave McGillivray Running and Sports Center opens in Medford, Massachusetts

 

1981 Dave McGillivray Sports Enterprises (DMSE) is born, sets up offices in Medford

 

1982 DMSE directs first triathlon, the Bay State Triathlon at Spot Pond in Medford

 

1983 DMSE produces Cape Cod Endurance Triathlon, first Ironman-distance triathlon in the continental U.S.

 

1984 Dave McGillivray Sports Enterprises, Inc. is incorporated, April 19, 1984

 

1988 DMSE is hired as the Technical Coordinator of the BAA Boston Marathon.

 

1989 DMSE manages Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk

 

1990 DMSE directs the Triathlon World Championship at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida

 

1993 DMSE manages Feaster Five Thanksgiving Day Road Race in Andover, Massachusetts

 

1996 DMSE assists with 100th running of the B.A.A. Boston Marathon with a record 38,000+ official entrants

 

1996 DMSE consultants hired to assist with venue management of all road events for Atlanta Olympic Games

 

1998 DMSE directs Goodwill Games Triathlon in New York City

 

1998 DMSE asked by Olympic Gold Medalist Joan Samuelson to manage the first TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K (then the People Beach to Beacon 10K)

 

2003 DMSE creates its own foundation: The DMSE Children’s Fitness Foundation

 

2004 DMSE manages USA Women’s Marathon Olympic Trials in St. Louis

 

2008 DMSE assists BAA in managing USA Women’s Marathon Olympic Trial in Boston, Massachusetts

 

2010 DMSE launches four new races – Spring Training 10K Classic in Jupiter, Florida; Run to Home Base at Fenway Park in Boston; Harvard Pilgrim 10K at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough; and the Run Gloucester 7-Mile Race in Gloucester

 

2010 DMSE Foundation launches “Running in Places” program for Boston-area school children

 

2010 DMSE hired as consultant to the Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon

 

2010 DMSE hired to manage 2011 Run for the Dream half marathon in Williamsburg, Virginia, and 2011 Mt. Washington Road Race

 

2011 DMSE celebrates "30 Years Running" March 12 with more than 450 dignitaries, consultants, and athletes; DMSE hired to serve as the race director of the New Balance Falmouth Road Race in Cape Cod in time for its 40th running

 

2013 DMSE manages the 25th Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk

 

2014 DMSE assists with the Across the Bay 10K in Annapolis, Maryland

 

2015 DMSE hired to direct the USA Invitational Half Marathon in San Diego, California

 

2016 DMSE manages the Runner's World Half & Festival in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

 

2017 DMSE celebrates 20 years of managing the TD Beach to Beacon in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

 

2017 DMSE hired to manage the inaugural Fenway Park Marathon

 

Section two – Managing Work Stress - http://runrunlive.com/surviving-work-stress

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have lined up in the parking lot between the barriers to get our shots through the end of  Episode 4-448 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  

So I watched “the Dig’ on Netflix.  I’ve been excited to see it.  Because I’m a big history buff.  And if you don’t know ‘the Dig’ is a period piece about the excavation of an Anglo Saxon ship burial in Sutton Hoo, on the coast of Suffolk in England.   

I won’t disparage the program but I was hoping for some archaeology and it turns out it’s more like ‘the English Patient’.  Lots of feelings and relationships and very little actual Anglo Saxon.   They don’t even show the helmet or mention king Raedwald.  So if you like British period dramas go for it.  If you like archeology, not so much.

The other wonderful discovery I’ve made in the last couple weeks are some very entertaining science fiction podcasts. Since I have my own “After the Apocalypse” podcast now – which you should go like and comment remember – I did some searching and found some others to listen too. 

There are three I’ve been listening to on my runs.  The first is Asimov’s Science fiction podcast that reads stories form Asimov’s magazine.  The second is Light Speed Podcast, another science fiction story podcast.  And finally my favorite is Clarkesworld science fiction.  I think I like that one the most because the editor always sounds exhausted.  <Links in the notes. >

They are all nice, little 20-30 minute chunk-size stories.  Perfect company for running in the dark, snowy trails.  Some are better than others.  The good ones make the so-so ones worth it. 

Other than that I’m working my way through a Jimmy Buffet novel called “A Salty Patch of Land” which is refreshingly easy to digest.  A bit of a palette cleanser – so to speak.  Cowboys, boats, lighthouses – typically breezy Jimmy Buffet style.  Cringe-worthy at time but unapologetic.

And that’s what I have for you this week. A decent week.  The days are getting longer fast now.  4+ minutes a day.  The vaccinations are rolling out.  We might even be getting on airplanes and gettiggn back out into the world soon. 

Stay warm.  Stay strong.  Be a leader,

And I’ll see you out there.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4448.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 6:21pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-447 – Mental Health in Lockdown – Dr. Sarb

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4447.mp3]
Link epi4447.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-447 of the RunRunLive podcast.   Here we are, the middle of January and I’ve got a lot to talk about today.  Which is good, because one of the things that bothers me about house arrest is that I don’t get enough experiential input.  I’m not out traveling and running races so I have less input, less to talk about. 

I had to take a week off from running last week.  I managed to give myself an infected toe.  I’ll talk about that in Section One.  It’s better now and I went out for an hour in the trails yesterday.  It seems to be ok.  I’m a week into a course of antibiotics and that seems to have cleared it up. 

The good news is that I’m not going to die a slow painful death from gangrene.  The bad news is that I lost a week of training and I had to take a course of antibiotics.  I don’t like taking antibiotics.  IT wipes out all the helpful and friendly bacteria in your body as well as the cantankerous buggers living in your cuticles. 

The antibiotics mess up my digestion, especially with my diet that includes a lot of roughage.  It basically gives me the digestive system of a Canadian goose.  It also compounds the dry skin I get this time of year.  I think in general we underestimate all the helpful things that a community of symbiotic bacteria do for you. 

Today we’re going to talk to Dr. Sarb. I’ve ‘known’ Dr. Sarb for many years from the online running community. He’s a New Zeeland based psychologist and is just now putting out a book about how to survive the Covid.  I had some tech problems and had to cut him short so I had him send me a preamble which I’ll stick on the front of the interview. 

By the way why is it called New Zeeland?  Doesn’t that imply an Old Zeeland? Isn’t this a British colony? Zeeland isn’t very British. 

In fact the is an old Zeeland and it’s north of Amsterdam in the Netherlands.  The first people to ‘discover’ what would become New Zeeland were Dutch.  Specifically a dude named Abel Tasman.  Yup, that’s how you get Tasmania.  At the time he thought he had run into Argentina.  His GPS must not have been charged. 

Anyhow, subsequently the Dutch thought, hey, this place is made up of islands like Zeeland, which in old Dutch means “Sea Land” and so you have New Zeeland. 

 

In section two I’ll talk about living life like it’s improvisational art. 

At the risk of being the crazy old etymologist, I want you to think about the word ‘compassion’.  It’s a good old Latin word.  The first bit means ‘with’ the second bit means ‘suffering’.  Having compassion means the ability to understand and feel another’s pain and suffering. 

“With Suffering”.  At this point most writers will go off on a screed about how you have to suffer for what you want.  How passion is the ability to suffer for a goal. 

I’m not going to do that, although it’s a great screed.  Very biblical.  Has the smell of ancient empires and codes of honor to it.  Unsurprising it’s Roman in origin. 

I’m going to talk about having compassion for someone else.  Understanding and appreciating someone else’s suffering.   If you think about anyone you know, live with or work with – to some extent they are all suffering.  Whether they show it or not. 

And the ones that are suffering the most are the one’s that are the hardest to have empathy for.  Because they are typically externalizing that suffering in ways that are negative. 

It doesn’t mean you have to agree with them. It doesn’t mean you have to like them.  It doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be held accountable.  It means you understand their suffering. 

This is important because people who are suffering tend to externalize that suffering.  They lash out.  They act out. 

It is in our nature to suffer.  It is in our nature to be passionate.  It makes us human. 

Passion by it’s nature is irreconcilable with the norm.  Passionate people are outliers in one way or another. 

If you can bring yourself to look for the suffering behind another’s actions it will help you understand them.  It will help your own suffering because it will allow you to understand.  Understanding converts emotion to reason. 

And with that reason you are in a better position to deal with those who are suffering. 

But compassion also means celebrating those who are achieving happiness.  It is part of empathy and growth. 

When was the last time you told someone you were happy for them? Try saying this in a moment of contemplation while visualizing someone you know who has achieved something that has made them happy.

Because that empathy for others happiness begets joy in yourself.

Now try saying this: "May I have appreciation for my own joy. May my happiness grow." And notice how that makes you feel and how the two are intertwined. 

On with the show!

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – The infected Toe - http://runrunlive.com/the-infected-toe

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Dr. Sarb Johal  – Mental Health in Covid

https://sarbjohal.com/about/

 https://sarbjohal.com/book/

 

I’m Dr Sarb Johal.

I’m a clinical psychologist, consultant, speaker, and media commentator with an insatiable curiosity about this human experience.

 

Over my 30-year career in psychology, I’ve been privileged to work alongside many brilliant minds producing phenomenal psychological research into the way our brains work.

 

The problem is that very little of this incredible work filters down in a useful way to the people it could really help. Ordinary people trying to sustain relationships, bring up kids, hold down a job, lead a team or an organisation, make a contribution and generally do life well. In other words, all of us.

 

Until now.

Through my videos, podcasts, consulting and speaking, I uncover and interpret the latest psychological research from experts around the globe, transforming complex concepts into useful insights that help individuals, leaders and organisations navigate this ever-changing world.

 

Section two – Life as Improv - http://runrunlive.com/life-is-performance-art

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have holed up in our home offices for almost an entire year, and most certainly,  through the end of Episode 4-447 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  

I’ve got a couple stories for you to take you out, but first remember to go listen to my new podcast the apocalypse serial “After the Apocalypse”.  Like it, write a review, forward it to your friends and share it on social, please. 

It was a busy week back at work.  This seemed to be the week when everyone showed back up from vacation looking to get stuff done. Since I wasn’t running it was weirdly ok because I had one less thing to do.  I’ve been at this new job for a year now, so I guess I have to stop calling it a new job.  I’m grateful to have made the decision to move back into a bigger company. 

Doesn’t’ look like we’ll be getting out of lock down any time soon.  I’m eyeballing a April event but not sure I’ll want to get on a plane and not sure I’ll be able to visit the home office.  I’m also feeling a weird “maybe I don’t have what it takes to run an ultra anymore” feeling.  I only made it through a  week of heavier training before I broke myself this time.

I guess I’m feeling a bit mortal which isn’t a great feeling.  Maybe it has something to do with the psychology of the Apocalypse. 

Ironically my new pair of Hokas showed up the same day I had to go to the clinic for the infected toe.  I down graded to the Challenger ATR’s from the SpeedGoat’s. I just can’t stomach paying $180 for a pair of shoes.  These new Challengers seem much lighter than the older versions.  The outsole seems stiffer too.  And of course the toe-box is a bit roomier!

I did end up partially breaking those $30 UBI Bluetooth headphones.  I say partially, because the left ear still works, which is actually ok for podcasts.  Might be a million dollar idea there folks – make an athletic version of those single ear-piece Bluetooth headphones. 

Let me take you out with a home-office story.  And it might be a little unsettling for those of you with an aversion to rodents.  So there are mousetraps involved, if that’s triggering for you, you might want to skip ahead. 

One of the mornings this week I carry my coffee and avocado toast up to my office to read the news on my computer, like I do most mornings.  I notice, what I think are sesame seeds from the toast on the pad in front of the keyboard.  And I almost drop them into my avocado, before I realize they are mouse turds. 

It’s been a low-mouse invasion year because we got the new garage doors in December.  But I left them open last weekend whilst clearing snow.  (how many people do you know that use the word ‘Whilst’?)

Anyhow, I think “crap, there’s a mouse living in my office crawling around on my desk eating my breakfast crumbs. 

So, I set a couple traps along the baseboard and kept my day going.

Then my big-boss calls, can you be on this call in 15 minutes where the corporate blah, blah, is talking about blah, blah.  OK, I can do that, luckily I’m showered and dressed at this point. 

So I’m at my stand up desk, on the video call, acting like I have some sort of intelligence, knowledge and authority – when ‘Snap!’ the trap goes off about a foot and a half from where I’m standing.  But, it doesn’t kill the mouse right away. 

So, I’m stuck talking to these people on this video call while the mouse is thrashing about on the floor next to me.   They never knew. 

Say what you want about this remote work, it comes with new experiences. 

I think the biggest challenge of extended home arrest is the sameness of it.  The ground-hog day nature of it.  But that can be comforting too.   It can lead you to feel uninspired and pointless.  And when that happens I think we just have to keep moving.  Like Dr. Sarb suggests you have to make up rules that simplify things for your over-taxed brain. 

One I’ve found useful is to commit blocks of time.  30 minutes is a good block of time when you’re having trouble focusing.  Shift the focus from, “I need to do this thing” to I’m going to work on this one task for 30 minutes non-stop.  The old Pomadoro Method.  Adds structure. 

I’ve rejoined Twitter after a few years away.  As always I’m cyktrussell.  I’ve got about 13,000 followers.  I tweet about running stuff.  I retweet from the back-catalogue of 1,000 plus articles I’ve written on my website RunRunLive.com.  I mostly make snide comments and tweet Grateful Dead Lyrics. 

Follow me and we’ll exchange snark.

Ok my friends, whether you feel like a Rockstar or the mouse, let’s make 2021 the best year yet by showing up and doing the work and bringing the joy.

And, hopefully,  I will see you out there.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4447.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:47pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-446 – Running the World with Nick Butter

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4446.mp3]
Link epi4446.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-446 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

Here we are at the start of a new year!  How about that?  2021.  Happy new year.

Today we have a chat with Nick Butter that I recorded a couple weeks ago.  Nick has recently run a marathon in every country in the world, so you may hear him making the rounds of the podcasts.  I’m always a little hesitant to interview folks that come off on the surface as a bit self-promotional. 

But, as you’ll hear in the interview, Nick is a thoughtful, honest runner.  It’s another one of these stories that’s good for the new year.  Another, chuck everything and do something big, story.  

I’m looking out the window of my home office as I write this and it is just about freezing.  There is a covering of icy snow on the ground.  Yesterday we got one of those slush storms where it’s warmish and snowing and raining at the same time.  I went out with Ollie for a couple hours in the slush in the trails which was fun.

I told you about how Ollie likes to ambush me.  He’ll come running directly at me, hit the brakes, snap and growl and take off growling with a stick.  I have managed to avoid getting bitten since we last talked.  (Although, he did spear me from behind with a pine tree one day this week.)   

So, yesterday we’re out running in the slush and he comes tearing down the trail straight at me, throws on the brakes, but because there’s two inches of slush, he can’t get any traction and slides straight through me like a ball through a bowling pin.  I went down on top of him and got nice an slushy. 

I know sounds funny now, but I was pretty mad at the time. 

Now all the slush is frozen.  It’s going to be dicey out in the trails today. My shoes are wet from yesterday so I’ll have to switch to an old pair. 

I’ve started training a bit.  My plan is to be in 50 mile shape for the end of April.  Today will cap a pretty big week for me.   Ran a ½ marathon on the roads with the club on Sunday, 7ish in the trails Tuesday, 8ish in the trails Wednesday, a 10 X 60 second hill repeat set on Friday, 10ish slush miles yesterday and I’ll get another 7ish trail mile in today – so mid 40 miles for the 7 days and over 50 for 8 days. 

In section one we’ll talk about how to build a spring training plan.  In section two I’ll give you one of the finished episodes of my new apocalypse podcast – so you can hear what I’ve been putting my energy into over the last couple weeks.

 

I’m not going to talk about New Year’s resolutions.  But I will talk a little bit about attitude in the outro. 

I thin 2021 is going to be a interesting year.  After all of use being artificially tamped down for 2020, 2021 should be a barn-burner!

I would counsel you to be prepared.  To take these slow times around the holidays to plan and reflect.  Because every thing that happens is an opportunity.  The failures as well as the successes teach us something – if we’re willing to learn.

I’ve often quoted Teddy Roosevelt’s “Man in the Arena” speech.  You’ve heard it.  It’s famous.  Teddy Roosevelt was a real character.  He’s on Mount Rushmore with Lincoln, Washington and Jefferson.  Which is a bit strange if you think about it. What’s this dude from the early 1900’s doing up on the mountain with the founders and the great emancipator?

This little squirrelly guy with the squeaky voice.  We know he had a squeaky voice because this was around the time that audio recordings started to be made. 

You know how Teddy got to be president?  He was such a pain in the ass they made him Vice President to get him out of the way.  Basically, they buried him in a do-nothing job so he couldn’t cause any trouble. 

Then an anarchist put a bullet in McKinley and the rest is history. 

You have to be ready for your moments.  2021 could be your moment.

On with the show!

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – 2021 training plans - http://runrunlive.com/spring-2021-training-plans-start-your-engines

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Nick Butter  – Every Country in the World

Yasmin Li

Manager to Nick Butter

Contact number: +44 7772 870069

Sponsorships and Partnerships email: management@nickbutter.com

Speaking Events email: speakerbookings@nickbutter.com

--

Nick Butter

British Endurance Athlete | Motivational Speaker | Adventurer

Contact number: +44 7745 291591

nick@nickbutter.co.uk | www.nickbutter.com | www.runningtheworld196.com

Twitter and Instagram: @nickbutterrun

Expedition Highlight Reel: https://vimeo.com/368565548/b64acede4d 

PRE-ORDER NICK'S BOOK - Running The World: My World-Record Breaking Adventure to Run a Marathon in Every Country on Earth

Waterstones - https://bit.ly/2Ql9dor

Amazon - https://amzn.to/355fada

 

 

Section two – after the Apocalypse - http://www.aftertheapocalypse.me

 

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have run a marathon in every country, on every grain of sand in the world, through the end of Episode 4-445 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  You think we’ll live long enough to see some folks run marathons on other worlds?  

So that’s my new apocalypse podcast.  Go find by searching for after the apocalypse on iTunes or whatever your favorite podcast app is.  This one cost me real money to make so I need to drive the download numbers.  Even if you hate it and want to have nothing to do with it, go out a subscribe to it and download it. If you want to help, like it, write a review send it to a couple friends. I’m enjoying the creative process. 

Thoughts on 2020

Many people are saying 2020 was a ‘bad’ year.  I’m not sure there is such a thing as a bad year.  Labeling anything good or bad is just way to justify our own response to it.  And that’s the interesting thing about it – because our response is the only thing we can really control. 

When we say 2020 was a bad year what we’re really saying is 2020 was a year in which our response to external events was bad. 

What would change if instead of labeling ‘good’ or ‘bad’ we just took things for what they were?  2020 wasn’t ‘good’ or ‘bad’ it just was. 

2020 was certainly different. It caused an abrupt cessation or change to many of our longstanding routines and habits.  I would wager that with every routine lost, the seed of a new routine was planted.

People stopped driving to work.  That routine was lost.  Maybe it was replaced with going for a walk before work in the morning, with the dog or the spouse.  Was that a good or a bad change?

Surely, we lost people with the virus.  Surely, we lost jobs.  But are we not the type of animals that respond to challenges and change?  Doesn’t this type of abrupt, structural change cause us to look deeply inwards and ask better questions? 

One thing became clear to me in 2020.  There are an infinite number of things that are out of my control.  And if I let those things bother me or control me or chew up my valuable time then I’m a chump. 

There are things that are squarely in my control.  Where I spend my precious energy and time is under my control.  Somewhat, I’m still boxed in on many fronts by the decisions I’ve made along the way.  But that doesn’t mean I have to acquiesce.  That just means I choose to.  Call it sunk cost or pain avoidance but there are certain things I’m locked into, and I chose to be locked into. 

A big, big, big thing that is under my control is how I show up.  Everything in life rewards you disproportionately for how you show up.  To quote a famous fantasy novel, “We reap what we sow.” This is typically applied to the actions of individuals, but I think it applies better to how we show up.

If we show p with hate and anger, then we are going to reap hate and anger.

If we show up with fear and hesitancy, then we are going to reap suspicion and distrust.

If we show up with disinterest and torpor, we are going to be shown the door.

But, my friends, it is totally under your control. 

If we show up with energy and positivity and a belief in the future and a story about a better place, then we are going to reap the enthusiasm and trust of everyone we meet. 

And with that we bid goodbye to 2020.  2020 was a game-changing year.  2020 enabled me to spend time at home with my new dog and my old wife.  2020 gave me space to explore the trails.  2020 allowed me to inject some new creativity into my life. 

2020 brought perspective to where I am and where I’m going.

2020 reminded me of the things I’m grateful for. 

2020 started with me taking on the challenge of a new job.  I feel quite blessed looking back that I was able to be part of an organization and help navigate these unchartered waters.  That, I think, was a serendipitous use of my experience and mindset. 

In 2021 I vow to set new goals in all the important areas of my life.  To plan and execute to the best of my abilities.  But, most of all to show up.  To bring my best self to every day. 

And I will see you out there!

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4446.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 5:22pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-445 – The Hong Kong Running Scene with Mark Agnew

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4445.mp3]
Link epi4445.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-445 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

How are we doing?  By the time this podcast tickles your inner ears it will be the shortest day of the year up here in New England. 

It might even be that “After the holidays” scenario when someone bought you a new audio device or phone and you have downloaded some podcasts and you’re listening in to see what you like and sure enough you find this weird old dude who runs a lot and has a dog and rambles on and on and on about things that no one really cares about and then says something like, “Hey that was a 71 word sentence!”

Vladimir Nabokov would be proud!

Yup you new listeners can bail out now because it doesn’t’ get any better.

This week we talk to Mark Agnew who is the extreme sports reporter in Hong Kong for the South China Morning Post.  No kidding a real, honest to goodness ex-patriot living in Hong Kong and covering the ultra-running scene.  Super interesting. 

In section one we talk about running in the snow, because, yeah, I’ve been running in the snow.  Write about what you know is what someone said, so there you have it. 

In section two I’m going to talk about the importance of a positive aspect.  Now Aspect is not a good old English word.  It is from Latin.  You might recognize that Latin root ‘Spec’.  As in Spectacles.  So Aspect means “to look” or in the case I’m using it “appearance”.

Anyhow…  It’s been an uneventful couple of weeks since we last spoke.  I had a good higher volume week and got 5 runs in.  I did them all on the trails with Ollie so it only added up to 30 something miles but if I had been running those on the roads it would have been over 40 miles for the week.

We got a nice big dump of dry snow this week.  Somewhere around a foot and a half.  It’s hard to tell because the storm had 30+ MPH winds so the snow wasn’t evenly distributed. I haven’t been out running in this new snow yet, but I have gone for a couple hikes with Ollie and it is hard going!

It got cold and stayed cold. Woke up to 3 degrees Fahrenheit this morning.  It’s amazing how fast you adapt to the cold weather.   It’s so dry and so bright with the snow down.  It’s also acoustically amazing.  You can hear sounds traveling for miles in the dry air.   

The coyotes were out last night singing in the woods.  Clear as a bell. Ollie was freaking out.  He wanted to get out of the house and have a go at them.  Or join them maybe.  He is a bit of a free spirit.

That son of a gun has taken to ambushing me on the trails again.  It’s a border collie thing.  Buddy, my old dog did it too.  But Ollie is a bit aggressive. He’ll pounce on me and give me a nip if I’m not paying attention.  He’s not trying to hurt me but his big old velociraptor jaws are leaving me with vampire bites on my thighs.

I’ve taken to carrying a small stick with me so I can swat him when he moves in for an ambush.  What the southerners would call a switch.  Maybe I’m bringing back some bad memories of someone having a switch taken to them.

“Switch” is an old German word.  Means long thin stick.  Maybe I should have used the word ‘crop’ like a riding crop.  “Crop” is another old German word.  I think we’re seeing a pattern.  Lots of swatting going on with those old Germans. 

But anyhow I can give him a little swat and it keeps him from biting me. 

I read an article about a woman who died from a dog bite.  She got the flesh eating bacteria!.  Yikes. 

But what I’m really worried about is turning into a were-collie.  (by the way ‘were’ is Algo Saxon for ‘man’ – so were-wolf is literally ‘man-wolf’)

If I were to turn into a were-collie, some morning of the full, collie moon, I might awaken with an urge to go on long runs in the woods, and chase a frisbee, and get my belly rubbed, and roll in dead animals, and have an odd fascination for sheep… Hey wait a second…

Oh my God! I’m a were-collie…

No, just kidding, that’s not true, I hardly ever roll in dead animals.

On with the show!

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – Snow Running - http://runrunlive.com/snow-running

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Mark Agnew – Sports Journalist from Hong Kong

https://www.scmp.com/author/mark-agnew

Outdoor and Extreme Sports Editor

Mark Agnew joined the Post in 2017 to capture the booming extreme sports scene in Hong Kong. He has been involved in outdoor and extreme sports his whole life. Since living in Hong Kong, his interest has expanded to endurance sports, including ultra-running and long distances ocean rowing.

Areas of Expertise: Outdoor and extreme sports

Languages Spoken: English

 

 

Section two – Positive Aspect- http://runrunlive.com/positive-aspect

 

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have run up the side of Mt. Victoria through the end of Episode 4-445 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  We can take the tram down. 

Got a lot of gear to review for you today. 

First, I invested in a new pair of Hokas.  The Clifton 6.  These are road shoes.  I’ve worn them a couple times and I love, love, love them.  Haven’t done more than 8 miles but they are super comfy and easy to run in. 

Second thing is I have been testing my new light.  Remember I told you about this light.  It’s the keyword rich one I got from Amazon for 24 bucks.  (big inhale) West Biking Night Running Lights, USB Rechargeable Chest Light with 90° Adjustable Beam Angle, 500 Lumens Waterproof Ultra Bright Safety Warning Lamp with Reflective Straps for Runner Jogger Camping (big exhale)

Nabokov would not be proud. 

It works great!  It’s USB, so no batteries and as long as you remember to charge it, it is super bright.  The main light sits in the middle of your chest like the headlight on a train and lights up the road or trail without you having to hold anything.  It’s got a red safety light on the back.  The main light can be tilted up or down and has two brightness settings. 

I like the brightness and the hands free aspect.  The only thing I found that is minorly annoying is that since it is fixed, you have to turn your whole body if there is something not directly in front of you that you want to aluminate.  And since there is only one shoulder strap it tends to cant to one side a bit and you end up adjusting it every so often to bring it back to center. 

The final thing was that pair of keyword rich gloves I got.  I’m using them but they are nothing special.  They’re not warm enough and I’ve already torn them during a fall. 

Ollie and I have kept on exploring the trails in town and hooked in a couple new ones last week.  It’s fun to explore. 

Now my other big news and where I’m going to blatantly ask for your help, is my new apocalypse podcast.  I’ve rewritten and added to the narrative of the old man in the apocalypse and created a new podcast called After the Apocalypse. 

I’m releasing it as a serial.  There will be a new chapter each week and the whole season will be a coherent narrative arc. 

This one is going up on a site called Acast.  I’ve put a trailer up as a place holder and the first episodes will be dropping in January.  If you go to Aftertheapocalypse.me you’ll be directed to the Acast site.

I’ve hired a professional voice actor to be my narrator and it sounds great.  I had some artwork made and original music as well.  I’m really excited about this project.

What I need form you is, when the podcast is live, go leave a review on one of the podcast sites, and share it with your friends.  I set up a Patreon page as well so if you’d like to help our survivors in the apocalypse you can go there and become a patron.  That’s patreon/apocalypse.

Stayed tuned for more, but I think this is going to resonate with fans of that genre. 

And you might ask, “Hey Chris, don’t you have enough to do already?”  And you are right.  I have no excuse.  I am already too busy.  But, I listen to these athletes that I interview and they decide to do something.  To pitch their work a day lives and do something big.  Because they want to. 

I wanted to do this.  So I gave myself permission to do it.  To do the best I can, maybe not be perfect, but to let myself go ahead and do it without expectation for the shear joy of it. 

What is it that you always wanted to do but were too busy to do?  Or maybe you didn’t want to fail?  Or maybe you were afraid to succeed? 

You’re not getting any younger my friend.  Pitch it all and do something you want to do.  You deserve it.  You’ve been a good soldier.  Now do something you want to do and make the world a better place because of it!

I’ll leave you this week with a wonderful old anglo-Norman word.  Despair.  What does that mean? The prefix De is away or from.  Spair is from the old French meaning hope.  So Despair means to lose hope. 

But, did you know that there is another form of this word, that is seldom used?  Respair.  Not kidding.  That’s a real word, even though Microsoft Word disagrees with me.  And of course it means to restore hope. 

So use Respair in a sentence. 

And I will see you out there!

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4445.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 10:49am EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-444 – Tony runs LA with the podcast

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4444.mp3]
Link epi4444.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-444 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

How about that?  4 – 444 Seems like that should be some sort of celebration…

How many self-supported, amateur podcasts do you know of that make it to 444 episodes?  And that doesn’t include a couple dozen unofficial episodes! Coming up on 13 years in July. 

If I have time I’m going to revamp the show.  Like everyone else I’ve got more plans than time.  But, in a perfect world I need to reformat the show, build out a home studio to finally get some decent audio quality and replace my creaky old website. I’m afraid to touch that website.  It’s a house of cards! I’m not thrilled with the idea of poking at it. 

In the 12 years since we started podcasting the technology and the industry has changed and moved forward.  It’s time for me to catch up. 

But not today!

Today we speak with Tony, one of our loyal listeners from Las Angeles, the City of Angels.  Tony is a committed marathoner and a teacher in LA.  I wanted to meet and speak with him for a couple reasons.  First to see what the experience was like to binge listen through RunRunLive episodes but also to talk about how his discovery of distance running has influenced his teaching and life.

In section one I’ll talk about another Apocalypse idea to keep your training fresh. 

In section two I’ll talk about some yellow sticky notes you can use to survive another day in house arrest. 

Ollie and I are doing well.  We had a nice long break over the US Thanksgiving holiday.  The holiday was Thursday and most companies take Thursday and Friday, which mine did.  I also took Wednesday as one of my Volunteer Days that the company wants us to use. 

So a nice long, long weekend for me away from the zoom calls.  As you could probably hear in the last episode – I needed it!

On my volunteer day I took Ollie and hiked two of the trails in town.  You’ll hear more about that epiphany in section two.  I cleared some trees and picked up some trash.  All in all I think it was 5 hours of hiking to get all the various little bits of trail covered.  It was great! 

I did manage to break the haft off of the tang of my machete.  The reason I’m telling you this is that I like to use old words like ‘haft’ and ‘tang’ which are lovely old English words.  By old English I mean Germanic, Anglo Saxon, Norse.  Big hairy guys carrying spears and axes who knew their way around a haft and tang.

“Break” is a lovely old English word as well.  And interestingly, you’ll find many of the English words that deal with violence are of Norse origin, which I’m pointing out so I can use the phrase “Homicidal Gingers” again.  But where would we be without words like berserk, ugly, muck, skull, knife, die and cake?

Thursday, Thanksgiving morning, Ollie and I met our running buddies to run the course of the Ayer 5K.  We got there for an 8:00AM start.  Played the anthem.  Then jogged the course.  Tradition!   It was nice.

I actually ran everyday and if you include the trail hikes on volunteer Day I got 5 straight days in.  Which was s delight.  Since I was off from work I could go during the daylight.  Daylight is scarce right now in New England.  The sun comes up at 7:00 AM and sets at just after 4:00PM – so a scant 9 hours of daylight. 

I’m feeling ok.  I little heavy from all the beer I’ve been drinking in lockdown.  I’m a bit achy from just the season and my age – but I’m getting out.  Whatever I choose to train for in the spring is going to be an effort.  Going to have to get my volume and speed back up and loose some weight. 

The season for me is still busy but not as bad as it was before the Thanksgiving break.  Most of my customers go into their busy season in December so I don’t hear from them.  Still, I know it is hard this time of year for many people.  Especially this year with the challenges of the apocalypse and other wackiness. 

I would ask you to get outside yourself by trying to tune into others.  Reach out and ask people how they are doing.  Have that call with those people who need it, just to stay in touch.  Help someone out.  Give someone a compliment.  Do something for others. 

And that will make you feel better.  Because we are social creatures. 

On with the show,

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – Run every trail - http://runrunlive.com/running-every-trail

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Tony Martin – LA running and podcast bingeing

 

Brief bio: been a public high school teacher in South Central Los Angeles since 2007, been an endurance runner/student coach (for the LA marathon specifically) since 2012. As of 2012, have run around 60 full marathons, three 50ks, the San Francisco double marathon, currently leading in the "cannonball run" (virtual run across the U.S.). Sources of happiness are: noodling around on the classical guitar, prepping (and eating) vegan delights and, of course, all things running. 

 

As far as any links, my social media presence is next to nonexistent. Best bet is to keep an eye out on the local roads, but don't blink ;)

 

Thanks again, Chris. It was truly a pleasure to meet you and honor to be on the show.

-T

 

Section two – Sticky notes for the apocalypse- http://runrunlive.com/yellow-sticky-notes-for-the-apocalypse

 

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have binge listened through to the end of Episode 4-444 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  That’s it.  No more left.  Time to move on. 

Ollie and I have been exploring the trails around town on the weekends.  We went out on Saturday to a new trail. This one was called Mill Hill.  I had a plan.  Saturdays I do a lot of errand running. 

I got up and wrapped Christmas presents I’ve been accumulating on line and packaged them up for shipment.  Went off to the post office to ship them before they closed at noon.

Then did some yard cleanup. 

Because – the weather was forecasted to be challenging.  We had a nor’easter roll through with rain and wind and snow.  I figured I could hit this park with Ollie on our way back from the dump.  I don’t mind running in a storm. Especially in the woods.  As long as you’re dressed for it it’s actually kind of fun. 

So we stopped at this new trail section on the way back.  I figured we’d have it to ourselves because I’m usually the only one out in the woods running in a howling snow storm. 

The park looked reasonably big on the web site so I figured we’d run a few laps and check that off for the day.  Turns out it was much smaller than it looked.  The whole loop only took me 6 minutes.  The Hill part of the description was accurate.  It’s basically a little hill and the trails climb and descend that steep little hill.  There are a couple picnic tables at the top. 

Here I was looking for a relaxed ramble in the park and I ended up basically doing hill repeats in 4 inches of slush.  Ollie didn’t get it at all.  He was ambushing me and picking up big sticks to run between my legs with.  We ended up doing 16 hill loops of 90 feet of elevation or so.  In the storm.  Quite a work out.

The other big news I have is that I’m making progress on my new podcast.  I’m targeting having it live in January. 

After the Apocalypse is a serial podcast that tells the story of the survivors of a 21st century plague that has catastrophically wiped out 90% of human population.  Will they be able to survive?  What happens to our modern world when the great plague comes?  Can humankind survive and learn, or will it devolve into a dark age nightmare of our worst traits?  Listen to the story of After the Apocalypse and find out. 

Ollie and I went out this morning for another run in the woods.  We didn’t get that much snow.  Mostly rain.  Under the trees it was maybe a couple inches.  Crunchy and crusty – not bad running.  Ollie hated it.  I think it hurt his feet.  We did 2 hours or so and then moved snow and ice for another hour and a half. 

Explored a new trails system called Newtown Hill.  It was nice and nobody out there. Lots of trees and branches down from the heavy, wet snow. 

I’m tired. 

Such is life – Crusty snow, climbing hills and talking about the apocalypse.

What more could you ask for?

I’ll see you out there.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4444.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 5:32pm EDT

One of my apocalypse stories. 

Direct download: billthedog.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:55pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-443 – Chasing Summits with Gary Harrington

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4443.mp3]
Link epi4443.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-443 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

I’m going to apologize in advance. I’ve been having a hard time staying positive these last couple weeks.  I think some of it is seasonal – maybe you have these blue periods as well.  And, of course some of it is the ongoing apocalypse and the level of uncertainty and weirdness in our worlds. 

So – if any of that bleeds through, I apologize in advance.

But, here’s the good news, being who we are, life-long endurance athletes of one form or another we are going to take this as an opportunity.  We are going to flip this on its head.  We, you and I, are going to ask better questions. 

I don’t have all the answers, but we can as the questions and have the conversations with you and potentially together we can find some strategies to do better. 

And at the end of the day, I guess that’s all we can really ask, right?  To do a little bit better. 

So in today’s show we are going to talk to a fellow runner, ultra-runner and a peak bagger extraordinaire Gary Harrington about his book “chasing summits”, which on the surface is about climbing a bunch of mountains, but under the covers is about how Gary went from a divorced, struggling, overweight sports journalist to a guy who created a lifestyle of physical freedom, physical and mental health. 

As is so many times the case in our journey here at RunRunLive, what we find is that the Running, the swimming, the hiking – they weren’t the point, they were they vehicle for the self discovery.

In section one we’ll talk about how to address your sagging enthusiasm for running in the apocalypse.  In section two we’ll talk about strategies for creating freedom in your life.

The last couple weeks have been up and down for me.  I’ve maintained my off-peak training schedule of getting out 3-4 times a week for a run with 2-3 core workouts.  I haven’t been really good at keeping up my yoga.  I’ve really lacked enthusiasm for the workouts. 

Nevertheless, I have gotten some fairly pleasant long runs in the woods with Ollie.  There are a couple of compounding factors here.  First is that my 9-5 job has been mentally stressful and typically is more like 8:00 to 6:00.  By the time I role out of a day I’m exhausted and not feeling the workout. 

And my workout are consistently pushed to the after work hours.  I could get out early but the sun doesn’t rise until after 6:00 so I’m in danger of missing those early calls. 

I know, I know, I am the last person who should be in this position.  I literally wrote the book on how to train with a busy life.  But, there it is.  This is different.  Somehow the current house-arrest version of work combined with nothing to train for, makes working out feel kinda onerous and pointless.

Humans, right?  Just when we need it most, our brain manufactures ways to make it hard. 

The time change and lack of sunlight has been harder this year than previously.  I find that my eyes are really affected by staring at the computer all day and when I’m out in the woods I can’t see enough to manage the technical bits in the dark. 

This leads to having to run constantly on guard, which is stressful, constantly tweaking my feet and ankles on roots and rocks and consistently falling down.  None of this creates the mental relaxation that I go to running and trail running for. 

I can go on the roads, but then I’m dealing with traffic and the dog and it’s not the best.

So, when I got back from running last night I ordered one of those chest-based lighting systems.  I’m hoping if I can light up the trails better it will take some of the stress out of it and open those low-light options up.  My current headlamp and hand held just aren’t cutting the mustard. 

Ollie doesn’t seem to care about any of that.  He’s happy to go on the leash or on the trails.  He’s a year-and-a-half old now and there’s nothing I can do that is going to be beyond his ability.  He’s a horse of a dog and I really have to be careful and present with him on the leash.  If he decides to go ‘Call of the Wild’ on me I have trouble holding him. 

But, I love him dearly.  Even when he ambushes me on the trails and takes a nip at me. 

Last week we had a coyote come in close to the yard and just sit and watch.  Ollie was freaking out. 

Hopefully it’s not a sick animal, they can be unpredictable.  I think Ollie could hold his own in a fight.  As a sheep dog it’s basically what he’s designed for.  But, I’d rather not find out. 

See?  I told you I was in a dark mood.  Let’s turn up the lights a bit, shall we.

Let’s talk about yellow sticky pads.  You know those little pads you can jot notes on and stick on the wall? 

I had a couple days this week where I was walking into full days of calls.  Some with angry customers.  My first thought was “I so don’t want to do this today.” But I realized that I was going to do it no matter what so I might as well set the tone.  And if I was struggling to stay motivated then they were too. 

So I decided to do one thing that was under my control and not worry about all the rest.  I decided to lead with joy.  To show up in each of those calls and demonstrate joy. Smile.  Ask them to smile with me and go about our business after we set that tone. 

Because even if you are totally out of control, you can control how you show up. 

It’s a choice.

I wrote “J O Y !” in big, block letters on a stciky and stuck it to the corner of my monitor to remind me. 

I ask you my friends; what would it take for you to show up with joy today, or tomorrow?

On with the show!

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – 11 ways to rekindle your love for your sport in the apocalypse- http://runrunlive.com/11-ways-to-rekindle-your-love-for-your-sport-in-the-apocalypse

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Gary Harrington – Chasing Summits

https://amcstore.outdoors.org/products/chasing-summits

Garry Harrington hardly recognizes himself in photos any more. Staring down his fortieth birthday, he no longer looks like the collegiate athlete who once loved hiking and running. His dream job as a sports writer no longer holds the same thrill. As his marriage crumbles, he comes to the uncomfortable realization that something has to change before he loses himself entirely…

On the trails of New Hampshire’s Mount Monadnock, he begins to feel it. Every heart-pounding slog up gets easier; every break on the summit feels freer, until he racks up 1,000 ascents. As he tackles harder trails in more distant locales, he sheds the life he thought he wanted in pursuit of something more. His journey takes him from the familiar peaks of his native New England to the foreign and famous—from the Rockies, to the high peaks of Mexico to Tajumulco Volcano, the highest point in Central America, continuing ever-onwards and upwards to the summit he’d dreamt of climbing since childhood—the Matterhorn. Harrington is in rarified company, completing not only the High Points in the continental U.S. but also one of a handful to have summited all 66 of the accepted 14,000-footers in the Lower 48

Harrington’s journey of self-discovery parallels the peaks and valleys of life and loss as he seeks perspective and purpose on the high points of the Americas and Europe. His path defies all convention and expectations—including his own—rarely leaving unanswered the echoing question: “What if?”

 

Section two – Van Life- http://runrunlive.com/van-life

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have vagabonded around the world chasing mountain tops to the end of Episode 4-443 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  

So another name for the binge listening people is Michael.  I have known him for 5 years but apparently he went back and listened through the original 4 years for the start.  That’s not easy. 

I am getting to the end of another podcast that I binged through while painting the house.  I’ll take any suggestions for something new and interesting in the history space.

In related entertainment news I started watching the Walking Dead again and frankly the last couple seasons are non-interesting.  They always created tension by being willing to kill off main characters, even main characters you really liked.  The challenge there is that you are left with a bunch of secondary characters that just aren’t as interesting. 

In the 2 days between writing the intro to this show and writing the outro my chest lighting system showed up. Along with a pair of winter gloves I ordered.

I have not tried it yet but the lighting system has a white LCD light in the center of your chest with a red warning light on your back.  It is USB chargeable – so no more battery issues.  The waist band goes around your torso like a belt with the two lights, front and back.  There is a single shoulder strap that goes over one shoulder.  It’s a WestLight RunLight 5508 and I’ll et you know if it helps with my old eye in the woods.  It was $20 on Amazon.

The gloves are a thicker winter glove.  My hands get really cold in the winter.  I misplaced the thicker running gloves I had so I ordered some new ones.  They are “Prodigen Outdoor Winter Gloves Touchscreen Running Warm Gloves” which is a keyword rich description.  It’s hard to shop for gloves on-line because you really can’t know how warm they are until you have them.  But these are cycling gloves so at least they’ll block the wind.  I’ll let you know but the feel good. 

I should mention that it seems the number one requirement for gloves is being able to poke at your phone.  I have to confess that I seldom have a desire to poke at my phone in situations where I’m wearing those thicker gloves.  I guess it’s a nice to have. 

And finally I bought some socks.  I am pretty hard on running socks.  I like the thin versions.  Typically my big toe pushes a hole in all but the most aggressive running socks.  I hold out as long as I can.  I put the side with the hole on the other foot or attempt a sew job.  But I was running out.  Again buying socks on the internet is hard because you can’t touch them. 

So I just opted for a multi-pack of Saucony running socks called “Saucony Men's Multi-Pack Bolt Performance Comfort Fit No-Show Socks” – Again surprisingly keyword rich, but also there doesn’t seem to be a big need to poke at your phone with your toes – but that would not surprise me as the next generation. 

I don’t know what the material is but they slip down inside my shoes when I’m running and I have to either deal with it or stop to pull them up.  They seem functional.  I’ll give it 6 months before I tear toe-holes in them.  But they are super comfy to wear around the office in the apocalypse.  Because no one wears shoes anymore in the apocalypse.

Ollie Wollie is doing well.  He and I get out a couple times a week.  He’s still very energetic.  But, with both my wife and I home a lot he’s also learning to be more cuddly.  It’s hard for him, he’s not a hugger. 

I was just out checking the mail and my neighbor stopped me to complain about barking.  Ollie does bark at the people in the woods a lot.  He’s just doing his job.  The neighbor said it was bothersome at 10 o’clock at night.  Which is impossible because neither Ollie nor I can stay awake past 9. 

Taking a rest day today.  Well, working in the yard. Raking, cutting some wood.  But my knees were rather crunchy after my hill workout yesterday on the road.  I realized that my shoes were getting old.  I went and looked and as near as I can tell I bought those shoes in October of 2019.  So, I ordered some new Hoka Clifton’s. 

I need to find something to train for.  I’d prefer it be something challenging so I could get some of the old fire burning.  Of course all the Thanksgiving races are canceled.  Victims of the apocalypse.  I’m not going to do the Groton Marathon this year.  It’s just another thing to worry about at the end of the year.  I don’t need any more things to worry about.

This would be the perfect time to change routines and take up swimming or lifting but all the gyms are closed too.  I’m going to have to think about it.  I need something to motivate me. 

I’m still plugging away at the apocalypse stories and I will drop them onto the RunRunLive feed randomly as I get them written. 

I guess life right now for all of us is like that scene in the scary movie, maybe the zombie movie, where the protagonists have survived the initial disaster in one piece and are experiencing a relatively calm spot.  But, as we watch them recuperating and rebuilding their energy we know there are more bad guys hiding just around the corner. 

And as the scary, ominous music builds, bah, dum, Bah, Dum!

I’ll see you out there.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4443.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 5:35pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-442 – 24-Hour Run with Bill Shultz

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4442.mp3]
Link epi4442.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-442 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

How’s everyone doing?  Stressed out by the year that was 2020?  Today we have a good show for you.  We are going to talk with veteran runner Bill Sullivan about 24-hour races and other things ultra. 

Our friend Greg recommended I talk to Bill.  He said ‘Bill has some worderful stories’ and that’s one of the joys of running with a group that I miss.  Running as a social lubricant Where you get into some great story telling. 

Besides the fact that it’s my birthday.  Happy Birthday to me.  No, I haven’t gained a new age group yet but I’m getting close and I think this one will net me 15 minutes. 

The challenge that I run into, (pun intended), is, besides the apocalypse, my many of my workouts don’t lend themselves to social runs.  It’s not like I’m meeting you in the park for an easy 5K.  I also tend to be rushed for time on most days.

I do have Ollie with me on most runs and he keeps me busy by ambushing me, playfully, (I think) nipping at me and running between my legs growling with giant pointy sticks. 

Speaking of Ollie, I got one of those step-in harnesses for him that works very well.

First, because he hates anything that you have to put over his head.  He will see that coming and unless you’re willing to lose some skin you’re not getting that on him.  This one, you lay it on the floor flat, he steps into with the appropriate treat bribery, and you pull it up and snap it. 

Second, he can’t slip out of it.  The collar he can get out of.  The harness is safer.  The rings to attach the leash are on his back, about his shoulders. 

Finally, he doesn’t seem to want to pull as hard from that configuration as he does on the leash.  He still leans into it a little but it’s much better.  It’s a little loose.  He’s in between big dog and medium dog, but it’s workable. 

In Section One today I’m going talk to you folks who might be ultra-curious.  In section two I’ll give you another apocalypse story.  I’m writing them anyhow so I might as well use them here. 

But, today is a momentous day. 

This week we have seen the culmination of something that has been years in the making.  A triumph of the soul as well as the physical world. 

It is a new dawn.  No longer do I have to be governed by the never-ending worry and stress.  We have burst free of the impure and corrupt.  We are staring ahead at a bright future without the evil constraints of the past.  We have remedied the dirty, corrupt and contaminated state of our lives. 

Yes, today, I declare, before all, that this week…

I finally finished painting my house. 

Yeah.

What did you think I was talking about?  Took me all summer.  I did it all with a paint brush. 

Looks nice. 

Anyhow, back to the old man in the apocalypse.  The only reason this is even tangentially relevant to you in a podcast about running is that my main character is the Old Man, who is an ultra-runner.  In today’s chapter I try to build the backstory with a little exposition.  He is a man who enters the apocalypse having lost faith in humanity and his arc will be how he recovers that faith.

I signed up for Nanowrimo.  Which is a daily writing challenge in November.  People try to write a few thousand words a day and finish the month with the first draft of a novel.  I’m not looking to write a novel.  I think my plan is to write a podcast. 

I don’t really have the time to sit and write for 6 hours a day, but I can give it a few minutes every morning and see what I come up with.  Stitch together the stories and characters that I have been playing with. 

My current plan is to get enough of the story put together into a narrative that I can build a new podcast feed around it.  The first pass will be just me, reading into audio.  If it get’s any kind of traction and if I can build a community around it I can then organize it into a ‘radio play’ in the second version.

We’ll see how it goes.  For me it’s a big goal and a big risk.

But, I think that’s one of the keys of life.  We talk about ultra-running today.  How many people do you think sign up for their first ultra event thinking they have no chance of failure?  Of course not.  Every one of them doubts whether they can do it. 

That’s the beauty of taking big risks.  If you have a good chance to fail you’re guaranteed to learn something along the way.  You’re guaranteed to find your edge.  Even if you fall a little short you’ll move your set point and be ready for even bigger things next time.

And that’s how I’m treating this effort in November.  A bit of ‘why not?’  and a bit of ‘who cares?’

And that my friends is a lesson, right?  Don’t aim so low that you are confident you can’t lose.  Because if you do that you’ll never win either.

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – For the Ultra-Curious- http://runrunlive.com/for-the-ultra-curious

Voices of reason – the conversation

Bill Shultz – Dawn to Dusk to Dawn

https://www.delcorrc.com/about-2/

The Delco Road Runners Club, in Delaware County, PA, is a large, inclusive group of runners, walkers, triathletes, and others fond of fitness. We have more than 200 members of all ages and abilities, and we host fun runs/walks on six days of the week. The club organizes the popular Tyler Arboretum 10K Trail Run, the Dawn to Dusk to Dawn Ultramarathon and the Delaware County High Schools X-C Championship, as well as the Junior Development Track Meet for athletes age 18 and under. Our website, emails, and Facebook page help keep our members up to date on upcoming events and races around the Philadelphia area.

Dawn To Dusk To Dawn Ultras

https://www.facebook.com/groups/371154303029686/

If you're looking for an ultra track event, this May be the group for you! D3 is a proud Sponsor of the U.S. National 24 Hour Running Team.

 

Section two – The Ford of Death- http://runrunlive.com/the-ford-of-death

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have run a 24 hours straight, maybe to set even a world record,  to the end of Episode 4-442 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  

I would like to introduce you to Tony.  Tony is THAT guy. The one who binge listened through all 400+ RunRunLive podcasts.  I find this fascinating and I have to get him on the zoom phone to chat about it. 

I do the same thing with some of the history podcasts that I listen through.  It’s a weird bit of time traveling because the author lives 10 to 12 years f their life, while you may only listen through it in a couple months. 

For you, when listening, you may listen to 4-5 episodes in a row while painting on a Sunday and you get the compressed narrative of the author’s life.  Then you hit the end of the line and eventually run out of fresh content. 

There’s this moment of exhilaration and sadness when you realize that the narrative has now slowed to normal time.  Some of these histories I listen to only put out a podcast every month!  And in that time you tease out a bit of the author’s real character behind the character of the avatar they project into the podcast. 

I’m training away at my off-season pace.  3-4 easy runs a week with some core work on the off days.  I’ve been super busy with work.  Had to stop riding my bike because we got a cold snap where the temps crashed down to below 20 degrees F and we got a few inches of snow last weekend.  Now, this weekend, it’s 70 again. 

I can finish up the yard work and chores I was trying to get done. 

We moved the time back last weekend as well.  This means it’s brighter in the morning, which is great for taking Ollie out for his walk.  But, it’s conversely dark at 4:30 and will basically stay there until the winter solstice in December. 

I went out into the trails a couple times this week in the dark with Ollie and it’s tough running.  My eyes aren’t as good as they used to be and with the trails covered in leaves it’s really hard to navigate the technical bits.  Not super relaxing when you’re constantly fighting the trail. 

But, it’s ok.  Looking around and back over the last decade of running, like Tony got to do, I’ve got a lot to be grateful for.  I’m still out there and I’m still functional even if it doesn’t’ come as fast or as easy as it once did. 

A quick programming note: I got a taker for the FreeTrain phone vest, but still have that super small Aonijie vest that would make an excellent gift for the school girl runner in your life if you have one.  Free for the ask.  And the entire Jack Campbell ‘Lost Fleet’ series if you’ve got a SF fan in your house. 

This week I’ll also include the 20th and final song off of Brian Scheff the rock opera by The Nays.  It’s my friend Frank’s band. Love it or hate it, it’s my podcast and I can do what I want!  Any other starving artists out there that want to contribute some music to play out the end of future shows feel free to reach out – I’m, as always cyktrussell@gmail.com

I have quick tip for you folks who may be stressed out in your work, having to take all these remote video calls.  And I have tested this.  You can have a browser window open and play meditation music in the background of your calls and no one can hear it but you. 

Seriously, while you’re getting yelled at by your boss r some unhappy customer you can have calming music in the background.  It really change the tenor of some calls.  Just search YouTube for “Happy Morning Meditation Music”.

And I know it can be a stressful time.  Things get tough at work, or in life, and as you have challenges it’s easy to slip into scarcity and negativity.  One prominent symptom of this is when you start to complain.  You start to tell people why everything is awful and all the things that are being done poorly by all the stupid and lazy and incompetent people. 

If you see the people you interact with or even yourself start to complain it’s time to act.  Because, complaining is non-intentional.  It is being the victim.  It is basically saying you have no control. 

And you always have control.

You have control of what you say and how you say it.  You have control of the questions you ask. 

So, my assignment for you this week is to watch out for the complaining.  Be alert to where you start to complain or your group starts to complain.  This will be your trigger.  This will be the alert in your mental inbox. 

When you hear the complaint you’re going to take control.  You are going to be intentional.  You are going to flip the narrative.  You are going to ask better questions.  “What can I do to make this better?”

And you are going to vocalize those thoughts within those bitch sessions.  You are going to say to the complaint committee, either the real-life one or the one in your head.  “We need to focus on what is going well and what our long term goals are.  We need to intentionally stay positive and work to learn from these challenges and get better over the long run.”

Because this is an opportunity for leadership. 

We need to keep our eyes on the prize. 

And in doing so set an example for others.

And I’ll see you out there.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4442.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:13pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-440 – Run Grateful with Mark White

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4441.mp3]
Link epi4441.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-441 of the RunRunLive podcast.  This week we talk about ‘Grateful Running’ with Mark White from the UK who is leading a movement to combine gratitude and running.

Gratitude is a powerful thing.  If you are feeling low or anxious, gratitude can alleviate those negative emotions and feelings.  It’s really hard to feel bad when you are grateful.

It’s powerful and centering.  You can always be grateful for what you have.  You can always adjust your focus to what you have versus what you don’t have.  By definition gratitude engenderers an attitude of abundance over an attitude of scarcity. 

It’s been fairly quiet on the athletics side as we continue to ride out the apocalypse here.  I’ve been sticking with my down schedule of 3 runs a week, 3 core workouts and a bike ride.  At this point as we get towards November we’re losing the sun and that makes things a bit more challenging. 

We’ll turn the clocks back in a week.  Right now the sun doesn’t come up until after 7:00 in the morning and sets before 6:00.  Next week we’ll get the morning sun back but will totally lose the afternoon.  There it will dither about until the winter solstice in December to begin the slow climb back into the light in the spring. 

I’ve always been night runner.  It has its advantages and drawbacks.  The leaves are mostly down now as we have gotten a hard frost and a number of heavy rainstorms with wind.  I’m finding my eyes aren’t as good as they used to be either. 

It can be challenging running in the woods at night.  I have to slow down and pick my way along to keep from falling or turning an ankle.  The apocalypse hordes have added noticeable wear to the trails.  The increased volume of foot traffic this summer has brought out the roots and rocks. 

There are positives about running at night.  I don’t have to worry about any time constraints.  No sense in hurrying.  I don’t have to worry about sharing the trails with people. Which means I can have Ollie off leash without problematic interactions. 

I suppose there’s a greater chance of running into some wild animals in the dark.  I’m not generally worried about that.  We don’t have anything too dangerous in our woods.  The coyotes have been very active recently and that worries me a bit.  I’m not sure how Ollie would react.

A couple nights recently the coyotes have been very vocal and quite close to the house.  They have their ceremonies.  I think it’s when they kill something.  They all yip and howl for 10 – 20 minutes.  It’s quite eerie.  Unnerving.  To be woken up in the dead of the night by their canid keening.

Last year was a mast year.  Meaning there are certain years when the oak trees produce more acorns.  The trees do this as a defense mechanism to outwit their predators.  They basically produce more nuts than the squirrels and chipmunks and deer can stash away. 

The carryon effect is that this creates a population boom in the squirrel and chipmunk and deer.  I’m guessing this year that meant a baby boom for the coyotes.  That and the uncommonly warmer weather. 

Why I care is that all this potentially means a bunch of hungry coyotes wandering around in the woods.  And with coyotes, like humans, you don’t really need to be afraid of them unless they’re hungry and desperate. 

Or if they get their hands on some ACME products.

on with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Google - http://runrunlive.com/6-most-googled-questions-about-running

Voices of reason – the conversation

Mark White – Run Grateful

At Run Grateful, we organize two types of gratitude-based running events:

The 26.2 Mile/24 hour Run Grateful challenge,

which involves starting with a 5km distance run, followed by running a mile on the hour, for twenty-four straight hours (amounting to  a full 26.2 mile marathon distance) — dedicating each hour to someone or something you feel gratitude towards. Please watch a powerfully  emotive 1-minute highlight of the event here.

To compliment the 24 Hour Run Grateful Challenge, the One Grateful Mile was launched across the world, connecting hundreds of runners from 20 different countries - from Nigeria to Oman to Australia, through  the power of gratitude. The appeal of the One Grateful Mile is in its simplicity of practice that can be incorporated into any training run: simply think of something or someone to dedicate at least one (or more) training miles to.

The idea is simple, yet the One Grateful Mile transforms any regular training mile into one that can completely shift one’s life perspective into one of positivity, personal growth,  and an enhanced connection to others.

We believe that the spark that can ignite a trend towards global gratitude is the enthusiasm of all runners, of all backgrounds, who discover that grateful living makes life meaningful, fulfilling, and richer. We consider gratitude as a universal currency that can be practiced  by the world at large; thus, our hope is to see the One Grateful Mile or the 24 hour Run Grateful Challenge expand into every country,

 connecting the world through the transformative power of gratitude. Our ultimate goal is to have each and every runner in the world  run a grateful mile.

 

Section two – Returning to Getting Things Done - http://runrunlive.com/getting-things-done

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have run a mile every hour with gratitude to the end of Episode 4-441 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  

I I didn’t hear from anyone in response to my question last week, as to whether or nor they have binge listened to all the RunRunLive Podcasts from the beginning and are just now arriving at the end.  Of course, unless I get eaten by a coyote, or a giant tree sloth, this won’t be the end by next episode. 

Time flows on by.  It’s fall the leaves are down.  The harvest is in.  The frost is one the pumpkin.  The sun has moved it’s seasonal home to more southern climes.  And here we are, you and I, staring down another long New England winter.

Today I have a bunch of product reviews, shopping suggestions for you.  It’s the traditional gift-giving season. 

First, in general.  Think about pulling back a bit from the big guys.  Those monopolistic on-line retailers.  Think about helping someone smaller or someone local. 

One of the ways to do this is patronize the starving artist websites for your holidays.  Like Etzy or some of those other aggregators.  They have some unique stuff that folks make in their garages with 3D printers.  Made with love by anarchists and crafters. 

And think about your independent or university bookstores.  I ordered some tote bags from the Harvard book store.  These aren’t easy times for them.  More homeless than scholars wandering Harvard Square these days. 

I have a couple products that I’ve found that I really like.  First is a company called 32 degrees.  They make clothes, but specifically technical underwear.  Not specifically for athletes, but I’ve found it to be affordable, super comfy AND I can run in them.  I got some of their t-shirts to wear under my dress shirts and those are comfy as well. I don’t have any sponsor relationship with them, just like the product. 

Of course I’m talking about men’s underwear.  I don’t know anything about women’s underwear.  I think I may be violating local laws just uttering the phrase ‘women’s underwear.  But they have that too. 

Another Product I’m surprisingly happy with is a Bluetooth headset from Letscom.  I got them off of Amazon for $20.  They are cheap but are holding up well and the controls are easy to work with, and the battery life is great.  I’ve been using them to listen to podcasts while I’m painting. 

I also have ordered a bunch of stuff from Nuts.com.  Surprisingly they sell nuts.  But, they also sell loose tea.  Now that I’m stuck at home I’m going through a lot of tea.  I like to make my own dosage with the reusable silicon tea bags.  

The trick with nuts and dates and nay dried fruit is you want to read the label carefully.  You want to make sure they don’t have added sugar or sulfur.  I make my own trail mix by buying the dried fruit and nuts in bulk and mixing it together.  The problem with commercial trail mix is that it always has the sugared fruit in it. 

Last but not least I have been experimenting with running vests.  I bought one from Aonijie and the first one they sent took 4 months to get to me and was tiny when I got it.  This was an order from an outfit called Wish.com.  Terrible service.  If anyone needs a small running vest shot me a note and I’ll send it to you. 

Then I got the right size from another outfit, I think I actually ordered it from an Instagram add, and it is good.  It hangs high and light on your shoulders for those times when you just want to carry your phone and the dog’s leash.  I have the 2 liter bladder and the bottles for it as well but I haven’t tried those yet.  I think it’s a good alternative to the old style hydration backpack that I’ve been using for a decade. 

Finally, a startup company called FreeTrain sent me a vest to try.  This vest is specifically to carry your phone in such a way that you can get to it without taking it out while you’re doing you sport.  It’s a lot like a sports bra in construction, I would imagine, because I have never actually worn a sports bra. 

You put the phone in a pocket on the front of your chest, like where IronMan’s reactor is.  The pocket flips down with a snap so that you can poke at your phone without taking it out.  That’s what it does.  It’s a single purpose piece of equipment.  I will confess right now to not being their target demographic. 

I’m probably not going to use it much, so if one of you thinks this is a problem you need solved I will regift it to you. 

Speaking of re-gifting, I have read through the Jack Campbell ‘Lost Fleet’ series in honest to goodness mass market paperback.  If anyone likes hard SF with not much hard thinking required, I’ll send you that as well.  It’s like Horatio Hornblower in space. 

That’s enough shop talk for today.  If anyone ever has something they’d like me to write about please send me a note at cyktrussell at gmail dot com – I’m always looking for content and topics. 

As our friend Mark White would remind you, it’s always a good time to focus on gratitude.  These days we are all stressed out about what we can’t do or don’t have.  You don’t have to be that way.  You can flip that around. 

I’m sure we’ve got things we can be grateful for, like trails and dogs and fresh water and sweet fall air crisp to the taste. 

Take a second, wherever you are and think of three things that you are thankful and grateful for.  Right now.  Then carry that with you into the swirl of your week to counter balance the buffeting drifts of scarcity.

Happy Halloween. 

I’ll see you out there.

Only two songs left - Track number 19 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Brian Sheff”  Rock on my pretties.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4441.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:45pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-440 – Jason has an Epiphany

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4440.mp3]
Link epi4440.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-440 of the RunRunLive podcast.  Yes, welcome my friends.  I know I’m a week late.  It pains me to not meet my commitments.  It’s a sign of a life lived out of control.  I’m not a control freak but I do like to engender habits.  And habits are very strong things.  Habits are the fibrous tissue of day to day life.  They are hard to tear, but once rent they are hard to put back in place. 

So, apologies.  For being a week late.  My work got very time intensive and emotionally taxing for a couple weeks.  That combined with the necessary house work and everything else pushed me past, irrevocably past, the deadline.  I have taken some corrective action on this front and will talk about that more later.

Today we talk with Jason.  Jason had one of those death experiences.  Not ‘near death’, no, for Jason he died, and then came back.  It’s always interesting for me to talk to people who have had these life altering events. It underscores the ability and power we all have inside of us to change, to radically change, to begin to live life before it is too late, but for some reason we don’t. 

Why is that?  What is the glue of normalcy that causes us to submit our dreams of adventure to a the daily grind? 

Until, one day, we shuffle off the mortal coil leaving dreams unfulfilled scattered here and there like unopened Christmas presents.

In section one I’ll talk about how you can build your own ad hoc core workout routines.  In section two we’ll catch up with the old man and Bill the dog in the apocalypse. 

I listen to mostly history podcasts these days.  I’ll start a history podcast and listen through until I’m caught up.  It’s usually a couple hundred episodes.  I like the continuity of it. Of being able to listen through an arc of the historical narrative.  Maybe while painting or gardening for a few hours at a time.

It’s always a mixture of the bittersweet and the accomplishment when I get caught up. 

Then it gets me to thinking that there might be someone out there listening to this who has just listened through the athletic arc of a dozen years of my life.  That’s odd.  If it’s you, send me an email or reach out to me on social I’d love to talk to you.  Cyktrussell at gmail dot com. 

I don’t spend much time on social media anymore.  I’ve entirely given up on Twitter.  I dip into Facebook to see if anyone is looking for me maybe once a day.  I do post pictures on Instagram. That doesn’t seem to be much of a sewer yet, but it’s only a matter of time.  

Since we last talked, which was after my virtual Boston marathon, I’ve been taking it pretty easy.  The leg seems to have gotten better.  No more swelling or lumps or lymph node swelling.  Kind of makes me feel like a fake.  I skipped my race and it turned out to be nothing.  But, that is life.

I’ve been running with Ollie 3 days a week for 20ish miles, Maybe mid 20’s.  Just easy stuff.  Mostly trails.  I’m easing into core work and yoga on the other days.  On Sundays I meet my buddies and we do a long, easy bike ride.  Usually around 30 miles.  We hit someplace to eat halfway.  It’s a nice change. 

I’ve got my old race bike, Fuji-san, the classic steel frame road bike that I bought to commute with 20 years ago.  It’s a real bike.  A bit heavy, but good Shimano components, clip on aero bars and enough working gears to get me where I’m going.  Usually if I’m training I might average 18 miles an hour.  On these pancake and bagel rides we tend to average 11-12 miles per hour, so that should give you a sense of the effort level!

I’m going to stick with this routine until the end of the year.  There are no events, so there’s no reason to get specific with any training.  Just keep my engine turning over and stay healthy. 

How about a garden update?  Well, not much left at this point.  I picked all the rest of the peppers today.  We haven’t had a frost yet so things are alive.  I’ve got some beans and the rasberries are still producing. 

And of course the kale likes the colder weather.  But I’ve got a persistent worm problem. 

Since I was working from home all summer I decided to see if I could win the worm war.  I would go out everyday and inspect the kale leaves for worms.  I’d pluck them off and squish them.  I found that after a week or so I was winning. 

But, it was not a victory I could ever walk away from.  Miss a couple days and the worms would be back.  Miss a week and you might as well give up.  I learned.  I learned that if I actually wanted worm free kale I would have to inspect every leave on every plant every day.  What if I had a kale farm with hundreds of plants?  What if I needed these kale leaves to feed the tribe? 

The obvious conclusion is that kale farming must have led to the necessity for slavery.  There’s no other way you could keep up. 

And with that, let’s get on with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Creating a home workout routine - http://runrunlive.com/how-to-create-a-total-body-workout-routine

Voices of reason – the conversation

Jason Pepin

Mix one-part endurance athlete and one-part chef with a pinch of moderation, and you’ve got Jason Pepin.

However, moderation wasn’t always part of the equation. Looking back, Jason knows he’s one of the lucky ones. After all, there aren’t many people walking around who can say they got to hit the reset button on their physical health.

In 2012, Jason suffered a massive heart attack while on his bike ride in Los Angeles. With a survival rate of just 12%, and known as “the widowmaker”, his heart attack was the result of critical blockage in a main artery. That day, Jason died and was revived on the table. And while most people won’t ever walk out of the hospital again, in just two short months he was back on his bike.

But being a determined athlete is just one half of who Jason is. The other half is a tireless chef who, at age 12, was first inspired by his grandmother to start cooking. She instilled in him the value of sourcing the freshest ingredients and a respect for simplicity in preparation, both of which have remained the hallmarks of his cuisine.

After 30 years in the kitchens of famous culinary brands such as Morton’s The Steakhouse and Wolfgang Puck, Chef Jason has learned there is more to a healthy life than just exercise. Building on what his grandmother taught him, Jason has added the value of moderation to create a healthful lifestyle that is both sustainable and balanced.

mountain climbing, practicing martial arts, cooking, and being the favorite human to a freakishly large cat named Loki.

Section two – City of the Dead part 3 - http://runrunlive.com/city-of-the-dead-part-3

Outro

Ok my friends we have ridden our old bikes to the bagel shop at the end of Episode 4-440 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  I’ll take a sunflower seed, toasted with crunchy peanut butter and strawberry jam please.

So you already know my training plans for the foreseeable future.  Easy on the running with a recreational bike and some core workouts.  That’s pretty boring.  Got to find myself some inspiration. 

Other good news is that I’m almost done painting the house.  I’ve got a couple places I can’t reach.  My 32 foot ladder that I used to reach those places last time I painted the house is out of action.  The rung locks are non-functional.  I tried to order new rung locks, but the ladder is too old to get replacement parts for.  The only way I could use it would be to extend it all the way, manually lock the rungs in place then try to get it up, which, believe me I tried but the physics of it is impossible. 

But, my other running buddy Brian is a contractor, and he’s gong to let me borrow his long ladder this week to finish up.  Next up on the never-ending home improvement list is garage doors.  Which I was delighted to discover is only like $3,000. 

I have to winterize my motorcycle.  I didn’t ride it at all this summer due to the apocalypse.  I’ll take it back over and stick it in Frank’s barn for the winter.  That’s on my list as well; to find an outfit to refurbish my old motorcycle.  It would cost more than the bike is worth, but it would make me happy. 

Ollie the collie is almost a year and a half old!  He’s still mostly feral but hey, aren’t we all?  He’s great with people on the trails.  I just say, “Leave it!” and he ignores them.  When he greets another dog he rolls over onto his back and get’s all submissive. 

He’s a nightmare on the leash.  I took him out on the road one night this week.  I have to really pay attention.  He’ll get spooked by something and take off at an angle. I have to get a better harness for him.  The collar isn’t’ good enough.  He’s built like a brick house.  Not as rangy as Buddy was.  More of a linebacker or a fullback.  Amazingly strong and athletic.  Smart as heck, but willful and I’m thinking part jackal. 

Among the books I’m reading is one by Brene’ Brown called Daring Greatly.  The premise is that you have to get outside your comfort zone to find the good stuff.  You have to be vulnerable.  But, in order to be vulnerable you need to have a strong sense of self-worth. 

That’s what gives you the strength. 

You have to be convinced of your own self-worth. Your unique gifts.  Your power.  In itself.  Incomparable to anyone else.  Incomparable to previous versions of yourself.  You centered power of what you bring, unafraid, right now. 

And that self-power allows you to dance badly in public and sing karaoke.  When you have that keen sense of self in the now you can do hard things, you can be vulnerable, and that allows you to listen with empathy, to learn new things and, heaven forbid, change your mind. 

So, my friends, what would you do if you weren’t afraid of failure? 

Think about it.  Every day is another chance to find out.

And…

I’ll see you out there.

To take you out is Track number 18 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "when the Sun Burns out”  AndI know you’ll be sad to hear that there are only 2 tracks left in the rock opera.  But, Frank told me this morning that they are working on some new songs, so there is hope for the future. 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4440.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:01pm EDT

Direct download: Pickard.output.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:02pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-439 – Dave and Duane talk Wapack

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4439.mp3]
Link epi4439.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-439 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

Today we chat with our friends Duane and David about their adventure on the Wapack Trail.  After I had to bail out they decide to go and run it anyhow.  They had an adventure and learned some lessons so we decided to do a lessons learned conversation. 

I ended up ignoring doctor’s orders and running the 124th virtual 2020 Boston Marathon and you lucky folks will get one of my wonderfully thoughtful and entertaining race reports.  I know you’ve missed them so, with the apocalypse and all. 

But, it came out quite long, as race reports do, so that’s all you get in this episode.  I know I deviously left you with a cliff-hanger in the apocalypse story narrative.  In my own devious way this allows me some more time to work on untying that knot for the next show!

That means, I’ll start with the interview and close with the race report and that will fill out our agenda. 

I’m running out of daylight and I don’t want to delay the episode so without further ado…

On with the show

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – It’s not about the shoes - http://runrunlive.com/its-not-about-the-shoes

Voices of reason – the conversation

David Foss & Duane Hespell –

David does an additional review of his adventure with Duane on his podcast here ->

Please enjoy the most recent episode of my Just Plain Dave podcast:
063. Duane and Dave’s Excellent Adventure On the Wapack Trail

 https://anchor.fm/dave191/episodes/063--Duane-and-Daves-Excellent-Adventure-ejbb2a

 

Section two – 2020 Virtual Boston Marathon

Outro

Ok my friends we have run 1K loops  through the end of Episode 4-439 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

Although I did not get any call from the doctor about the swelling in my leg in time for my marathon run, he did finally give me a call this week.  I nailed it.  He said good news is there is no mass.  There is some sort of swelling.  We don’t know what it is, maybe an infection.  Stay off it for a couple weeks and give us call back if it doesn’t’ go away.”

To which I responded, “Yeah, it felt fine when I ran a marathon in my neighborhood on Sunday.” 

Oh how we enjoy our little tête-à-tête…

He knows better than to give me the “You need 10 sessions of physical therapy” line.

Fall is closing in, daylight is fading and I’m going to take it easy for a few weeks.  I’m trying to transition to a weights routine because I feel a bit fragile and weak.  I’d love to go to a gym, with real weights, but I think that ship is still out at sea.  Guess I’ll have to figure out how to do it at home.

My work is super busy and I quite enjoyed not having to squeeze 2 hours of running into the day for the last couple weeks.  I went out and did an easy 10K with the boys over in Groton with Ollie on the leash.  I couldn’t stay put any longer.  Needed to run. 

Hope you enjoyed all the adventure here today.  I know I did. 

2020 only has 3 more months in it.  Forget abot hunkering down.  Spread your wings and fly.  Push away the sticky carapace of chaos and impose your will and your love on your world.  There are mountains to be climbed and dragons to be slain. 

And as you swing that vorpal sword…

I’ll see you out there.

To take you out is Track number 17 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Hawaiian Brian” 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4439.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:50pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-438 – Shop Talk with Brodie

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4438.mp3]
Link epi4438.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-438 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

I’ve got a lot of news today, but we will get to that in more in the outro. 

Today I recorded a shop talk chat with an Australian dude, Brodie, who I met on Facebook.  He is a physio down under and has a podcast about running without getting injured.  Which it turns out is super ironic. 

As for a theme.  I was toying with ‘collaboration’, or maybe ‘taking the long view’ or maybe even ‘how to be at peace with what the universe gives you’.  I don’t know.  We’ll just have to see how it comes out. 

My training was going well up until the middle of last week.  I finished off this cycle with a 18 mile trail run with the dog last Sunday.  I have been challenged by how busy I am at work.  Surely feeling the stress of time scarcity, whether real or imagined. 

In section one I think I’m going to talk about shoes because Brodie brought this up and I think it needs clarification.  In section 2 I’m going to give you part two of the latest apocalypse story where I try my hand at writing some exposition. 

I was also feeling a lot of stress around the current news cycles.  So I decided to shut off the incoming feeds.  We all like to think of ourselves as independent of external influences but at the end of the day we are as Pavlovian as Cocker Spaniels. 

What you let into your awareness colors your awareness.  The news and social media channels know this.  They also know how to manipulate your emotions.  If you don’t believe me try an A-B test on any of your social media.  Publish two pieces of content.  One hopeful and positive.  The other angry and negative.  See which one gets the most response. 

The algorithms automatically reinforce our natural negative biases and will drive the anger and outrage to the top of your feeds.  It’s a negative reinforcement cycle.  Unfortunately, the news isn’t much better.  If it bleeds it leads. 

I was starting my days by reading the headlines of the different news feeds I get.  I decided to stop reading the news and I also stopped posting or reading Facebook in particular.  I gave up Twitter a couple years ago.  If you need to reach me send me an email.  I’m still posting on Instagram as cyktrussell if you like pictures of food and dogs.

It’s too bad.  These are the same tools that allowed me to meet and get to know you, my friends.  Now they are driving us apart.  But at the end of the day it’s a choice, right?  You’d like to believe that you can choose how to interact and react and you can control your own emotions from external influences.

But in the spirit of balance, the universe also gave back to me when I needed it this week.  All the old running podcasters from a decade ago started interacting on a new audio app called Cappuccino.  This takes us back to that intimate little club of casual runners who used to get together on Twitter in the old days. 

It’s nice to hear from them.  It’s got a bit of an ‘old soldiers’ feel to it. 

And let’s make that the theme for today why don’t we?  Old friends.

You and I and old friends,

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – It’s not about the shoes - http://runrunlive.com/its-not-about-the-shoes

Voices of reason – the conversation

Brodie Sharpe - https://breakthroughrunning.physio/#team

https://breakthroughrunning.physio/the-run-smarter-podcast/

Why Brodie Sharpe?

 

Qualifications & Experience
  • Bachelor of Health Science & Masters of Physiotherapy Practice (2012)
  • The Running Clinic – Certified professional
  • Musculoskeletal injuries for runners online course (Simon Bartold – One of Australia’s best running podiatrists)
  • Running Repairs course (Tom Goom – One of the world’s leading running physiotherapists)
  • Athletics Victoria Run coaching qualifications
  • Sports Medicine Australia – The Secrets to injury Proofing runners

Running specialist guest speaker on:

  • Pushing the limits podcast – Lisa Tamati
  • The Athlete’s Garage – Trang Nguyen

Published articles in:

  • CEA Magazine
  • So Let’s Go Running E-magazine
  • Podcast Host – Everyday Running Legends

 

Section two – City of the dead 2 – http://runrunlive.com/city-of-the-dead-part-2

Outro

Ok my friends we have collaborates through the end of Episode 4-438 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

Let’s get on the big news. 

I finished up my 1,000 Km run across Tennessee 8/25 as predicted.  Got my belt buckle. 

Topped off my training last weekend with a nice long trail run with Ollie. 

My plan for this cycle was to run the 42-mile Wapack and back with some buddies and pick up my virtual Boston marathon in the process. 

But, life, even this wonderful endurance life does not care about your plans!  Chaos stepped in.

The day after I ran the north half of the Wapack with Paul a couple weeks ago I had a little twinge in my right quad.  I was out walking with Ollie in the morning and it felt like a little cramp.  I thought to myself, “huh, must be dehydrated or something” and forgot about it.

Then I noticed the lymph node in my right leg was a bit swollen.  No big deal, some sort of bite or scab or nick was causing an immune response.  I had an easy week and it all went away.

Then throughout that next hard week I had this ache or itch inside my right quad.  Didn’t hurt when I ran, but was a noticeable niggle. 

After my big week capped with the big trail run my right quad was noticeably swollen and the lymph node was up again.  It seemed to be spreading down the quad. Still didn’t hurt when I ran.  Not a muscle or a tendon thing. 

So, I did the smart thing and went to see my doctor.  He was concerned and ordered an MRI.  Told me to stay off it.  He intimated that is may be a hematoma.  Basically, something bleeding in there.  Which kinda makes sense given all the trail running and falling down I did in July and August. 

Since I’m a member of the Great American Health Care System, even though I’m one of the privileged with health care, I am 8 phone calls into scheduling the MRI.  Bottom line I had to cancel my plans this weekend.  It’s either nothing, or it’s something.  We won’t know until the MRI, and maybe then we won’t know either.

And so this big summer trail cycle comes to a close with a whimper instead of a bang.  With the long weekend we’ll see when I can get in to do the MRI. I’ve got a short window to get my Boston Virtual done. May have to walk it. 

After that I’m felling like I need to spend the rest of the year working on my flexibility and strength.  I’m feeling a bit week and fragile.  I’ll have to figure out how to get back on the weights.

Don’t worry about me.  It’s all part of the journey.  It’s been a weird year for everyone and I am certainly blessed. 

So, my friends, don’t get caught up in the weirdness.  Set your own path.  Take what the universe gives you and make some sweet lemonade, because I most certainly will see you out there.

To take you out is Track number 16 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Stars and Solitude” 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4438.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:51pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-437 – Rickey Gates – Across America

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4437.mp3]
Link epi4437.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-437 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

Today’s theme is journeys.  I connected with Rickey Gates and we have an interesting discussion around his journeys, particularly his 2016 run across America.  This particular journey wasn’t about getting the miles in per se, it was about discovering the heart of the country and finding himself. 

And that’s the gift that we get from our endurance sports practices.  Every time we lace up the shoes and leave the house it’s a microcosm of the great journey.  It’s a small version of that unsettled quest we homo sapiens have always had, not only to find what’s on the other side of the next hill but what’s on the other side of our known limits. 

In section one I talk about the nuances of doing tempo training in the trails and in section two I wrote another installment of the old man apocalypse story, because Tim asked me to.  This one is going to be the first part of a 3-parter. 

I’ve had a decent couple weeks of training.  We got through the hot part of the summer up here and now we are rapidly approaching autumn and fall.  After we last spoke I spent a weekend down at my house on Cape Cod.  I had a big weekend in my training. 

Friday night I had a long tempo run and by the time I got the podcast out and drove down it was late afternoon.  I did not feel like going out for a hard, hot, long workout.  I was mad because I packed up my water back pack and my bottle then forgot to put it in the truck in my haste.  It’s so hot and humid and dry on the Cape, with way less tree cover, that you really need a good hydration option.

I grabbed a bottle of water and figured I’d give it a try and see how I felt. 

I took Ollie and set off across the street to a state park that apparently no one really knows about.  It’s sectioned up by dirt roads and has a couple ponds.  I discovered it while mountain biking and was a bit astonished to realize there was a state park ½ mile from my door that I had been running by for years. 

A dirt road on the Cape is a sand road.  The whole place is one big sand dune. I’ve discovered a loop that circumnavigates one of the ponds.  It’s conveniently about a mile from the house, then a short mile of single path through the scrub oak and blueberries around the pond.  For tempo I can just run the loop and when time is up I can jog home 

And that’s what I did that Friday night. 

Even though I felt shitty and discombobulated going in I felt pretty strong once I warmed up.  Ollie and I got into a rhythm and ran the workout with a reasonable amount of aplomb. 

The next day, Saturday, I had a 3-hour bike ride on the schedule and I wasn’t quite sure how I was going to do that with my water pack.  I found a random tradeshow backpack in my truck and I loaded that up with a few bottles of water and some food. I made it all the way from Harwich up the rail trail to the end at the beach in Wellfleet  turned around and came back. 

There were a lot of people out on the trail.  I talked to some people wearing PanMass Challenge shirts and apparently that was a virtual event this year as well. 

It was Sunday that really had me worried.  It was going to be the hottest day and I had a 3-hour run on the schedule.  The only way I could figure out how to do it safely was to go early and do 3 1-hour out and backs. 

I started the first leg around 7:00 AM and headed on the roads over to the rail trail east.  Even at that time of day it was hot in the full sun on the bike trail.  There weren’t many people out yet, mostly serious bikers getting their workouts in before the crowds showed up.  By the time I got back to the house I was soaked like I had been swimming and my single bottle was well-past empty. 

But, it was a solid logistical plan.  I drank my fill, ate some fruit, changed my shirt and headed back out.  This time I took the roads east towards Pleasant Bay and Chatham.  I made it down to the ocean and looked around a bit before heading back to the house to refuel again. 

Last loop I decide to head back into the state park with Ollie.  He was mental that I was going out and coming back and not taking him.  I figured the park would be easier on me and I could get some shade.  To get there I have to cross a busy road and into an unassuming side road with no signage.  If you didn’t look at the map you’d have no idea there was a park squeezed in there. 

Ollie was so amped up he was dragging me on the leash.  As soon as the road turned to sand I let him off.  I was too tired to fight him.  Watching him take off up the dry sand road was like one of those road runner cartoons where all you see is the churning legs and a cloud of dust. 

We explored in the park for an hour and I ended up finishing with 18 and a half hot miles.  Ollie was happy.  I was relieved to be done.

The next weekend, last weekend I headed back up to the Wapack to do the north half with my buddy Paul.  We dropped a car at the Windblown parking area and started at the northern trail head on the other side of Pack Monadnock.  It was a nice cool morning and we ran the 12 back in a casual 3:19. 

Now you may say that that is really slow, but this is all technical mountain running and we weren’t in a hurry.  It was a good outing.  A good journey. 

If you look around you’ll see journeys everywhere.  All you need for a journey is a goal or a destination.  Journeys can be physical or spiritual or both. 

The ancient Egyptian kings thought of life and death as a journey.  The years were counted from the time the king took the throne.  When he died, he journeyed to the west to become one with the god Amun Rah.  The scribes painted nice, detailed maps on the inside of the coffin lid so they wouldn’t get lost.

The Greeks and Romans had Charon the ferryman to take them across the river Styx to the afterworld of Hades. The Christians had the Pilgrims Progress and Dante’s Inferno – each a version of how to make life’s journey in such a way as to make it to heaven.

Think about the Odyssey, with our hero journeying home through mostly self-inflicted challenges.  Or the 20th century modernist version that James Joyce penned about our friend Mr. Leopold Bloom on one peripatetic day in Dublin.  Or Conrad’s journey into the Heart of Darkness wonderfully reimagined by Coppola in Apocalypse Now.

(I know I’m throwing a lot at you, but I linked all these references in the show notes and the post)

My point is, whether it’s Huck Finn on the river or Jack Kerouac on the road the Western cannon is filled with physical, metaphorical and spiritual journeys.  That says something about us.  That highlights the deep correlation between our wanderlust and our redemption, our striving and our enlightenment.

The questions we ask every day are about where we are in the journey and what’s the destination?

We are you? 

On with the show!

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Trail Tempo - http://runrunlive.com/into-the-tempo

Voices of reason – the conversation

Rickey Gates - http://www.rickeygates.com/

Rickey Gates has been described as a “conceptual runner” combining the practice of endurance running with the artistic mediums of photography and writing. After nearly a decade competing on a national and international mountain, trail and ultra running circuit, he took his love for ultra-endurance, storytelling and photography to his project-based runs that have included a run across America, every single street in San Francisco and currently the 50 classic trails of North America.

Gates is a deeply curious individual with an immense interest in the inner workings of society, self, nature and the human potential.  His debut book Cross Country published by Chronicle Books, will be released in the spring of 2020. In this book, Gates invites us along on his 3,700 mile journey across the United States through over 200 photographs, stories of individuals and ultimately the innermost depths of his own mind. Cross Country will be released alongside TransAmericana, a feature-length film produced and directed by The Wandering Fever and his sole sponsor, Salomon.

CROSS COUNTRY

A 3700-MILE RUN TO EXPLORE UNSEEN AMERICA

In 2017, professional runner Rickey Gates ran 3,700 miles across the continental United States with just a small backpack and an anthropologist's curiosity to discover the divided America in which we live.

In the book Cross Country, Gates documents this epic experience from South Carolina to San Francisco, sharing first-person essays, interviews, and over 200 photographs of the ordinary and extraordinary people and places he saw along the way.

While Gates delivers unparalleled insight into the extreme athletic and mental challenge of this transcontinental run, running is not the core focus of Cross Country—it is a story of the remarkable people across the United States who we would otherwise never meet.

Cross Country is available online or anywhere else books are sold.

 

Section two – City of the dead – http://runrunlive.com/city-of-the-dead

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have journeyed through the long gauntlet of Episode 4-437 of the RunRunLive Podcast and ended our quest in the afterworld of delight.

My personal journey is going well.  I’m healthy and in good enough shape to manage the 42 miles of the Wapack on the 7th.  I’ve got Eric, and Dave Foss and Duane joining me.  It will probably take us around 12 hours. 

When I race the 18-mile version it takes me about 4 hours.  If you extend that out to 42 miles, it’s about 9 and a half hours.  I figure if we are taking our time and enjoying ourselves 12 hours should be good.  But, you never know in a long run like that.  You can get lost.  Someone can half a rough patch. 

As part of that run I’ll be doing 26.21 of those miles for the 2020 Boston Marathon.  Supposedly the BAA is sending out some sort of race kit for us to use in our virtual – we’ll see. 

The answer is Candide. Remember the quote I was trying to find for my history of agriculture article in the last show?  Well, no sooner did I hit publish then did our friend Keating Vogel, pop back with the answer.  He knew what I was trying to remember right away.  It was not Camus, nor was it Sophocles, it was Candide, by Voltaire that ended with the admonishment to ‘tend your garden’ that I was reading on that airplane so many years ago. 

Now I know that makes me sound super nerdy and pedantic – that I was riding around in airplanes in my 20’s reading the classics.  In my defense you could buy those old paperbacks of the classics for 25 cents.  I had a lot of plane time and hunted the book aisles for bargains.  You could always find the classics cheap because teachers would force school kids to read this stuff.  The kids would throw them away as soon as they could.

I had to look Candide up because for the life of me I couldn’t remember what it was about – other than those closing lines.  It didn’t make much of an impression on me.  I was probably reading it while elbow deep in complimentary cocktails. 

Apparently, it’s a satire about French institutions.  Like the church, the government and the nobility. 

And guess what Candide is doing in this novel?  He is on a journey to self-discovery!  So there you go.  It all comes back around. 

To finish up Our journey here today I’ll give you the happy update on my virtual race across Tennessee.  As of this morning 8/23/20, I am sitting at 623.5 miles.  This was supposed to be a 1,000-kilometer race but I guess in Tennessee they use different math because I need to get to 635 miles to get my buckle.

After today I’ll be at about 630 miles and I’m guessing I’ll finish Tuesday.  If I look back at the months, I ran 182 miles in May, took a week off in June and got behind with only 124 miles.  Bounced back with a stout 185 miles in the heat of July and will end up with about the same in August.  I’m ok with that given I’m only running 4 days a week.

What did we learn on this journey?  Well, I think people learned that it looks way easier to keep up with a 5.5 mile a day average then it actually is.  For some of us it’s just part of what we log and it’s no big deal.  For others having to knock out 5.5 miles every day taught them something about themselves. 

The mileage doesn’t care if it’s hot, or rainy or if you get sick or if you hurt your back.  The journey grinds on whether you can keep up or not. 

But, eventually my friends, no matter how long and difficult a journey you have, you will come out the other side enlightened. 

And I’ll see you out there.

(Outro bumper)

To take you out is Track number 15 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Brian’s Dirge”  And this is dedicated to my close friend and running buddy Frank, the drummer for the Nays who just got his second hip done last week.  Our journey and our adventures are not done!  

Enjoy

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4437.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:05pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-436 – Farm to Fork Fondo

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4435.mp3]
Link epi4435.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hellos and welcome to the badly delayed episode 4-436 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

Today’s show is about farming.  It’s about growing things.  It’s about the late summer harvest of ideas and endurance. 

We have a chat with retired professional cyclist Tyler Wren who has started a post-pro life around supporting local farms in Vermont called farm to fork fitness.  I ran into him because I’ve been doing a long bike ride at least once a week and thinking about the impact that the current apocalypse has had on these local farms and families. 

With the restaurants closed it impact specialized growers adversely.  The specialized stuff, the local stuff, is the good for you stuff.  I’d hate to see even more of them disappear.  To see even more beautiful tracks of rural land turned into vacation condos. 

In section one I’m going to muse on what my running has taught me in the month of July as I push through the heat and humidity. 

In section two I’m going to talk about the history of agriculture.   Because, that’s our theme. 

I’m doing fine, just busy with work and training and my wife needing me to do pointless man-things like paint the house.  It all stacks up and, you, my unfortunate friends are made to suffer the vacuum of my attentions. 

I’m healthy.  Ollie is healthy.  We’ve been getting in a lot of miles in the trails.  I’m starting to move into some fairly good volume as I target running the Wapack and back with Eric and anyone else who wants to come next month.  More about that in the outro.

My own garden is hit and miss this year. 

I planted a lot of squash but it seems to have gotten a late start and I’m only getting a few.  Whereas in other years I’ve gotten piles of zucchini and summer squash, this year only a few have battled through.  The root borers are into the stalks now and that usually kills anything left.

My berry patch has been less than spectacular as well.  I have a very mature and robust patch of red raspberries.  These are hybrids and have multiple sets of large berries.  But I’ve also got a bunch of the native black raspberry canes that are muscling their way into my garden like unwanted ruffians at a genteel social event. 

Both of these typically overwhelm me with berries. Not this year. 

We seem to have a boom in wildlife.  Something ate most of my red raspberries. I think it’s the birds.  I’m getting the Black ones now but they are getting poached as well.  In other years I would pull several pints a week out of the patch. This year I have salvaged barely enough to flavor 2 bowls of oatmeal.

My tomatoes are just coming on now.  A few weeks late.  I’m keeping an eye on them because I have a chipmunk problem as well.  The chipmunks won’t necessarily eat your tomatoes and squash but they will bite into them.  The rodents also burrow around a bit as well.  Ripping up the plants in general. 

They got my curly parsley.  I had it growing in a pot in my garden and something burrowed into the pot and ate the root.  Left the parsley.  Ate the root.  Then the next day they came back and ate the parsley.  Not sure whether that was the chipmunk or some other kind of rodent.  It was a very precisely executed crime.  I suspect on orders of the rodent syndicate.

Understand that my garden is heavily fortified.  This isn’t my first rodent rodeo.  I’ve got a 4-foot fence with chicken wire buried into the ground.  That keeps the Woodchucks and rabbits out.  Speaking of rabbits and woodchucks, I’ve given up on trying to trap the woodchucks and rabbits in the yard this year.  There are so many of them. 

There’s only one reasonable solution. I’m going to have to get a falcon.  Yup.  I’ll stand out there like an angry old god, whisper something to my hooded assassin and let my falcon swoop down and rain terror from above on all the various and sundry critters that impede my green thumb. 

I will be the raptor rodent apocalypse.

I’ve got some cucumbers coming, but those are late as well.  I have some pepper plants that seem to be doing well.  I replanted some beans that never came up and should have some of those to eat at the end of the month. 

The only successful plant in my garden is the kale.  Successful in the sense that I’ve got enough if I want to eat kale for lunch. The challenge with the kale is that it gets the cabbage worms on it and you can either spray them of try to pick them off.  It’s a battle that is currently about a tie.  Each day I go out and pick off and squish as many as I can find but each day the kale is full of holes like Swiss cheese.

So that’s it.  Hours of gardening to produce a handful of berries and some buggy kale.  If I was farming for a living I would have starved to death years ago. 

Each day I go out, because I’m working from home int eh apocalypse, and gather what ever seems to be ripe enough for my lunch salad.  I try to scrub the worms off the kale, but I know I’m eating a lot of bugs in my salads. It’s probably good for me. 

They recently re-examined human coprolites from the Paisley Caves in Oregon.  These had been dated to more than 14,000 years old.  The great glaciers were beating a hasty retreat.  The trouble was that everyone though homo sapiens only arrived 13,000 years ago.  They wrote these coprolites off as animal scat that was tainted by human handling. 

After reexamining them recently they discovered that this was indeed human poop from 14,000 years ago.  They were able to section that poop and see what we were eating as hunters and gatherers.  Turns out there wasn’t a lot of mastodon and buffalo.  Sure, there was the occasional bit of mammoth, but it was mostly plants and seeds and rodents with a fair number of insect carapaces. 

It would seem I haven’t progressed too far from  therewith my own garden. 

Think about that today as we talk about farming.  I have the advantage of water and modern seeds and I probably pulling 180 calories of vegetable out of that garden on a given day.  Think about the early farmers who had to grow enough calories to last a whole year, and that after giving 30% to some tyrant.

It’s not an easy job.  But there is something worthy about it.  There is something basic about getting your hands into the hot, wet soil and creating, nurturing the green things.  Weeding is contemplative.  Picking the perfect heirloom tomato warm from the vine is an act of fulfillment.

To be one of those self-important jerks who like to quote people, Kahil Gilbrainsaid

“And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair. ”

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – What I heard this week - http://runrunlive.com/what-running-taught-me-this-week

Voices of reason – the conversation

Tyler Wren - Farm to Fork

Farm to Fork Mission

To highlight and support the symbiotic relationship between everyday athletes, farmers, and beautiful landscapes

MESSAGE FROM OUR FOUNDER

 

 

Tyler Wren here, founder of Wrenegade Sports. When I retired from my 13 years of professional cycling I wanted to do something meaningful, something that would allow me to share some of the best parts of my fitness career with the world in way that could have a positive social impact, while still being just plain fun. I've run and ridden my bike thousands and thousands of miles over the world and I've learned to cherish the days when I find myself rolling along on beautiful, quiet country roads. Sadly, as many who love these charming places, I've realized that peaceful rural landscapes and lonely country roads are endangered species.

As athletes, it is natural for us to support land owners who are able to preserve the open space that we enjoy so much on our bicycles and in our fitness adventures. These landowners use that land to grow food that can make us better athletes and healthier people. With the Farm to Fork Fitness Adventure series, I want people to experience beautiful iconic farmland through exercise, meet the hardworking farmers who are fighting the good fight, learn about the pressures that these farms face, and have a great time in the process.

All of the funds raised by the Wrenegade Foundation’s Farm to Fork Healthy Communities Program is donated to local farms and community organizations. That means at the end of each Farm to Fork event, Wrenegade Foundation will be cutting checks to help local farmers with projects like building a new farm stand or creating a new website, and to help local organizations advance their causes like preserving the area’s beautiful pastoral open space. 

At Wrenegade Sports, we strive to whip up the perfect combinations of health, social good, community and fun into unique and awesome events. Find out more at the Wrenegade Sports website.

 

VOLUNTEER COMPETITION

 

 

In 2019, Wrenegade Foundation donated more than $40,000 to local organizations in our host communities via our Farm to Fork Volunteer Competitions. In 2020 we'll be giving away even more, and your votes help decide which groups get the biggest donations.

At each Farm to Fork event, all the volunteers will be assigned to teams that each represent a different area farm or charitable organization. From the registration tent to the last aid station, you will be greeted and cheered on by volunteers who are competing to bring the most spirit to the day. Ask questions of the volunteer teams to get to know them, their missions, and what makes the event host community unique. At the end of your ride, you will vote for your favorite team and help determine the size of the cash donations we give.

The Volunteer Competition is supported by tax-deductible participant donations to Wrenegade Foundation, sponsors, and 100% of all raffle ticket sales. 

 

Section two – Agriculture  – http://runrunlive.com/a-brief-history-of-agriculture

Outro

Ok my friends we have planted and weeded and harvested Episode 4-436 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

I’m still working from home.  I’ve pushed my mileage up a notch by adding a long run into Sundays.  This weekend I’ll do 3 hours.  But, this is at the end of a hard workout on Friday and a long bike ride on Saturday – so it’s significant, for me. 

I feel strong.  I’ve been having some fatigue and I need to watch my dehydration at times but I feel strong.  Ollie has been getting out with me on most runs.  He’s still crazy but he’s good with people and other dogs in the woods so I can let him off leash.  His longest run so far is 14 miles.  He’s lost all the baby fat and he’s lean ad hard.  A real athlete. 

My plan to run the Wapack and back on September 7th has been finalized.  It’s 43 mile s of technical mountain running.  Eric is coming up from Missouri.  I plan to log the firs 26.2 as my 2020 Boston Marathon.  That will be my 21st Boston.  We’ve had the storms, the heat and the bombs.  Now we get the trails. 

I went out with my buddy Paul a couple weekends back and we did 13 miles of the Wapack.  It was a beautiful, bright July day.  We were out for just under 4 hours but I felt fine.  Eric, make sure to bring your camera and we’ll make one of those cool race movies!

I’ve been reading a lot and working a lot.  I read my way through a 5 book SciFi series called “The Lost Fleet”.  Who knows when I’ll need to know how to maneuver a space fleet in battle at near relativistic speeds, but when I do, I’ll be ready. 

After Wapack, I don’t know what I’ll train for.  Maybe I’ll treat the Groton Marathon as a real race and train for it?  Who knows.  I’m out of qualification and I’m going to be 58 this fall.  That means I still have to qualify at the harder standard if I want to keep running Boston.  Some little voice inside is whispering that it just isn’t that important anymore. 

I read Rickey Gate’s book about running across America last night.  It was mostly photos.  I still think I’d like to do that.  It seems so real and so visceral.  I’m talking to him about having a chat. 

I’ve been wearing my old two-bottle slant pack on my trail runs.  I don’t need the bottles but I use the pack to carry my old iPhone so I can listen to podcasts without having to carry the phone. 

That’s my kit. 

A bottle in one hand, the dogs leash wrapped around the other, my JayBird Tarah Bluetooth headphones and the old two-bottle waist pack to carry the phone. 

It occurred to me that it gives me two empty bottle slots which I use to pickup litter.  I keep an eye out on my road sections for cans and bottles that have been thrown out the windows of passing cars.  I’ve made a game out of trying to pick up my 2-can quota on my runs.  Most of them I can return for a nickel with my other recyclables.

We play these games, don’t we.  We tell these stories.  Each run, each set of runs is its own narrative.  The run is an empty envelope that we fill with our stories.  In this isolated world of apocalypse we create stories to fill the void.  To find meaning. To keep sane. 

I read a great article on not having enough time to do everything you want.  I’ll link to it here.  The author, Kira Newman, explains how that feeling of never having enough time works.

If the work you do gives you a sense of accomplishment you don’t see it as wasted time.  Instead of being the 100 things you have to do before you can do what you want it is the list of things you accomplish.  There’s a subtle difference and it makes a difference on how we perceive time spent.

When we see our activities as in conflict with each other we feel more stress about time scarcity.  I can either do this or do that.  They compete for the same time resource.  People who see those competing activities as additive and congruent don’t feel the time stress.  It’s ‘this or that’ in their minds it’s ‘this and that’.  Again, a subtle difference, but a big one in terms of perception.

What it really comes down to is a sense of control.  If you feel like you’re in control of your time you won’t feel time stress for the same amount of activity.  That’s why planning helps sometimes.  Until it doesn’t’ help.  Right now I’m having one of those days where my plan had me finished my workout and the podcast and on my way to the Cape an hour ago.  That didn’t happen and now I’m throwing things out of the boat to try to keep up. 

It turns out that money doesn’t’ help either.  There is a direct correlation between how much money you have and how much time stress you have.  It’s not the correlation you’d expect.  Rich people see their time as more valuable and they have more time stress. 

What can you do?  Why do you care?  You can’t do everything.  Choose a comfortable mix of things you want to do and things you need to do.  Don’t stress about it.  You can workout when you get to the Cape.  You don’t really need to clean the chain on your bike.  Do what you can.  Let the rest go. 

It turns out that time stress has nothing to do with how much time you have because we all have the same amount of time.  Time stress is caused by the way you value your time and its use.  

Make your decisions and find comfort in that control.  You have the control over your choice and nobody is goin g to care in 14,000 years whether you cleaned the toilets today.

And I’ll see you out there.

(Outro bumper)

To take you out is Track number 14 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Bobby LeFavre” – which I thought I put into the last show but I thin I missed it – because, hey, yah know, I was behind schedule and in a rush!

Enjoy

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4436.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 10:46pm EDT

Sorry couldn't get a show out last week.  Workin' on it. 

Direct download: PSA-7-27-20.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:01am EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-435 – The Athlete’s Gut

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4435.mp3]
Link epi4435.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hey Folks - Hello and welcome to episode 4-435 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

So, here we are.  Mid-July in New England.  And all that brings with it.  The deer flies are thick as college students on a Florida beach.  The days are long and weather is a dirty soup-like mixture that drains the sap right out of you when you’re outside.  People are slowing down a bit and easing off to vacation houses for a bit of lock-down in a different place.  

Ollie and I have been getting out for 8 or so miles in the woods 3 days a week. Then I’ve been mixing in a long bike ride on Saturday with a longish run on Sunday mornings.  My legs are tired but I have a good cadence going.  Even with only 4 days of running I’ll end up with 40 miles this week.  I’m catching up on the Great Virtual Run across Tennessee.  I should pass the buzzard this week. 

This week - and I’m speaking to you from Sunday afternoon now - this week I ran Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in the woods with Ollie.  Saturday, I talked my running buddies into riding the Great Circum Groton Fondo with me yesterday that ended up being 37 ish easy road bike miles in the sun.  It was a hoot.  We stopped for muffins in Pepperell center about half way in – so that will give you an idea of the intensity with which we were riding!

I guess I have to back up a bit.  My friend Gordon, who is my friend Frank’s brother, (I run with Frank every Sunday), Gordon had this idea of setting up a relay race that went all the way around Groton, the town I grew up in and where my running club is based, without actually touching Groton at any point.  I borrowed his course and we rode it on bikes yesterday. 

I toyed with making it into a real event for charity and such, but there wasn’t much interest, so we just went out and had a good long ride. 

Then this morning I got up early and ran 4.5 miles of trails with Ollie, then went and met the guys at 8:00 for another 10 on the road.  A nice mix.  Done by 10:00.  I’m whipped!  I could nap! 

I’m getting a good balanced set of miles in.  I’m avoiding most of the heat.  I’m giving the dog enough exercise to stay sane. 

Last weekend Ollie and I went down to our house in Cape Cod for the 4th of July.  I ended up coming back early because it was just too crowded and frantic.  I didn’t even attempt to go do my annual; beach run or my long ride on the rail trail.  Maybe I’m turning into a hermit, but I was a bit disconcerted by all the people and how stressed out they were, so I came back. 

Today We are going to talk about all kinds of bodily fluids.  Actually we are going to talk about ‘The Athlete’s Gut’ with Dr. Patrick Wilson.  It’s his new book from Velo Press that answers the questions around why do I get nauseous or gassy or poopy when I’m running and racing?  In section One I’m going to talk about sweat – because I realize that my half hearted treatment of hot weather running was a bit thin.  In Section two I’ll talk about why certainty in an uncertain environment is so powerful.

My work is very busy, but I’m having a good summer.  I actually threw my hat in the ring for another role at this company.  I have an interview tomorrow.  I know there are a lot of job seekers out there these days.  So I have a tip for you. 

There will come a point in that interview where you will get a hard question that you don’t know the answer to and when you do, you lean back, get a faraway look in your eyes, channel your inner Rutger Hauer and say:

“I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain..”

That won’t get you the job but you’ll be the topic of conversation in HR for weeks!

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Sweat - http://runrunlive.com/lets-talk-about-sweat

Voices of reason – the conversation

Patrick Wilson

Patrick Wilson is an associate professor of exercise science and directs the Human Performance Laboratory at Old Dominion University. He earned a PhD in exercise physiology from the University of Minnesota and completed post-doctoral training in sports nutrition at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Wilson has authored over 50 scientific articles that span the disciplines of exercise science, sports nutrition, and health. He is the author of the recently released book, The Athlete's Gut: The Inside Science of Digestion, Nutrition, and Stomach Distress. Wilson is also a credentialed registered dietitian through the Commission on Dietetic Registration.

 The gut does many wondrous things for us. Without it, we surely couldn’t exist. For many an athlete, however, the gut can also be a source of consternation before, during, and after exercise. Have you ever made a pre-race trip to the Porta Potty due to an uneasy gut? Or ducked into some roadside greenery mid-race because of an angry bowl? Or hurled up your breakfast in the loo before a big game? If yes, you’re just one of the innumerable number of athletes that have been plagued by gut issues.

What is so often vexing about these gut problems is that they can have many different causes, and consequently, they often aren’t fixable with a single solution. Thankfully, there is now a resource available for athletes to turn to when they are struggling with gut issues: The Athlete’s Gut. It is without a doubt the most comprehensive, accessible book on how exercise and sport competition affect the gut. It helps makes sense of the complicated gastrointestinal tract and offers potential solutions to many of the digestive troubles that plague athletes, from the recreational to the elite. The Athlete’s Gut is a must-read for any athlete who is experiencing gastrointestinal problems that interfere with training or competition, as well as for coaches and practitioners that work with such athletes.

Written by Dr. Patrick Wilson, assistant professor of exercise science and registered dietitian, The Athlete’s Gut combines the latest research on exercise and the gut with humorous descriptions and relatable, real-life anecdotes. After reading this book, athletes will better understand the inner workings of their own gut and will be equipped to implement strategies to perform—and feel—better.

 

https://theathletesgut.com/

 

 

Patrick B. Wilson, PhD, RD

Associate Professor

Human Movement Sciences

Old Dominion University

2003A Student Recreation Center

Norfolk, VA 23529

https://www.odu.edu/directory/people/p/pbwilson#profiletab=1

https://twitter.com/SportsRD_PhD

 

Section two – Certainty in uncertain times  – http://runrunlive.com/certainty-in-uncertain-times

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have run, clutching our side in gastrointestinal stress to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-435.

I registered for the virtual Boston Marathon, it was $50.  And, Apparently I was one of the first 15,000 so I get some special, super-secret care package from the BAA. 

I have a plan.  I am going to run my Boston as part of a 43 mile out and back on the Wapack Trail on September 7th.  I would love company if any of you can come up.  We are going to start at Watatic and run to the end of the Wapack Trail on the back side of Pack Monnadnock, turn around and run back.  This is the double of the race I ran in the spring a couple years ago. 

This will take us 10-12 hours.  My friend Eric is coming up to join, because he can’t resist stupid shit like this.  I will be able to wrangle some basic on course hydration support, but nothing fancy.  Since it’s an out and back people can turn around any point they want.

The Wapack is typical New England mountain trail.  Mostly single-path and highly technical.  Lot’s of elevation gain and loss, basically running the spine of a mountain range.  In September the forest will be thick and shady, except where you break out on to the tops of the mountains. 

The weather is a crap shoot.  You can get very hot days, well hot for us, mid-80’s.   You can get the tail end of a hurricane with cold rain.  That’s part of the fun.  For the most part it’s very sheltered from the weather under the canopy. 

So – that’s what I’ll be training for.  That’s my summer project. 

I’ve been listening to a history of ancient Egypt.  And since we have been talking about digestion and hydration I have a story for you.  I would imagine you are familiar with the electrolyte mix called Nuun?  I can’t prove it but I’d like to think they based that name on the Egyptian creation myth. 

In the beginning, all that existed was the sacred water.  The lifeless sacred waters from which all things would be made were called Nun.  They were the waters of chaos and the waters of everything.  

The first god Atum created himself from the Nun.  He got bored with being the only god so he decided to create some more gods and other stuff, like all the rest of the stuff we have in this world.  Now he didn’t have a partner to do anything procreative with so he, umm, ‘handled that situation himself’ and fertilized the Nun from which everything else came into being. 

So…Think about that the next time you take a big swig of that warm, sweet, cloudy Nuun at mile 40 of your ultra. 

And I’ll see you out there.

(Outro bumper)

To take you out is Track number 14 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Bobby LeFavre”

Enjoy

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4435.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 5:31pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-434 – Your Training Plans with the Coach

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4434.mp3]
Link epi4434.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hey Folks - Hello and welcome to episode 4-434 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

Today we have a long and thoughtful conversation with my coach about his new book that encapsulates his training methods.

In the couple weeks since we last talked I’ve been ramping up my training a bit.  It’s gotten hot a few days now that we’re into summer up here.  But it’s still cool in the mornings. The deer flies are out in force as well. 

It’s not terrible. With the heat and the bugs there are far fewer people in the woods to contend with.  We are going to talk about running in the heat in section one.  I’ve resurrected my old slant pack that can carry two bottles and I’m wearing that.  But more importantly it gives me a place to put the old iPhone 6 I’m using as an iPod. 

That means I can stow a bottle, and the phone to leave my hands free to carry the leash.  And sometimes that leash has a crazy border collie on the end of it, so having both hands free is an advantage.  The heat slows him down a bit too.

As for the flies I wear a bug hat – which is a contraption whereby you attach a bandana to the back of one of your running hats, Lawrence of Arabia style, to thwart the aggressive swarms that try to bite you in the head and face. Then I spray that with good old bug spray.  It works for the most part but you do get the occasional suicide attack in the eye or mouth.  I did manage to eat and swallow one today when I was out with my buddies. 

If you want to see how to make a fly hat I think I posted a youtube video a couple years back on my channel cyktrussell.  Just search for ‘fly’.  You may get a video of me dancing to the Offspring’s ‘Pretty Fly for a White Guy’ – but probably not. Thank God there wasn’t ubiquitous personal video when I was growing up.

In section two I’m going talk about bringing the energy.  This goes back to the message of controlling what you can control.  

I’ve been getting my runs in like I said.  I lost a week to the sore back and that put me behind in my Virtual Race Across Tennessee.  I logged close to 40 miles this week so I’m clawing it back and should catch the buzzard if I can avoid any more injuries. 

I’ve also been working in a bike ride a week in preparation for a group ride I’m hoping to host in July.  More on the in the outro.

I did get my stand up desk.  I put it together this weekend.  It’s called an AirLift and I got it from Costco for $230.  So far so good. 

I have a shoe site for you to check out.  I have held off buying a new pair of Hoka Trail shoes because they are so damn expensive.  Searching around a little for a shoe with a similar cushioning profile I found the Fresh Foam shoes from New Balance that seem to be pretty good.  It takes a couple runs for the foam to form to your feet, but then the ride is pretty good.

I don’t need much shoe, but I still need the cushioning and the heel drop or I get PF and Achilles problems when I start loading on the miles.  Links in the show notes.  Take a look at Joesnewbalanceoutlet.com – all one word.  You can get some decent neutral cushion Fresh Foam shoes for $30-$40.  At that price, even if you can’t run in them you can use them for sneakers.

I was coming back from a trail run with Ollie yesterday.  I was walking up my front walk.  I have a guy working on the house and he was sitting on a ladder there.  Of course I catch a toe and faceplant right in front of this kid.  I was checking texts or something.

He says “Are you alright?” 

I smile, brush off the dirt and say, “Yeah, I’m ok, I’m indestructible.

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Heat Advisory - http://runrunlive.com/heat-advisory

Voices of reason – the conversation

Coach Jeff Kline

https://teamprsfit.com

https://teamprsfit.com/about-us/

Team Prs Fit is a community of athletes from all over the world. We are a team. Alone or together, we strive and we conquer.

Prs Fit lets you experience what we call community and social fitness – connecting and motivating each other through our one of a kind global community experience.

No matter the weather, the circumstance, day after day, we provide a high quality training experience that produces results.

Section two – Bring the energy  – http://runrunlive.com/bringing-the-energy

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have run in a periodic progression of fitness through the training pyramid to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-434

Going forward I’ve adjusted some things.  I let Rachel know I’m going to stop tracking my nutrition.  I got down close to 170 and with the additional miles now I’m tracking very well to stay lean.  I don’t think of this as a particularly big adjustment because it’s my new normal for the past 5 or so years, but I was 10-15 pounds heavier before.  I’ve still got a little gut, but I feel pretty good at this size. 

I just don’t’ want to track my weight every day during the summer. It’s summer! I want to be able to eat some of those summer things, in moderation, that I love. 

I’ve also resurrect Fuji-san my 20+ year old steel racing bike and I’ve been getting some rides in. I’m trying to organize a group ride for charity in July. I’ve got a course that goes around the periphery of Groton that is about 40 miles which is about the right distance. Long enough to be a challenge but short enough not to be exclusive.  I’m still working out the details.

I’m also setting my sites on running the Wapack Trail end-to-end and back around Labor Day.  I was waiting to see when the Boston virtual race would be held and maybe feed two birds with one scone.  But that would be in the mid-forties of miles.  It’s all technical, mountain running.  The 18 mile version takes me about 4 hours so this version will probably take 10 hours.

If either of these things sounds like a fun adventure, give me a shout, I’d love the company.

All the fall races are canceling now as well.  The only one I see that is still on is Marine Corp. Which, if we’re honest, is the worst marathon you should be holding in a pandemic.  It’s super crowded.  It’s all slow runners and new marathoners.  Everyone crams onto mass transit to get to and from it. 

They canceled the Bad Water 135 which is a couple hundred ultra-fiends in Death Valley and they hold Marine Corp with 50,000 amateurs in the middle of a city?

Anyhow, I’m good.  Still training.  Still working out of the house.  Albeit standing up more now. 

I watched my way through Season one of American Gods.  I loved the book.  I finally broke down and bought the show.  It’s really good. I like Ian McShane as Mr. Wednesday.  Which anyone with a working knowledge of the history of the English language can tell you which god he is. 

My garden is coming along nicely.  This last few weeks of hot weather has kicked it into high gear.  Garden is the same word in French and English.  It comes from the Indo European root for the enclosure. It has the same root as guard and guardian. The same root gives us ‘yard’ in America.

To take you out I want you to remember that as endurance athletes we are well equipped for the apocalypse.  Everyone knows good cardio is important during a zombie attack. Not only that, we trail runners are used to pooping in the woods – another valuable skill in the apocalypse. 

So, just remember, if society fails into chaos you can always run away and poop in the woods.

And I’ll see you out there.

(Outro bumper)

To take you out is Track number 13 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Here, There and Everywhere."

Enjoy

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4434.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 6:25pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-433 – Eric Runs Across Missouri

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4433.mp3]
Link epi4433.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-433 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

Been a weird couple of weeks for me. I’ve been working out of the house, which I’m a bit used to, but the new bit is this part about being on video calls all day long for many days with no break.  It can be really exhausting. 

I’ve got a guy replacing all the trim boards on my house over the last couple weeks as well.  So I’ve got him banging on the wall while I’m trying to talk to people.  Which is the new normal.  People just forget they’re on these calls and all kinds of crazy stuff goes on in the background. 

Him ripping the boards off has disturbed the hornets that live in the eaves.  I had one wandering around my bathroom one morning.  And as much as I tried to avoid it, it ended up stinging me a little.  Hornets are ferocious little critters.  Bad attitudes. 

Up here in New England the seasons have flipped and all is green.  The mosquitoes and ticks are out. I’m harvesting lettuce from my garden.  Good year for lettuce.

Immediately after we last spoke I woke up with a back issue.  I don’t know what I did but my back locked up.  It’s a problem I’ve had before when I do too much snow shoveling or something like that.  It is very painful.  You can’t bend and it hurts to sit, hurts to walk, just hurts.  Your lower back is such an integral part of everything you do. 

Got up the second morning of this and basically had to crawl on my hands and knees to the bathroom.  Went to my chiro on the third day and got some immediate relief.  It’s still pretty sore this week but I think that has to do with spending so much time in the chair.  I’ve started doing some of these meeting standing up, but you’re still constrained and hunched. 

The end result was I took a week totally off from training and it was surprisingly relaxing.  Was a good break to reenergize and rethink what I want to do with my training and racing going forward. 

I’m still on my nutrition plan and hovering around 170 pounds but I’m losing enthusiasm for it as we move into summer and all the good eats and drinks that are part of that!

I’m back to running now and feel good.  I’m going to pivot to some longer trail based training.  I’m working on cooking up some events in the fall. 

Today we talk to our old friend Eric who I ran Leadville with last year.  He did something amazing by running across Missouri on Memorial Day weekend.

In section one I’ll talk about taking a week off.  In section two I’ll talk about some ways to recharge in today’s weird hyper-work world. 

As I write this on a fine cool morning that looks like it will emerge into a humid summer day I’ve got a purple T-shirt on.  I have been wearing shirts with collars all week to try to look somewhat professional on the video, but this morning I saw a nice purple race T under the pile so I’m wearing that.

Did you know that purple is the royal color?  It was a prized color in classical times.  The Greeks and Romans somehow figured out that a predatory land snail in Lebanon, that they called murex, secreted this color and they could make that into dye. 

In the Eastern Roman Empire, what we would refer to as the Byzantine Empire, but that’s a construct of modern historians, they just called themselves Romans, anyhow, they referred to a person being of royal blood or royal pedigree as “Being born in the purple”. 

Isn’t it amazing how we humans can make the leap from snail snot to justification of royalty?  We really do have an outstanding ability to make stuff up and believe in it. 

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – A week off - http://runrunlive.com/7-benefits-of-taking-a-week-off

Voices of reason – the conversation

Eric Strand

Section two – Recharge  – http://runrunlive.com/eat-sleep-work-repeat

Outro

Well, my friends, you have run across Missouri to the well-deserved micro-brewery that is at the end of the RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-433 – Thank you for your company!

Alrighty.  So what now?  I have decided to pivot my training for the summer.  Instead of the holding pattern of marathon training I’m going to target some ultra-distance trail running and some casual bike riding. 

For a few reasons.  First, because I’m feeling a bit too fragile with all this race-specific training and need to broaden up for a cycle.  Second, if any races are going to be run this fall, they are going to be longer, smaller trail races.  And, bike riding to get some cross training and most of the guys in my cohort can’t run as much anymore so Some casual bike riding is a good way to spend time with friends.  

I’m contemplating organizing a Fondo around Groton with my running club for July.  And some dort of longer trail run, perhaps on the Wapack for Labor day, which, by the way would kill two birds with one stone by logging 26.1 miles of it for the virtual Boston.

And I’m behind on my virtual race across Tennessee from taking a week off.  I’m 4 days behind, which isn’t much.  It’s only like 20 miles, but some longer sessions would help me get back in the hunt so I can finish before 8/31.  Eric, BTW, with all his shenanigans is finishing this week.

OK – so those are my loose plans.  I’ll tell you a couple stories and a dad joke for Father’s Day and we can all get on with our lives.

Switching back to the trails is good because I can take Ollie with me.  The challenge is he’s not leash trained yet, so he’s a bit of a nightmare to run with on leash.  With the Apocalypse the woods are just stuffed with cranky people and I unless it’s off-hours I have to put him on leash. 

I have the standard 6-foot leash.  He goes right to the end of that and pulls.  No matter how much I correct him he’s constantly leaning on the leash.  It’s exhausting.  It’s also a bit dangerous because he stays right in my line of sight and occludes my line on the trails. 

Makes it hard to carry anything in my hands with all the jerking about. 

He won’t go near the ponds or lakes to get a drink because he’s decided he’s afraid of them.  He won’t drink out of my bottle, either, because he doesn’t trust me not to squirt him.  I’m gong to have to get some sort of collapsible dish for him that I can carry. 

There is a boom population of rabbits, squirrels and chipmunks this year and he likes to take off after those as well.  Friday, when we were out, and he was on leash, a big snake ran across the trail in front of us.  I saw it and calculating its progress could see it would be well out of our way by the time our paths intersected and I didn’t bother to break pace. 

We don’t have any poisonous snakes in New England.  Ok, technically there is an Eastern Timber Rattlesnake and the Copperhead viper, but those are both endangered and you have a better chance of getting hit by lightning. 

Anyhow, Ollie saw that snake and jumped backwards, causing me to have to jump vertically to vault him.  It’s funny how the fear of snakes is so deeply ingrained in us mammals.  Lots’ of bad blood between us and the reptiles I guess over the millennia. 

I had him out Saturday in the trails, mostly on leash and he was a nightmare.  You’d think he’d get tired of dragging my fat ass around after a few miles.  He joined me today for and hour and forty five minutes on a combination of rail trail and roads with my buddies. 

I was on the rail trail around 7:00 AM.  I brought my old iPhone and my headphones, figuring I’d be all alone at 7 Amon a cool Sunday morning and could catch up on some listening.  I brought the extendable leash which I think is about 15 feet.  He pulls less on that one, probably because it has some built in resistance and partly because it gives him more line. 

Because, you know, Apocalypse… I was to have no peace.  The trail was packed.  Bikes, joggers, walkers and some lady screaming into her cellphone in Spanish – it was like taking public transit on a Friday Afternoon when the Red Sox are playing.  I had to take out my headphones so I could hear the traffic or someone was going to die. 

The new herd of Apocalypse bikers are not going very fast. Some are barely moving faster than my running pace.  Which is fine but it’s takes forever for them to catch you and pass you.  Especially if you’re trying to control a mental border collie.  If you’re a heads down cyclist training away at 20+ miles an hour in aero I would stay away from public rail trails for awhile. It’s a bit of a carnival. 

And here’s your Dad joke for Father’s Day. 

A hamburger walks into a bar.  He goes up to the bartender and says “I’d like a bowl of Chili please.”

The bartender looks at him and says, “Sorry, we don’t serve food here.”

Keep moving friends,

It ain’t all bad, is it?

I’ll see you out there.

 

(Outro bumper)

To take you out is Track number 12 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Hold on tight to your dreams"

Enjoy

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4433.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 4:55pm EDT

Folks, I am re-releasing episode 4-310 where I interviewed Bryan Lions so we could all hear his voice and listen to his story.

Chris,

http://www.runrunlive.com/PodcastEpisodes/Bryan.mp3

 

...

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-310 – Bryan Lyons on Pushing Rick in 2015

(Audio: link)

[audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4310.mp3]

Chris-Bryan-Dick-RickLink epi4310.mp3

Intro Bumper:

https://www.crowdrise.com/TeamHoytBoston2015/fundraiser/christopherrussell

Hello my friends, this is Chris your host and this is the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-310.  Welcome.  We are in our final days of taper leading into the Boston Marathon.  I’m ready.  I’m right on my target race weight, I’m strong in the legs and I’ve done it a few times before.
I’m starting from the back this year in the last charity corral.  It will take me awhile to get to the starting line and it will be crowded.  Looks like we’re getting decent weather, cool and rainy.  That’s actually my favorite racing weather.

Chris-b4-Boston-2015One of my friends from the running club is getting a limo to take a bunch of us out to Hopkinton on Monday morning.  There’s no checked bags from Hopkinton anymore so we’ll have to navigate the cool, wet weather on the morning with some throw away stuff.  There will be a wind.  I don’t know yet if it’s a head wind on not but as far back in the pack as I am there’s lots of shelter if you know what I mean.

I don’t know if I’ll be carrying my phone or not.  I’d love to be unplugged but I don’t know how to get it into Boston otherwise without being separated from it for a day.  It turns out this new iPhone6 fits perfectly into one of those ½ size snack baggies and you can use the phone through the plastic.

Today we have the great privilege to speak with Bryon Lyons who is taking over for Dick Hoyt in Pushing Rick this year.  It’s a long one, but’s that’s ok.  I think we cover some good ground.

In the first section I’m going to muse on this year’s Boston from my perspective, as is my annual tradition.

In the second section we’ll talk about how to use an external brain to get important stuff done.

Buddy-2015I’m good to go for Monday.  I have a red Team Hoyt singlet that I’ll probably put a long sleeve shirt on underneath because of the weather.  It’s also got some rough bits that I’d like to keep off my nipples!

I still need to swing by Whole Foods and pick up some Hammer Gels for the race.  I tried to cook up my own energy gels from organic peanut butter and cocoa powder but it was a disaster.  It was like when you give a dog a spoonful of peanut butter and their mouth gets all stuck.  I’ll have to keep working on that.  Damn near choked me to death on my last couple long runs.

We might go long today, but I’ll keep my comments short.

On with the Show!

it-all-starts-hereSection one - Running Tips

Tapering into Boston

http://runrunlive.com/boston-taper-time

Voices of reason – the interviews

bryanlyonsandhoyts_500Bryan Lyons

From Runners World

“Team Hoyt Racing at Boston With a Different Look

For the first time since 1980, Dick Hoyt won’t run behind his son. But Bryan Lyons, a longtime supporter and runner, takes up the cause.

By Liam Boylan-Pett;

April 9, 2015

Rick and Dick Hoyt with Bryan Lyons

Bryan Lyons (left, bib number 33864) at the 2014 Boston Marathon with Dick and Rick Hoyt.

In 2014, Dick Hoyt completed the Boston Marathon for the 32nd time—each year pushing his son Rick, who’s a spastic quadriplegic with cerebral palsy, in a custom-racing wheelchair. After last year’s race, Dick wanted to retire. Rick, however, wanted to cover the 26.2 miles from Hopkinton to Boston again.

He’s going to—this year with a new running partner. Dr. Bryan Lyons, a dentist in Billerica, Massachusetts, and a family friend of the Hoyts, will push Rick in the 119th running of Boston.

“It was sort of shocking for [Dick] to ask me,” Lyons told the Lowell Sun. "My friends told me [the Hoyts] don't want the big name, they want the big heart. If that's the least that I can provide, I'm happy."

This will be the seventh Boston Marathon for Lyons, 44, who has run for the Hoyt Foundation marathon team since 2008, with a best of 4:15:29, which he ran in 2010.

Lyons does have some experience running with Rick, 53. Since January, the two have completed a few shorter local road races and gone on training runs together, according to the Lowell Sun. If Rick isn’t available, Lyons puts sandbags into the wheelchair to simulate his weight.

Although Dick Hoyt, 74, won’t be running, he won’t absent from the marathon. He’s the race’s grand marshal, and will ride in a pace car ahead of the lead runners.

The Hoyt’s story, chronicled by Runner’s World in 2007, has inspired many. Since 1977 when Rick asked Dick to push him through a 5-mile race, the father-son duo has completed more than 1,100 races, including Ironman triathlons.

“Dick will continue to be at the head of the field, leading 30,000 runners on their trek to Boston,” Tom Grilk, Executive Director of the Boston Athletic Association, said in a press release. “Dick and Rick Hoyt will forever be synonymous with the Boston Marathon and the sport of running.”

Now, Lyons’ name will be attached, too. Once Dick decided not to run, Lyons was an easy choice for the Hoyts.

"Bryan will be out there, and he'll do his best, we know that," Dick Hoyt told the Lowell Sun. "He's a great athlete, a great person, and the type of person that we want to be pushing Rick. And Rick wants Bryan to be the one to do it."

Section Two – Life Lessons

External BrainUsing an External Brain –

http://runrunlive.com/the-power-of-the-external-brain

Outro

palmtressThat’s it my friends.  Episode 4-310 in the can.  We’ll see what happens over the weekend.  I may do a race report or not.  It’s a lot of work to write something that I am proud of.  You don’t really know the appropriate theme until the race has been run, so you can’t prepare that much.

I’ve got the Groton Road Race coming up on the 26th and we’ve still got shirts if you want to register.  We’d love to have you.  Then I’m going in to get my heart fixed.  Then…it will be summer time and the living will be easy.

I was out in California this past week.  I flew out Saturday and came back on the redeye Tuesday night.  I was in Huntington Beach.  You may or may not know that Huntington Beach is known as Surf City USA. This is one of the centers of the surfing culture from Southern California.

There are surf shops and beach cruiser bikes and classic cars cruising in circles.   It’s a surfer vibe.

Sunday I was wandering around the resort, killing some time before dinner and ended up going into a surf shop, where they sell shirts, baggy shorts and flip flops to the tourists.  There were a couple young guys lounging behind the counter.  They were your surfer dude types.  Being me, I figured I’d chat them up.

I say “You guys look tired and bored.”

To which the one guy replies, “Yeah, we’re the surf instructors but they make us work in here.”

And the other dude says, “Yeah, man, Long night, ya know?”

I nod, as if I can commiserate.

He thinks I don’t understand.  “I was up all night man, you know those Spanish girls…”

I try to act like that’s something I can relate to as I stand there in my business suit and mid-life crisis look.

He still thinks I don’t get it and says, “Ya know, man? The 6-2?”

I agree and move on, wondering what the hell ‘the 6-2’ means.

I tell the story to the guys I’m with and we come up with all sorts of theories around body type ratios and start-stop times.  We Google it but the urban dictionary, while having some fairly unsettling definitions, doesn’t quite fit.

We spend the next couple days asking people and not getting any good answers.  I go back to the shop but the dudes aren’t working.

At dinner that night I can see that the busboy is clearly a surfer dude cut from the same cloth.  I call him over and tell him my story in a conspiratorial and hushed way, finishing with the big question.  “What does ‘the 6-2’ mean?

He says “Well bro, it’s kinda hard to explain…”

I say “Just give it your best shot…”

He continues. “Well it just mean he was tappin that shit all night long…”

The mystery was solved.  That’s all it meant. There were not ratios or timing or measurements involved.

Now you know.  You’ve got early access to some surf slang. I can see the ultra runners using this one.  How was the middle 50 miles?  “It was the 6-2, bro, all trail, all night…”

With that I will leave you to your own adventures.  Don’t wait.  Step put the door and do it today.  There will never be a good or convenient time to do epic stuff.

Enjoy your race.

I’ll see you out there.

https://www.crowdrise.com/TeamHoytBoston2015/fundraiser/christopherrussell

http://www.grotonroadrace.com/

Closing comments

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

 

Direct download: Bryan.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:50pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-432 – Running through the Pandemic

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4432.mp3]
Link epi4432.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-432 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

How are you doing?  Really, how are you doing?  This is a powerful question.  I find myself slipping more and more into a coaching and advising role as I get deeper into my career.  And these past couple weeks I’ve found that to be a very useful and powerful question. 

And a gift.  How are you doing?  Start your conversation by leaning into that zoom call, smiling, in a concerned way into that grainy laptop camera and asking ‘How are you doing?’ Then sit back and be prepared to listen, to be empathetic.  To nod understandingly.  That’s an enormous gift you can give these days.

I’m doing ok.  I’ve been working on my nutrition still.  I’ve gotten close to 170 a couple days but keep popping back up to 175 ish as soon as I eat something.  It’s a bit frustrating.  I’m not getting enough miles in my training to move the needle. 

We’ve got a good and timely show today.  I sit down with our friend Dr. Greg to talk about some practical strategies for coming out of the apocalypse. 

In section one I’ll talk a bit about some strategies to turn all these nascent runners into life-long runners.

In section two I’ll talk about made up things, probably also timely.

So – they canceled Boston.  It had been rescheduled to September.  But, they sent an email to us yesterday that the race was being canceled.  It seems like you can get a refund and there is going to be some sort of virtual race, but it will take a couple days for all the details to be sure. 

If you were paying attention you got to see Mayor Marty Walsh.  That is the face of every Irish politician in Boston right there.  May-yah Mahty.   That’s the face of the Statey at the airport waving you along.  ‘Yah can’t Pahk Heah!”, or leaning in your car window looking for ‘License and Registration’. 

Anyhow…

I was running on a charity bib this year, not sure how that works now.  I’m out of qualification. 

Funny thing is that I’m in good shape.  I’ve got no injuries and have been basically training since December!  With my recent weight loss and nutrition I’m running fast, for me.  I think the only thing missing is a couple big volume weeks and I could race well. 

I’ve been doing a lot of shorter tempo runs and have been hitting good paces even on my tired days.  I don’t feel like I’m in great shape.  I feel like I’m old and tired and slow.  My legs are achy and sore especially my quads on the uphills – but my tempo is in the mid-7’s – which is a minute off my PR’s from 20 years ago – but I only need an 8:13 to BQ. . 

I am slogging away at the virtual race across Tennessee.  Falling behind as it were with my puny 30 odd miles a week.  C’est la vie.  Went for a bike ride yesterday.  Did about 26 miles in around an hour and a half. 

Almost got decapitated.  True story. 

I was rolling down this big hill towards the end of my ride.  Maybe going 20-25 miles per hour on Fuji-san, recovering from having just struggled up said hill.  There was a big construction dump truck coming up the hill in the other direction. You know the ones; used to carry great loads of dirt and rocks around from construction sites. 

Now, our roads here is New England tend to be a bit rough towards the edges and I usually try to stay out of the gutter where the roughest bits are, especially when going fast.  I had looked over my shoulder and I was the only one on the road in my direction.  I was therefor riding out towards the center edge of the lane, keeping my eye on the truck as well because for some reason people sometimes drift over into your lane and I was not going to win that argument. 

Apparently, this guy, and I’m sure it was a guy, had thrown some long lumber boards into the empty back of the dump truck.  I suppose when he started they were sticking out the back.  Those trucks are pretty bouncy and the lumber had drifted with the jostling and was sticking out of the truck sideways into oncoming traffic. 

I’m not sure it was low enough to actually get me, but at the last second I ducked under it.  I felt a bit violated but not decapitated.  I’ll take violated over decapitated most days.  As I turned around to yell some salty language it did look like he was stopping to fix this potential pedalist guillotine. 

That’s a story I’m not going to tell my wife. 

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Advice for new runners - http://runrunlive.com/so-you-started-running-during-the-stay-at-home-what-now

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Greg Milbourne

Dr. Milbourne is a licensed psychologist specializing in work with children, families, couples and adults across the lifespan. From retirement home residents coping with end of life issues to an office practice helping families, couples, adults and children, Dr. Milbourne focuses on obtaining and maintaining good physical and mental health.

“𝘐 𝘴𝘱𝘰𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘢𝘯 𝘰𝘭𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘪𝘴𝘵 𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺 𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘰𝘰𝘥 𝘸𝘩𝘺 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺𝘰𝘯𝘦’𝘴 𝘴𝘰 𝘦𝘹𝘩𝘢𝘶𝘴𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘢𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘷𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘰 𝘤𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘴. 𝘐𝘵’𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘶𝘴𝘪𝘣𝘭𝘦 𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘢𝘣𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺𝘰𝘯𝘦’𝘴 𝘢𝘣𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦.. 𝘖𝘶𝘳 𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘳𝘪𝘤𝘬𝘦𝘥 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘢 𝘰𝘧 𝘣𝘦𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘰𝘨𝘦𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘣𝘰𝘥𝘪𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘭 𝘸𝘦’𝘳𝘦 𝘯𝘰𝘵. 𝘋𝘪𝘴𝘴𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘴 𝘦𝘹𝘩𝘢𝘶𝘴𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨.. 𝘐𝘵’𝘴 𝘦𝘢𝘴𝘪𝘦𝘳 𝘣𝘦𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘪𝘯 𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳’𝘴 𝘱𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦, 𝘰𝘳 𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳’𝘴 𝘢𝘣𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦, 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘯 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘱𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳’𝘴 𝘢𝘣𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦. 𝘖𝘶𝘳 𝘣𝘰𝘥𝘪𝘦𝘴 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘤𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘴𝘰 𝘮𝘶𝘤𝘩 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘹𝘵, 𝘴𝘰 𝘮𝘶𝘤𝘩 𝘪𝘯𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯, 𝘪𝘯 𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘴, 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘮𝘦𝘦𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘯 𝘷𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘰 𝘪𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢 𝘸𝘦𝘪𝘳𝘥 𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘥𝘧𝘰𝘭𝘥𝘦𝘥. 𝘞𝘦 𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘴𝘦 𝘵𝘰𝘰 𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘵𝘭𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘤𝘢𝘯’𝘵 𝘪𝘮𝘢𝘨𝘪𝘯𝘦 𝘦𝘯𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩. 𝘛𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘭𝘦 𝘥𝘦𝘱𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘳𝘦𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘳𝘦𝘴 𝘢 𝘭𝘰𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘦𝘧𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘵.”     
--

Gregory B. Milbourne, Psy.D.
www.drmilbourne.com
610-348-7780

https://doxy.me/drmilbourne

Section two – Made up things  – http://runrunlive.com/sapiens-belief-in-made-up-things

 

Outro

Well, my friends, It is time to emerge from your cocoon and rise chrysalis to butterfly into the sweet smelling morning air that is t the RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-432.   

How are you doing?

Enough of that!

Big news is that I got my garden planted.  I already have some good sized lettuces.  I’m a modern day Cincinnatus.  I’m not really, he grew cabbages and saved the Roman state.  I grow lettuces and have saved nothing!

Actual news is that our friend Eric, who you remember from Leadville last summer, ran across Missouri over the Memorial Day weekend.  Yup, 245 miles in 3 days and collected $40k for charity.  I want to be like Eric when I grow up.  We’ll have to get him on the show to talk about it.

And if your curious about the detail behind all the training techniques I talk about, apparently my coach has written them all down in an e-book.  I will put the link in the show notes and maybe we’ll catch up with him at some point.  He knows more about this stuff than I do so it’s probably a good investment if you want to run better.

I have a question for you.  When you’re out doing a workout what’s the smallest denomination of money you’ll stop and pick up?  I founds 3 pennies on Friday and I was quite pleased with myself.  How about you?  Will you stop for the odd penny?  Or does it take folding money to break your forward progress?

I’m looking out my office (read spare bedroom now that the kids are gone) window at Ollie the Collie.  He’s sleeping in the grass in the front lawn.  He turned one year old yesterday.  I’m not sure I’ll survive until he’s 3 or 4.  He’s got more manic energy than a crack head. 

He drags me out of bed at 5:00 AM every morning and insists we go for a walk.  And his idea of a walk is running full tilt up and down the trail ripping logs out of the ground and bashing them into my legs while growling gleefully.  Absolutely nutty.

I think words are very powerful.  When we first started writing things down it was like a form of magic.  Think of spells and incantations and ‘the power of the word’.  And since everything is made up, you get to use words, magic words, to make up your own story.  This doesn’t mean telling tall tales.  It means describing a path for you and following it.

I heard this quote from poet Gregory Orr this week, where he talked about the power of words, that really struck me, and thought I’d share.

“Let’s remake the world with words.

Not frivolously, nor

To hide from what we fear,

But with a purpose.

 

Let’s, remove

“The dust of custom” so things

Shine again, each object arrayed,

In its robe of original light.

 

And then we’ll see the world,

As if for the first time.

As once we gazed at the beloved,

Who was gazing at us.” 

Humbly, I submit that my own words are but fevered scratchings at the hard shell of reality. 

Words are the power of your narrative.

Remember that as feeble as it may seem you can create your own reality and pull people into it with words and narrative.

And - I’ll see you out there.

(Outro bumper)

To take you out is Track number 11 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Dusty Laptop"

Enjoy

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4432.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 2:37pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-431 – Liz Warner – Running Adventures

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4431.mp3]
Link epi4431.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-431 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

I know, I know, I’m a few days late…  I’m going to be honest with you.  I just wasn’t motivated to produce this past weekend.  Just wasn’t.  My strategy is to spread out the production tasks throughout the week so when I get to the microphone it’s only a couple hours of work.  When I don’t do that it takes a good chunk of a day to pull it together. 

I just didn’t have the energy.  Wasn’t motivated.  Hey, I’m just a average guy like the rest of ‘em and sometimes I run out of mental energy.  Truthfully when that happens the product quality starts to suffer.  I’m guessing there’s only a few of you die-hards who even noticed I missed my publishing window! You’re waiting until your weekend run to listen anyhow, right?

So, I have recharged the batteries, grabbed the loose threads, gathered up the sundry pieces of episode 4-431, swept them into a slightly greasy bin, and will present them here for you today! 

Today we have a good show for you.  I’ve got an interview with Liz who is finishing up her  ‘run 30 marathons before her 30th birthday’ project.  I was really impressed by her sense of adventure and hopefulness.  It’s a refreshing attitude.  It’s empowering.  I enjoyed talking to her. 

And indeed, she is running to empower women in many places around the world that would seem sketchy and dangerous to most people, let alone a young woman.  I’m glad to have been able to talk with her.

In section one I’ll talk a bit about how to mix in some hard effort sessions into your stale old training.  I’ve been doing this and enjoying it.

In section two I have a piece on consumer buying trends that I’ve been thinking about. 

I left the old man and the Amazon out in the Apocalypse for now.  I have been doing some writing but haven’t gotten back to that.  If you’re new, I’m talking about an apocalyptic story series I’ve been doing for the past three episodes.  I’ve got some ideas, but I have to find the time. 

I think it would make a great serial podcast.  I would be the narrator and we’d assemble voice actors for the parts of the story.  If you’re interested in any of that reach out to me and we’ll have some fun.

And if you’re new, this is the RunRunLive podcast.  I’m up to 431 official episodes across 12 years and 4 iterations.  60ish marathons, ultramarathons, mountain bike ultras, Triathlons, a Spartan beast and sundry other fun stuff.

We talk to interesting people about endurance sports. We try to have some helpful tips for our endurance athlete friends and we muse on different things that might be interesting to think about while you’re out in the woods with your dog on a long run.

It is still the apocalypse here where I live in New England.  My family is safe and I’m still safe.  I haven’t traveled since March and I’m getting a bit of cabin fever.  It’s a bit like Groundhog Day.

I’m still training, even though all the races have been canceled.  Well, I should say all the physical races have been canceled.  Humans being humans we are creating a basket full of virtual races to run.  I have signed up for a couple. 

Currently I’m running the Great Virtual Race Across Tennessee that Gary Cantrell aka Lazarus Lake of Barkley Marathon fame is putting on.  And I’ll link to all this stuff in the show notes.  He has 18,000+ people signed up from around the world.  That’s over a million bucks in race fees.  My ultra-running friends wouldn’t stop pestering me – so I singed up.

It’s all those anarchic ultra-runners. The first day someone ran 84 miles.  We’re 13 days in and someone already finished the 1,000K.  

I’m not doing anything special to try to keep up.  I’m not sure I have the mileage right now to make 1,000 Kilos by the end of August.  I’m actually pretty sure I don’t.  I am logging my  1.2 mile morning walks with Ollie the Collie, because according to the rules it counts. 

I signed up for another one The Montauk Need to Feed 5K  which again, I’m probably not going to bust out a 5K alone for fun, but I want to support people in need.  Jerod Ward and Mollie Huddle are running that one.

You, my friends, if you’re able, should sign up for some sort of virtual event.  Even if you don’t want to do the event.  Sign up and lend your weight to the sense of community around the race and your shekels to the charity involved.  It’s an easy way to stay involved and contribute.

I’m not big on virtual races.  I’ve spent so much of the last 20 years training alone.  I don’t care about t-shirts and medals.  When I race, I care about how I feel and how I compete.  I don’t get that same juice from running by myself.  For me, that’s called ‘Wednesday’. 

 Close your eyes and join me.  It is a cold morning with the chill of a mist in the air.  The sun is just starting to creep up over a still cold lake nestled in the shoulder of a mountain.  You feel the thrill of the crowded starting line.  Nervous, fit, humans shuffle dust in the dirt road.  Murmurs and stifled laughs fill the background and there is an electric sense of energy. 

Like the opening of mass at a great cathedral a hush comes over the throng.  A runner steps forward.  She launches into the national anthem.  Starting out low and haunting like the bugles before a pitched battle and cresting high and brave like a waving flag of freedom.  A large, gathering voice lashed across a sea of energy. 

You don your hat, wipe a tear from your eye, and wait for the gun and the surge. 

And then, you see, you are out there…

On with the show.

 

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Some high Intensity - http://runrunlive.com/hard-efforts

Voices of reason – the conversation

Liz Warner

Run to Reach - http://runtoreach.com/

Tackling 30 of the world’s toughest marathons for women’s organizations around the globe Runner and philanthropist Liz Warner is taking on 30 of the world’s most challenging marathons, reaching 30 different countries before turning 30 in June 2020. Covering 786 miles, Liz is set to raise $100,000 for women-focused organizations in the final 20 countries, as well as to highlight on a global scale the efforts of each incredible organization and the strong communities, natural beauty and rich culture that each country holds.

In It For The Long Run 

Marathoner Liz Warner launched Run to Reach in early 2019, marking the beginning of a whirlwind 18-month international fundraising initiative that will see her face 30 marathons across the globe and partner with 20 local NGOs. Each one empowers women in its community to become independent, take control of their futures and fight in the face of vulnerability and discrimination. As the year’s end approaches, Liz is over two thirds into her challenge, with races taking her up active volcanoes in Guatemala, through refugee camps in Western Sahara, and across glacial lakes in Mongolia. For the last series of races, Liz will venture to far-reaching and diverse destinations, like the central highlands of Afghanistan, into the depths of small villages in Somaliland and through the rolling foothills of Mt. Everest. With every inspirational story encountered, Liz has pushed the Run to Reach mission to go even deeper. Through this project, Liz hopes to tell a story of each nation that brings to light a positive narrative in the face of challenging situations and stigmas. Race after race, it has only become clearer that the heart of each country’s promise of prosperity and equality comes from the empowerment and enablement of its women. Now with a clear focus for the last of the Run to Reach marathons, Liz hopes to drive relentlessly the success of each organization she engages with.

“I’ve participated in numerous marathons and fully believe in the potential of the running community to make an incredible impact on the planet. I am firmly convinced that our collective impact, linked together, can be exponentially more powerful and change the world we live in today. Through Run to Reach, the organizations I have chosen to work with are strong examples of empowering global women communities.”

Whether it’s transforming education facilities in local towns and villages or providing women with the resources they need to become leaders of change, I want Run to Reach to enforce change across the world.

Section two – Consumer Trends  –  http://runrunlive.com/capturing-consumer-trends-in-the-apocalypse

 

Outro

Well, my friends, you have run through the deserts, oceans and jungles of this mad world to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-431.   

Good to spend time with you.

Well, my friends, you have run through the deserts, oceans and jungles of this mad world to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-431.

Good to spend time with you. I'm glad I delayed this episode for a week.  It gave me a chance to read through the pieces and edit them.  Usually I'm a write straight through and don't worry about editing guy.

The funny thing is, whether you believe it or not, I care deeply about doing a good job.  Not just here in the podcast, but in everything I do.  It causes dissonance in me to have to rush through and do things in a slipshod way.

And that's not the way I want to tell my story.

Research has connected the dots between why affirmation works in some cases and not in others.  It has to do with whether or not you actually believe the affirmation.

What does this mean?

It means the story you tell about yourself is important. It also means the way you tell it is very important.  And it means you must believe that story.

You can repeat whatever positive mantra you want over and over while gazing at yourself in the mirror, but it won’t improve your performance or your life unless you believe it.  You can’t trick yourself into believing.

Affirmation, whether internal or external works when it is grounded in what we believe to be our true selves.

We all know what our strengths are.  Those are the bedrock of our beliefs.

When you can understand and articulate what your strengths are it gives you an anchor.  Rooted to this anchor you can clear your way through the noise of inputs and outputs and set a path that is true to you.

Take a moment of quiet today and write down what you are proud of, what you are good at, and what you are passionate about.

Then use that statement of strength to tell your story.  Not just to yourself, but to everyone else.

Thanks for listening.

Chris,

And - I’ll see you out there.

(Outro bumper)

To take you out is Track number 10 from Brian Sheff The Rock Opera by The Nays - Called "Searching for so Long"

Enjoy

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4431.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 9:19pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-430 – Amanda Conditioning Versus Form for Injury Prevention

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4430.mp3]
Link epi4430.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-430 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

Here we are, still in the apocalypse.  Hope everyone is doing ok. I’m cycling between busyness, weirdness, sadness and gratitude. How are you doing? 

This week was Patriot’s Day and would have been the Boston Marathon.  Weather was good for it too.  My buddies went out Sunday and ran a bit of the course, but I demurred.  I took Ollie and did a 17ish mile long trail loop around my house.  I just felt like I needed that.  Took me about 3 hours.  Ollie was exhausted and slept all day Monday. 

Before you call the SPCA on me, I stay on the trails with him and he’s only got to keep up with my casual trial pace – so other than the 3 hours it’s a low effort affair for him – literally a walk in the woods.  

He sleeps most days while I’m working. I’ve been getting him out on base building runs about 3 days a week and I take him with me.  These are all in the trails behind my house and we typically do 7ish miles or 1:20ish and that takes the edge off of both of us for a day. 

On the days when I’m not running, I get up early and take him for a walk of the 1 mile loop in the woods.  He really enjoys this, and it gives him a chance to vent some energy.  He’s going to go nuts when I start traveling again.

Today we chat with Amanda about injury diagnosis and prevention.  She’s got an interesting take on how runners should focus on strengthening their core primarily to run better. 

In Section one I’ll give you a quick primer on how to build your own core routine.  It’s not rocket science.  Or, if you prefer an amusing malaphor,  ‘It’s not rocket surgery…’ 

In section two, by popular demand we’ll check in on our apocalypse friends who we left stuck on a barn roof.  I have to thank you folks for forcing me to keep the story going.  I’m very good at 1500 word pictures.  Not so practiced at stringing them together into cohesive stories. 

Here’s what I plan to do.  I’m going to take this storyline out of the RunRunLive podcast and move it to another place.  Maybe I’ll set up a podcast feed for it.  But, mostly I just want to figure out what the bigger narrative is and see if I can pursue that. 

Thanks for the help and stay tuned for details.

Today would have been the Groton Road Race.  We had potentially postponed it to the fall, but we met this week and decided to cancel until next year.  It’s the right thing to do. 

I went out with Frank and Brian and we ran the old 10k course, then ran the regular 10k course, for the most part. 

The word ‘Apocalypse’ is a Greek word that apart from our current usage originally meant revelation, uncovering, and discovery.  And I think that’s a lesson for us here.  As cheesy as it sounds this is an opportunity for you and I to take a deep breath, to uncover and discover, to realign with our families and ourselves. 

Take it easy on yourselves though.  I’m finding myself feeling guilty for not getting more done.  There is no reason for that.  Celebrate your wins.  There’s always going to be an infinite number of things you don’t get done.  Do the best you can.  Make progress.  You can’t achieve perfection.  Just make progress. 

Do the best you can. 

As we settle into this change, remember it takes 20+ days to burn in a new habit.  What better questions can you be asking?  What better things can you be doing?  What small habits of kindess, empathy and thoughtfulness can you use this episode of discovery to begin or learn?

We’re all stuck on our roofs with a hungry lion prowling, aren’t we?

On with the show.

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Core - http://runrunlive.com/deeper-dive-into-core-and-strength-routines

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Amanda Regnier

http://runningwithregnier.com/

Hi Chris,

Thank you very much for having me on your podcast yesterday - it was fun!  As requested, I have attached a photo of myself.  In terms of a bio:

I am a Calgary based strength and conditioning coach, with a specialization in endurance running.  Although I have competed at a national and international level in triathlon, I am not a natural athlete.  Being naturally un-athletic has inspired me to take a deep dive into the science behind endurance performance, to coach myself and my athletes to reach their full potential.  As new science becomes available, I like to share this through various platforms such as my website runningwithregnier.com in the "Running Science" section, social media (@RUNNINGWITHREGNIER on instagram), live presentations in the community and my podcast "Performance Running Podcast" available on iTunes and Spotify.

Amanda Regnier

MSc. Strength and Conditioning, C.S.C.S

Endurance Performance Specalist/ Coach

Section two – After the Apocalypse #4  –  http://runrunlive.com/the-shot

 

Outro

Well, my friends, you have fixed your core strength and your knee feels better and you have limped to the end of another RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-430. 

I’ve got nothing on the calendar race-wise now, which I find utterly disturbing.  I’ve still got my eye on a July race.  I think the next 2-3 weeks will resolve some things.   I wouldn’t be surprised if they canceled the Boston race or changed it to be just the elites. 

My nutrition project is going fairly well.  I’m cooking more and I’m off the beer and bread.  I haven’t dropped a ton of weight but I’m feeling healthier. I’m about 10 pounds lighter.  I’m off the beer.  I have good energy and no real aches or pains. 

I’ll give you a couple of simple healthy cooking tips, although I have no right to do so.  I have a big cast iron skillet that I use.  The company that makes those, by the way is Lodge and they are in Tennessee a couple miles from Tim’s house.   It is great for simple, 1-pot meals.  You can take any vegetable.  Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage and make a nice, filling sauté. 

First, heat that pan up pretty high, put a couple tablespoons of olive oil in, dice up a couple garlic cloves and some onion.  Cook those, while stirring until they turn translucent. Will make your house smell great. 

Throw your veggies in cover for a couple minutes.  Pour in a cup of broth, shake on some kosher salt, add a couple shots of soy sauce and you’ve got the same veggies you would get from a Chinese restaurant in the US.  You can even eat them with rice. 

I’ll give you another, even simpler, cooking hack.  Spices.  Yep.  You can use the same basic spices to make anything taste better.  It doesn’t matter whether you’re making.  If you’ve got any friends from southern Asia have them spice shop for you. 

Let’s say you have chicken, doesn’t matter if it’s wings or breasts or whatever.  Take a teaspoon of the good salt, a teaspoon of pepper, a teaspoon of paprika and, let’s say some cumin.  It doesn’t’ matter, you will figure out the ratios, the spices and the amounts that fit your pallet.  I tend to go  heavy on the cayenne pepper. 

Take all these spices and combine them. If you happen to have a mortar and pestle, that’s the perfect tool to crush them all together.   Did you know the mortar and pestle is one of the oldest human tools?  Goes all the way back to the stone age. 

Mortar comes from the Latin mortarium and is a receptacle for pounding.   Same word gives you the mortar you put on bricks and the mortar board you wear to graduation, if graduation wasn’t canceled.

Pestle, uninterestingly, comes from the Latin pistilium, and simply means a tool for pounding. And unfortunately has nothing whatsoever to do with ‘pistil’ which is the reproductive organ of a plant, nor any of the P-words we use for reproductive organs.  Pestle isn’t even related to ‘pistol’, even though I think it should be, ‘pistol’, they think originated from the name of a town in Italy where they apparently made pistols in medieval times. 

With all the several thousand bags of crap my wife has carted home from the Christmas Tree shop over the years, ironically I don’t own a pestle, or a mortar.  So I used a small bowl and the head off a small wooden hammer that I brought back from a vacation to Ocean City any years ago and was originally used to  violate soft shelled crabs. 

Soft shelled crabs, by the way, are typically very spicy. 

You grind your chosen spices together. 

Put your chicken or whatever else it is you want to spice into a bowl or bag.  Pour in a glug of olive oil.  Throw in your ground spices.  Mix thoroughly.  Bake in the oven. 

That’s it. Sweet tasty food without any fattening cheese sauce from a bottle that any dummy with a pestle can make.

Do you feel more capable of facing the apocalypse now? 

OK then,  I’ll see you out there.

(Outro bumper)

You’re not getting off that easy. There are 20 tracks on Brian Scheff, the Rock Opera by The Nays.  Here’s Number 9 – Called Casino.  All music can be found at their website TheNays.com

 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4430.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 5:12pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-428 – Talking Poop with Rachel

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4429.mp3]
Link epi4429.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-429 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

How’s everyone doing?  I’m really busy.  I’m just about 4-months into my new job and I’m at that point where I’m expected to be production but still don’t really know anything.  There will be some friction for me as I get up to speed.  But, hey, I’m lucky to have a job, right? 

Today we have a fun show for you.  Rachel, my long-term nutrition coach, and I talk about poop.  She wanted to talk about poop.  Who am I to argue?  My inner 9-year-old enjoyed it immensely.  I wasn’t sure how it would come out, so to speak, but my editor in Moscow, Dimitri, said he enjoyed it.  Apparently he survived his holiday, which is a good thing.

I finished my reading of the Princess Bride into audio / video last night.  You’ll find a post with all the recordings on my website if you’re interested or your kids are.  It’s an interesting thing.  I had never read the book before.  I now appreciate the movie even more.

Most of the time when you hear that they have one of your favorite books into a movie you know that they are going to screw it up.  Most of the time they do.  But, in this case, I think the movie was actually better than the book. 

The movie grabbed all of the good parts of the book, lifting dialog verbatim.  It really does the story justice while treading lightly around the story within a story about a story metaphor that the author seems to delight so much in the book.   There are whole extra chapters in the book that add no value, and I skipped. 

The movie does a great job with casting form the vacuous princess to Andre the Giant as Fezzik.  Great choices.  The movie walks that line between story and parody adroitly. 

I’ll have to go back and watch it again. Maybe it’s on Netflix or Prime.  But, you know the rule, “If you really want to watch it, it isn’t on Netflix.  It took me 19 sessions of 15-30 minutes each to get through the book.  Call that about 8 hours.  Certainly you have eight hours to read to your kids in a month and build some lasting memories?

My training is going fine, but we’ll talk more about that later. 

In section one we’ll talk about a new way to think about hills.  In section two, even though I was ready to abandon the old man to the apocalypse, I will continue that story, after much prodding from all of you. 

I’m well and my family is well.  I was getting quite plump when Rachel and I spoke.  I hadn’t planned on it, but was inspired by our conversation to take the reigns back in had on my nutrition.  I got to the point where it I was doing stuff I’d never do, like eating two big servings of ice cream or drinking beer every night.  I had a noticeable roll growing around my middle and my clothes were starting to complain.  So I’m a week in and have dropped 5 pounds and feel better. 

I’m working with Rachel. The best thing she does for me is to give me dinner recipes.  I’ve been cooking almost every night.  It’s kinda fun.  I usually post a picture on social media if you want to play along.

How’s Ollie Wollie? He’s a tank.  I was going to write a children’s book series about him.  You know, “Ollie Wollie the Collie knocks little Billie down and bites him til he bleeds…”

“Ollie Wollie the Collie rolls in Horse poop, eats it and throws up in little Billie’s bed…”

“Ollie Wollie the Collie shreds Billie’s homework, for real…”

On with the show…

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Hills again - http://runrunlive.com/hills-again

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Rachel Shuck

https://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/poo-digestive-health-101/

Rachel Shuck is a board certified nutrition coach with a passion for running and all things fitness. She specializes in coaching endurance athletes through her company nextlevelnutrition.fitness, additionally she teaches nutrition at the local college while pursuing her doctorate in clinical nutrition. Rachel is certified with the International Sports Science Association and the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Association as well. Her personal journey began with running 5k’s and being at the back of the pack, to running marathons and becoming a two-time Boston Qualifier. Along her decade long path of coaching runners she found a true passion for teaching people proper nutrition to fuel for optimal performance. Rachel’s articles and videos have been featured in Mind Body Green, Personal Growth, and  the Livestrong website, as well as local news shows covering health and fitness.

 

Section two – After the Apocalypse #3  – http://runrunlive.com/lions-and-tigers-and-emus-oh-my

 

Outro

Well, my friends, when ya gotta go, ya gotta go – to the  through the end another RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-429. 

Well, the woods behind my house continue to be a superhighway.  I feel a bit violated.  Last week I looked out the window and there was a Shetland pony in my back yard.  Just passin though… My wife just looked out and a woman was walking through our back yard. 

As Ollie and I left the trailhead in my yard Friday afternoon an official type gentleman pointed at Ollie and said, “New town law all dogs have to be on leash.”  The trees are pinned with notices.  I thanked him and we kept going the 20 feet to my driveway.  Maybe this is my Thoreau moment for a little civil disobedience?

Buddy and I made these trails.  I feel as if I’ve lost something. 

My race in June got canceled.  That’s it.  Nothing to train for except Boston in September.  Boston in September means you’ll be hitting the high-volume weeks of your cycle in August when it’s very hot and humid.  Maybe it’s time to take up golf.

I did see there’s another, similar race to the tunnel marathon in Washington in July.  Maybe I’ll run that instead.  Same mildly downhill course on a dirt road.  My kind of course. 

I’m sure you are all fighting and surviving and working with the current situation.  It’s odd.  It’s scary.  I’m also sure you’ve seen the advice. 

Primarily the advice you need is to take care of yourselves.  Especially take care of your mental health.  Be choosey about what you let into your brain.  Lay off the negative social media and the news.  Your brain is very much a programmable computer and what you allow in influences what you get out.  Don’t load it down with fear and anxiety.  Stand guard.  Be mindful.

Remember the power of now.  Don’t get lost in worrying about things that could happen or might happen.  You can’t control that.  Focus on now.  What do you have now?  What can you do now?  Be mindful.  Make sure you’re telling the right stories.

I watch the local network news occasionally.  I had an odd thought tonight.  As they were reading out the body counts I was reminded of how they used to read out the body counts on the nightly news during the Vietnam war.  Yes, I’m that old, I was a kid at the time.  It was like the scores to a game.  Every night.  The news and the nation were addicted to those numbers and lost sight of so much else. 

Not our finest hour.

So be careful with what you let into your mind.  Focus on now.  Do what you can and take care of yourself.

And I’ll see you out there.

(Outro bumper)

Track  #6 from Brian Scheff, the Rock Opera by The Nays, She’s a lonely girl, Frank told me last weekend when he, Brian and I were out on a social distance run that all these songs are available on iTunes.  So go buy a couple, music will keep you sane in the apocalypse.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4429.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 1:07pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-428 – Matt Fitzgerald – Training with the Pro’s

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4428.mp3]
Link epi4428.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-428 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   So here we are in the apocalypse.  How’s everyone doing?  These are interesting times.  That’s a trick of modern English.  Whenever we don’t want to say ‘bad’ we say ‘interesting’ like somehow we are just observers in the soup?

Took me until today to get this show out.  Not because I don’t have time.  Not because I don’t have ideas and content. Not because I have technical issues.  No, just lacked basic motivation over the last couple days.  Been watching low quality TV, eating poorly, playing some my online zombie game…you know, super adult and productive!

It’s ok to take a day or two off but don’t let these doldrums turn into patterns or new habits.  Now is a good time to start new habits.  An excellent way to kick out of a malaise is to do a fixed program – like a 10-day meditation challenge or a 20-day plank challenge.  Or a daily journaling challenge.

I’ve kicked off a couple new projects this week.  First is I’m reading the Princess Bride into audio for 20-30 minutes every day and posting it on my web site.  I figured if I could read to my kids when they were young, I can read to everyone’s kids.  You can find the current nine reading sessions on my website under Story Time. 

I also got asked by some folks to participate in a group story telling event for the Chicago Area Running Association.  That’ll be a live Zoom meeting Wednesday night of this week.

My work is super busy.  My training stepped back to just some easy runs and one crazy HIT workout this week. These HIT – High Intensity Training workouts are something you can do from your house.  You can look them up online or just make them up.  The basic form is a short sprint followed by some high-intensity exercises. 

For example; go out your front door and sprint 100M out and back, then do 10 fast pushups, 10 fast crunches, 5 pullups then sprint again, 3 more exercises, sprint – you will be gasping like a fish out of water.  Definitely a change in pace for me who’s been doing mostly easy trail runs. 

The entire world is marching through my woods these days as well.  I know they’re bored, but I feel a bit violated.  Buddy and I cut those trails 20 years ago.  Now I’m shoulder to shoulder with the hoi polloi in my happy place.  I have to go out at dawn if I want some peace. 

Today we have a great interview with old friend and running journalist Matt Fitzgerald who is publishing a new book this month called Running the Dream where he executes all of our adult fantasies and lives and trains as a professional with a professional team for a race.  It’s a great read and gets my thumbs up.

In section I’ll give you a the results of a Q&A I did on Facebook which may or may not be useful.  And is section two a follow-up apocalypse story from the same universe I created last episode.  Having fun with this.  Maybe this is the book I was looking for? 

Had a nice outing with Ollie on Friday night.  Coach gave me a day off on Saturday and I was super sore from that HIT workout on Thursday so I figured I could go out late. 

The day got away from me from the start.  The dog woke up early, like 5:30 and after I let him out to pee, I laid down on the couch.  Ollie climbed up on the back of the couch and fell asleep sort of sitting on me.  Next thing I know it’s 7:30. Missed my 7:00 AM call. 

Took Ollie for a walk and went to work on the back to back calls and deadlines feeling unmotivated.  But, I dropped that 2-hour run on my calendar for 6:30 PM.  I didn’t even come close to completing everything that was due or catching up.  But, at 6:30 I grabbed my new headlamp and Ollie and headed into the woods.

Technically the sun set at 7:00.  But, as a trail runner you start to understand the relationship between sunset, weather and having enough light to see.  It was a clear and beautiful day.  Without cloud cover you get another 30 minutes or so of residual light after the sun sets. 

Ollie and I set out into the woods.  The melt is on now and there’s plenty of mud to deal with.  There’s a spot out on the trail about 3 miles out where we run along the edge of the pond.  There’s the remnants of a cottage and a break in the bushes where their beach used to be.  I set my sites on getting to this spot before the sun was totally gone to get a photo.

I’ve taken to stopping here and taking the same photo from the same place to mark the passing of the days and seasons.  I stand on the same stone and frame the same tree and get the same photo.  I wasn’t sure this one would come out.  The sun had set 10-15 minutes before.  But it came out beautifully. 

I arrived right at that point when you have to switch the headlamp on.  It’s a hauntingly beautiful shot.  It’s a shot in the moment. 

That peaceful glow of a setting sun.  That slight ripple from the paddling of unseen ducks in the shadow. The water black and smooth.  The tree starkly silhouetted against it all.  That moment of peace and beauty was there whether or not the work got done.  That beauty was there whether or not the apocalypse raged. 

That beauty and peace is still there.  I just wasn’t looking for it.  What are you focused on?  Your beauty and peace is still there.  Everything else is just made up.  Own your focus.

On with the show!

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Ask me a question about running - http://runrunlive.com/ask-me-a-question-about-running

Voices of reason – the conversation

Matt Fitzgerald

Hi Chris,

Cover image attached. It's a 3D conversion. I don't seem to have a straight front cover image, but Jessica can supply that, along with the jacket copy.

Here's a link to the book page on the publisher's website (which, I'm just now seeing, does NOT have the correct jacket copy!)

https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Running-the-Dream/Matt-Fitzgerald/9781643135144 

Running the Dream | Book by Matt Fitzgerald | Official Publisher Page | Simon & Schuster

Matt Fitzgerald is an acclaimed endurance sports and nutrition writer and certified sports nutritionist. His most recent book, Iron War, was long-listed for the 2012 William Hill Sports Book of the Year, and he is the author of the best-selling Racing Weight.Fitzgerald is a columnist on Competitor.com and Active.com, and has contributed to Bicycling, Men’s Health, Triathlete, Men’s Journal ...

www.simonandschuster.com

And here's a link to my website (which does):

https://mattfitzgerald.org

Let me know if you need anything else. Thanks!

Matt Fitzgerald
Author of Life Is a Marathon

 

Section two – After the Apocalypse #2  – http://runrunlive.com/the-dig

Outro

Well, my friends, another week, another episode and another opportunity.  You have run like a pro through the end of yet another RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-428 done and down. 

Go get Matt’s book – I think you’ll like it. 

By the way, shout out and thanks to Carlos the Jackal for doing the edit on this interview.  My normal editor Dimitri from Moscow was on holiday.  Hope he’s not on a cruise. 

I’ve started a new hashtag - #longsongsfortheapocalypse – these are all those great 10 minute plus jams that I listen to in the background while I’m writing.  You can find them on my facebook feed.

Well, I’m still training.  My A race in June hasn’t gotten cancelled yet.  I was going to cobble this race trip together with a Vancouver vacation with my wife – but she is making noises like there’s no way she’s getting on an airplane with me in June.  I haven’t made my travel plans yet.  Maybe this will become one of those in-and-out guerilla marathon tries that my races always seem to devolve into.

My friend running buddy Frank, yes the drummer for the Nays, is making noises like he might come.  He was training for Vermont and that got pushed. 

It’s going to be a full fall with all the races moving.  It will be interesting. You’ll have twice as many races with the same number of runners. This may be the straw that breaks the camel’s back for a lot of races.  We’ll see some consolidation. 

We’ll see that same consolidation and aggregation across industries.  The small and fragile will get washed out and the big and strong will invest and get bigger. It’s the cycle of life, I guess.  The thing is this type of forest clearing creates the next wave of growth.  When businesses see a contraction like this it creates thousands of entrepreneurs for the next cycle.

Ollie is being Ollie.  He’s a nut.  He’s so strong.  We’re working it out.  He’s been good interacting with all the new people on the trails.  He doesn’t attack them. He immediately defaults to submissive with other dogs.  That’s good because I don’t’ think I have the upper body strength to run with him on leash all the time.

Sorry for getting this one out a little late.  I appreciate you.  I am quite thankful to have you in my life even if it’s a one-way relationship.  I’ve had a couple good interactions these last couple weeks that let me know people are out on the other end and that helps, it really does, so thank you. 

Let me know if there is anything I can do for you.  Let me know if you want to collaborate on a project.  Let me know if I’m traveling to your town and you want to grab a coffee.  These things are all still there for us.  The beauty is still there.  The peace is still there.

Close your eyes now.  Take a deep slow breath through your nose.  Inhales kindness and empathy. Exhale through your mouth and give that kindness and empathy back to the universe.  Do that a few times.  Let yourself relax.

We’re going to be ok. 

Whatever happens, we can handle it.

We’ll see you out there.

 (Outro bumper)

Track  #6 from Brian Scheff, the Rock Opera by The Nays, She’s a lonely girl, Frank told me last weekend when he, Brian and I were out on a social distance run that all these songs are available on iTunes.  So go buy a couple, music will keep you sane in the apocalypse.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4428.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 4:24pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-427 – Shoshana and Adam – Veggies Saved my Life!

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4427.mp3]
Link epi4427.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-427 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   Here we are at the center of a pandemic!  Most days I’d be sitting in my home office writing, but with the apocalypse in full swing I figure my time would be better spent … umm… sitting in my home office writing?

I suppose I should make an effort to paint the context for you because we may need to look back on this episode, listen and think.    

So, my future listeners, it is the day before the ides of March 2020.  We are in the grips of the corona virus.  This week they cancelled all major sports seasons, and postponed the Boston Marathon, for the first time in 124 years, until the fall.  

Americans are all working from home as most businesses have closed.  There has been a run on toilet paper and bottled water for some reason.   Does it affect me?  I suppose we’ll see.  I started working for a big company a couple months ago and that is looking like a fairly prescient move. 

I was down in Dallas two weeks ago after we last spoke.  I was at a conference in Atlanta this week.  I was supposed to be out in Grand Rapids at a client next week but that got canceled.  I can work virtually, so it’s not a game ender. 

After we last spoke, I entered into the hard part of my training for Boston.  This week was going to be a monster, with a big miles and three killer workouts.  But, after they rescheduled the marathon I’m backing off and switching back to base-building. 

Today we speak with Adam and Shoshana Chaim about how a vegan diet saved Adam’s life.  I know we’ve covered this topic before, but I had a request to specifically explore how to manage a vegan diet while competing at a high level. 

In section one I’m going to talk about sleep and the impact of not getting enough or getting too much.

In section two, just because it felt right, I wrote an apocalypse story for you.  I love the apocalypse genre.  I don’t know why. It seems like the ultimate escapism, I guess.

Before my racing plans got changed I woke up to a fairly sever tempo workout in Atlanta Tuesday morning.   Again, with Boston 4 weeks away (at the time) this was the final push.  Coach gave me an 8 X 7 tempo work out.  So, warm up, run 7 minutes hard, 2 minute recover, repeat 8 times.  Ironically at my current pace and fitness that’s almost perfectly a mile repeat.

I knew I was going to be in Atlanta.  Unless you find a track, it is hard to find a good place to do mile repeats in Atlanta.  I was staying north of the city in Roswell because all the hotels were sold out down in the city where the conference was.   

I am fairly familiar with this workout, and have run it in Atlanta before and I have a strategy.   While the roads around Atlanta are a nightmare for running on, the parking lots are good, especially early in the morning.  I zoomed in on Google maps around the hotel and found some beautiful giant parking lots less than a mile away. 

It turns out, without knowing this, I had positioned myself across the street from the new Atlanta Braves stadium. 

I rolled out of bed early and ran over to where I knew the parking lot was.  It was raining but a warm 50ish degrees. The sun wasn’t up.  I had to cross the highway but this was ok because around the stadium the sidewalks and walkways are designed for stadium traffic and are 15 foot wide. 

On the Google maps the parking lot looked flat, but in reality it was a bit of a saddle shape.  If I stuck to the outside it was about a 1/4 mile on each side with the center being the high spot in the saddle and maybe 50 feet of drop to the edges. 

I hit the old lap button and got to it.  Holding a pretty good pace up and down the inclines getting to practice my form.  It was a struggle in the rain, in my jetlag, in the dark up and down the long lanes. I pushed hard and worked my form and settled into the aching discomfort of tempo.

That’s how you do it.

This parking lot, as it turns out, was the marshalling area for the local construction worker crews.  As I ground out my repeats they loaded and unloaded into pickups and vans and trailers with their orange vests and hard hats.  I didn’t pay them much attention, but it was a nice distraction from my suffering.  If we crossed paths I’d nod as I pushed by. 

I wonder what they were thinking of this old guy pushing up and down the parking lot in the early morning rain. 

I got to thinking about how those are the types of workouts that make you strong.  Those are the types of workouts that separate the normal from the exceptional. 

I used the Google maps to find a trail head close to the hotel and followed it down to the Chattahoochee River the next day.   Legs were tired but I was grateful to find the river trail. 

I know you all have worries today.  This is your opportunity to practice leadership.  Us old ones have been through this before.  The sun has always risen the day after one of these crises.  The world has yet to come to an end.  The things you have that matter, you still have, no one can take those from you. 

This is your opportunity to lead with a positivity that looks calmly to the future, that brings hope, that inspires.  Be that leader today.  People are watching you.  Be the calming presence.  Be the positive spark.  Be the hope that they are looking for.

On with the show!

 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Sleep - http://runrunlive.com/the-impact-of-sleep

Voices of reason – the conversation

Shoshana and Adam Chaim

https://www.planttrainers.com/

  info@planttrainers.com

Welcome! I’m Shoshana Chaim and, when I was pregnant with my second child, my husband developed a rare tumor on his kidney. Not long after, my son showed signs of severe eczema and I experienced PTSD that left me missing quality time with my kids for way too long. After deciding that medication and surgery to temporarily solve these problems wasn’t an option, I found plant-based living and completely overhauled our lifestyle one day at a time. Now, as a Family Health and Wellness Coach, I work one-on-one with busy parents and families to alleviate the stress in life that’s caused by poor diet, unhealthy lifestyle, and chronic illness. With an emphasis on plant-based nutrition and action steps that are customized to each family’s needs, I’m on a mission to heal people from the inside out, so that they can finally stop solely surviving and start thriving again.

The Full Story

When I met my husband, we were young gym rats thinking we ate healthy enough. But when I found out I was four weeks pregnant with my second child and that my husband, Adam, had a rare tumor on his kidney, everything changed. We were told that the chances of him dying before the age of 40 were quite high. After doctor visit upon doctor visit, the only solution we were given was to prepare for surgery and genetic testing.

 We were told to cross our fingers and I thought I had to prepare for the worst.

How was I going to raise one child, never mind two, on my own?

How could I lose the love of my life?

How was I going to bring a baby into the world and her father not be standing there?

What did we do to deserve this?

Were we not good enough or nice enough people?

I feared the worst, but those fears coming true weren’t an option for our family. Surgery wasn’t an option – there had to be a better, less invasive way that wouldn’t also result in the removal of his kidney.

After a ton of research, Adam decided to change his diet. He realized that a plant-based diet allows the body to heal and restore, and found these incredible stories where people have cured cancer and reversed heart disease…all based on the food they were eating.

Adam was sold immediately, but I, on the other hand, wasn’t ready. I was a new mom, just learning how to cook and meal plan, and now my husband didn’t want to eat meat or cheese and I didn’t understand why. Because even though we just went through the trauma of Adam’s diagnosis, I still thought it would never happen to me. I thought my kids would never be without me. I figured that if I just did everything else right, then I could still hold on to some of those foods that I loved.

But when I experienced PTSD after Adam’s diagnosis, I realized how much a 100% nutrient dense plant-based diet allows me to feel my very best. I saw the full connection between the way I ate and the way I felt. A lot of hard work, support from those I love, and my diet gave me the tools I needed to come of medication and feel the best I’d felt in years.

All in all, it took me about six months to jump on board and adopt a fully plant-based diet and lifestyle that worked for me. I was comfortable with my grocery bills (that actually ended up lower!), I knew what and how to supplement the few nutrients I needed, and I knew what kind of meals I should cook for me and my family.

In those 6 months, I realized that if we don’t take care of ourselves first, then we can’t take of anyone else later. That life is fragile and family is irreplaceable. I learned that although we cannot prevent every scary thing from happening to our families, we can prevent 80% of chronic diseases by simply changing our diet and lifestyle.

After watching this plant-based lifestyle shrink Adam’s tumor, clear our son’s eczema, take a client off insulin, stabilize my PTSD, and do so much more, I’m now on a mission to heal families from the inside out. I want to keep as many children as possible from losing time with a parent due to illness, immobility, or worse. I want to prevent as many parents as possible from having to raise a child alone. And most of all, I want to allow our children to grow up without the same dietary diseases as previous generations. Too much time, money and effort is spent trying to fight off or reverse disease that we could have prevented.

If you feel as if this is your last chance…If you’ve done paleo, and weight watchers, and all the diets you can think of…If you realize that we’re not immortal and that our lifestyle affects the people closest to us…

Then, welcome. You don’t have to think about leaving your children behind anymore.

I know firsthand that the after effects of illness create a ripple effect in your family. Financially, emotionally, physically – the way we eat and live have a greater effect than we can even imagine. Every single thing we put into our mouths has either a positive or negative consequence on not only our health but also the freedom to do what we please, and not only for ourselves but also for everyone who touches our lives. When you live a healthy lifestyle, with an emphasis on plant-based nutrition, your body is given a chance to heal and thrive.

Through one-on-one coaching and a plant-based healthy lifestyle, it’s possible to alleviate the stress in life caused by poor diet, unhealthy lifestyle, and chronic illness.

With an emphasis on plant-based nutrition and action steps that are customized to each individual’s or family’s needs, I’m on a mission to heal you from the inside out, so that you can finally stop solely surviving and start thriving again.

I’d love to invite you to a complimentary 45 minute call to get to know you and hear about where you are in your health journey. On this call, you get clear on what you want to create for your or your family’s health, your life and what’s been holding you back from reaching your goals. And you’ll leave with some actionable next steps too! To take advantage of this offer just click here.  https://calendly.com/planttrainers/15min/06-26-2018

https://www.planttrainers.com/blog/

 

Section two – After the Apocalypse  – http://runrunlive.com/after-the-apocalypse

Outro

Well, my friends, we have stayed calm and leaned on our inherent strength, and nibbled a bit of kale through the end of another RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-427 done and down. 

 What now?  Well it’s all a bit up in the air.  Which is ok with me.  My ‘A’ race wasn’t Boston.  My ‘A’ race was and still is the Tunnel Marathon in June.  I think we’ll be through the current headwinds by then. 

I’ll drop my training back into base building and strength for a month or so before ramping up for that. 

That Grand Canyon run is, unfortunately, probably not going to happen now that Boston is dropped squarely in the same time slot. 

We postponed the Groton Road race as well. 

It’s really a bit of a relief.  With the new job I was starting to stress out a bit with all that spring-time stuff that happens in this spring-time stuff season.  Now we’ve potentially got the space to catch up on some other things that might have been crowded out otherwise.

Ollie the Collie is doing great.  He was getting a bit crazy because my training and travel crowded out his running time.  Now, I can get back to that as well.   He’s still a maniac. 

I joked this week that we should have named him Satan.   He’s like a gremlin in the house.  A partial list of things he’s eaten…Socks, shoes, underwear, towels, reading glasses, all the channel changers, print cartridges, hats, gloves,  and napkins.  If you walk around my house, you’ll find socks and shoes perched on the high places – tenuously out of harms way.

And he’s a digger.  My yard looks like a scene from the movie ‘Holes’.  He literally sits on my head if I try to watch TV.  His favorite thing is to stick his tongue in your mouth when you’re not looking.  That and having any part of you in his jaws.

My current strategy is to survive until he gets a bit older, then try again to train him.  He’ll be an asset in the apocalypse though. 

Those of you who have been with me for a few years will know that I was born for the zombie apocalypse.  And here we are!  My time has come!

Hope you enjoyed the interview and the story telling today. 

Don’t forget to be a leader.  The world needs you.  This is that time when they will say – ‘Remember that time everyone else freaked out and Bob was the rock we could all rely on?” 

It’s your moment Bob.  Make us proud. 

We’ll see you out there.

 (Outro bumper)

Track  #5 from Brian Scheff, the Rock Opera by The Nays, A real Corker! “I want to know”, Tunes for the apocalypse my friends. 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4427.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:14pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-426 – Steve Pero and the Rim to Rim to Rim

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4426.mp3]
Link epi4426.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-426 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   Here we are celebrating a leap year February.  That means you and I get an extra day to do the things we love! 

Good stuff, right?

Today we have a good show for you.  I corralled one of my local ultra-running friends Steve to give me some coaching on running the Rim-to-Rim in the Grand Canyon.  

Coincidently, if you want some more around the history of running the Grand Canyon, you can check out a series that Davey Crockett did on the Ultra-running History Podcast all about the Grand Canyon and the Rim to Rim runners of the last 100 years. 

I went to the Grand Canyon for the first time int 2015 and I was so impressed that I returned in 2016 and ran down to Phantom Ranch and back with my daughter.  I’m planning on going back in September of this year and doing a 2-day Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim.  Meaning, we are going to run south to north on day one, stay over on the north side then come back on day 2. 

If that sounds like fun to you, you are more than welcome to join.  You’ll have to manage your own logistics.  Effort-wise it’s the equivalent of a hilly 50K I’d say, unless the weather goes sideways. 

In section one we will try to answer the question of at what age do the wheels fall off your athletic pursuits?  In section two we’ll talk about sticks. 

On the topic of aging there are a number of people trying to figure out why we can’t all live to 150 or even 200 years old.  Of course there have probably always been these people, but the modern ones are trying to leverage science. 

I was listening to one of these and it turns out they are very big on cold therapy, i.e. plunging yourself into cold water as a way to shock your body into a positive stress response.  Meaning, these things that stress us shake our genomes out of their comfortable slumber and get them awake and cracking, pushing out good youthful stuff that makes us stronger. 

And you laughed at me with my ice baths. 

Since we last talked I have transitioned into some more intense, race specific training for Boston.  Last weekend coach started me on some hill repeats.   I was pretty proud of myself getting up Friday morning with the sunrise and 10 degrees and knocking them out!  The sun is coming up early enough now to run in the morning. 

This is another one of those old-guy tricks.  Instead of doing speedwork on the track you do tempo on the hill.  It has the same positive effect on your footspeed, turnover, form and strength without as much pounding. 

Last Sunday I did a 2:30 with surges and a fast finish.  Tomorrow I’ll do 2:45. This will get me close to 30k.   Well into the mid 40’s of miles per week. 

I still get out with Ollie the Collie in the woods for some of my mid-week runs.  He is still a maniac.  He has added to his annoying habit of lying in wait on the trail and pouncing on me.  He likes to chose good ground to do this from.  Like when I’m struggling up a muddy knoll or trying to navigate a slippery rock bridge over a stream.

He’ll lie in a crouch and spring at me.  If I’m not paying attention I may receive essentially a 45 pound punch to the family jewels. 

His new trick is right after this assault he’ll look around for the nearest stick to grab and run with it, growling.  The challenge with this is sometimes he grabs small sticks and sometimes he grabs 6-foot long branches. He then runs in and around me with his payload, joyously growling and swinging his bit of tree. 

Try as I may, inevitable he trips me and I get familiar with the frozen or muddy ground.  On time last week he literally stuck a branch between my legs as I was running, like when the Italian rider stuck the rod into the spokes of Dave’s bike in the movie ‘Breaking Away’

What am I talking about?  Well it’s this coming of age movie from 1979 about a townie kid in Indiana who dreams of riding with the Europeans.  It has a great supporting cast with a young Dennis Quaid and Daniel Stern from the Home Alone franchise and the best use of Rossini’s Barber of Seville ever.

In this pivotal scene he’s riding with his heroes, the Italian team, and they are mean to him, eventually sticking something in his spokes and crashing his bike.  It’s great movie. Go watch it kids. 

That’s what Ollie tried to do to me.  Didn’t work.  My legs were tougher than the stick. 

He’s a pain, but it’s only because he has so much love, so much Joie de vivre, and I’m ok with that.

Because, If you’re going to live, live with zest!

On with the Show!

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – At what age do the wheels fall off? - http://runrunlive.com/at-what-age-do-the-wheels-fall-off

Voices of reason – the conversation

Steve Pero

Attached is a fittingly picture from one of our Grand Canyon runs. Don't look much different these days 

I also included a pic of me running a trail race in 1999.

 

Not sure about a bio...feel free to edit below as much as you want.

 

Born in Cambridge, Ma.

Worked as a Mechanical designer at Polaroid for 32 years, then worked at several other places until I decided to retire in 2017 at age 66.

 

Living in Somerville growing up I got into bodybuilding at a gym. The trainer had me run around the building as a warm up...I liked running so much that I quit the gym and started running more. That was 1975. I saw Bill Rodgers run across the finish line of the Boston Marathon and I was hooked. Started training for Boston and qualified and ran my first in 1980. After 13 Boston's and hundreds of road races, I ran a trail race and was hooked. Ran my first ultra in 1997, won it and became an ultrarunners and now 23 years later, I'm still at it.

 

I live in rural SW NH with my wife, a bunch of chickens, three very pregnant dairy goats, a wonderful dog and cat.

Section two – Pile o sticks  – http://runrunlive.com/pile-o-sticks

Outro

Well, my friends, we have run down into the canyon of our youth and up the other side of our age and wisdom to the happy elysian fields of Episode 4-426 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

Like I said in the intro I’m starting to get serious in my training for Boston.  I’m not racing for a time but I am training as if, because it is the Boston marathon and it deserves respect. 

Thank you to all my friends who have contributed to my ZERO for Prostate cancer campaign for Boston.  I’m getting close to my goal and you, yes you, can push me through the finish!  Links in the show notes.

Also big thanks to the small and dedicated circle of RunRunLive sponsors who pay our bills.  I asked them “What can I do to thank you?” and they simply tell me “Keep doing the podcast.” So, with the bar set at an achievable level onwards we strive!

I’m staying healthy for the most part.  My weight is still a couple pounds over race weight but it’s starting to drop with a slight tweak in diet and the bigger weeks.  It will all come together.  It always does. My Achilles and Plantar Fasciitis and that chronic tendonitis in my butt all speak up once in awhile but that’s just the cost of doing business.  I keep the fires tamped down with judicious rehab and sensible training. 

I’m starting to travel more with the new job which is good news for you.  There is nothing that feeds my creativity more than being trapped in an airplane for 4 or 5 hours.  Also gives me more exposure to the carnival of weirdness that is our modern world.

I rented the movie Midway last week.  It’s really good if you are a history buff and like war movies.  (Which is a good way of saying your wife won’t watch it with you.)  It’s a story that’s been told before but with modern special effects they can put your right in the pilot seat of a Dauntless dive bomber. 

And who, do you think, plays Admiral Halsey?  That’s right a much older Dennis Quaid.  See?  It all ties together.  

I also found the first episode of American Gods was available to watch for free.  Love that Neal Gaimon book.  Worth a watch.

Genes, hat

I’m going to put on my shoes with the chewed laces, go throw Ollie in the truck and drive over to get a haircut and do some grocery shopping now.  While I was writing this, I forgot the latch the door to the master bedroom and the two-tone terror stole my Patriots hat and chewed a hole in it.  Think that’s a bad omen for Brady and Bellichick?

This just in – I received the results from the DNA kit my kids got me for Christmas.  A bit disappointing.  Not a drop of Ashkenazi, Sicilian or Moorish blood.  Just your run-of-the-mill Scotch-Irish with a handful of Norman and a small dash of continental French from my Quebecois Grandmum. 

Celtic thru and thru.  Explains why good beer is like heroin for me and my love of stone walls and roaring fires.  I suppose that’s where I get my endurance.  My folk were chased out of Africa and didn’t stop running ‘til they hit the North Atlantic then sat around in pubs and complained about it.  

Thank you all for your friendship and time.

Hope you got your money’s worth. 

Got a long run in the morning and then I’m off to Dallas for a couple days. 

Keep fighting the good fight and…

I’ll see you out there. 

(Outro bumper)

And the music continues with #4 from Brian Scheff, the Rock Opera by The Nays, “BJ’s Prophecy”, enjoy. 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4426.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:33pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-425 – John and Tom Chat about Cancer

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4425.mp3]
Link epi4425.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-425 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

Well, here we are again, it’s a beautiful, sunny, single-digit, February morning and I’m talking to you! Ollie the collie is being a pain in the butt.  I was on a trip all week so he didn’t get his runs in and he’s very stressed out.  He’s being the toddler-terror today. 

He’s already chewed on a couple socks and the channel changer and is harassing me with a toy as I try to write.  That’s dog life. 

Today, I have a very special and personal conversation with John and Tom, who are both prostate cancer experienced and members of our running circle.  Both of them are friends of mine and I’m honored that they were kind enough to share their stories. 

In section one I’ll talk about the non-linearity of the mileage curve.  In section two I’ll give you a write up of a book I read on the plane this week that I really liked called “Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends on it.” 

All links, including the one where you donate to my prostate cancer campaign for Boston (wink wink nudge nudge) are in the show notes, which, by the way, you should be able to access on your phone or other listening device, as part of the episode meta-data. 

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

Busy couple of weeks.  My training has been going well.  I knocked out a nice 13.8 mile step up run last week and I’m starting to transition into more long tempo as we are getting closer to Patriots Day. 

It’s been relatively mild this winter but getting a wee bit colder.  My long run last week started at 14 degrees.  I forgot my thick gloves and was worried I might have to knock on someone’s door to warm up during that first hour.  It used to be I’d just run harder to warm up but that’s not a great strategy for me anymore in a multi-hour run. 

My bottle froze and my headphones failed.  But, hey, it was sunny and windless, so it wasn’t too bad and I was able to do some thinking and focus on my run.  There is no good or bad run there is only the ‘is’.  I swung by and picked up a couple of my running club buddies for the second loop who I hadn’t seen for a while and had a good catch up. 

Was able to close out the last 30 minutes at close to race pace.  All in all a solid outing. 

Monday morning I was off to Vegas.  I always forget that Vegas is in the Western time zone.  It feels like it should be in Mountain time.  That puts it 3 hours ahead of me, which helps for those morning workouts because you’re up anyhow.

I knocked out a 30-minute time trial on the treadmill Monday morning.  I showed up at the gym in the casino at 5:00AM when it opened, and it was already ¾ full.  There was a line for the equipment when I stepped off an hour later.  All those East Coasters. 

I got a kick out of it though.  I just imagine them thinking “Who’s this old guy knocking out 7-minute miles at 5 AM?”  I’ve turned the corner a bit on worrying about being slower and I’m quite grateful to be getting at it still at all and to be able to do anything a bit quicker makes me happy. 

I got out on the strip during the last day before I headed to the airport.  Always fun to get out and take a look around.  It was mid-60’ss and sunny.  Good to see the sun.

I always like running up and down the strip.  You can do the whole thing in 6 miles.  You have to run up and down the pedestrian bridges. It’s not optimized for running.  It’s optimized to get you into a casino. 

The air is dry there in the desert but misty with the sadness of self-loathing and empty wallets in the mornings.  But, that’s not my story. 

On with the show!

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – The Mileage Curve - http://runrunlive.com/mileage-curves

Voices of reason – the conversation

John Vaughn and Tom Penny

https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/bjsports/early/2016/12/19/bjsports-2016-096343.full.pdf - article from Tom on exercise and cancer treatment

https://tominmotion.blogspot.com/ - Tom’s Blog

https://www.facebook.com/tom.penny67

https://www.facebook.com/JohnFromthePoi

Section two – Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends on it  – http://runrunlive.com/love-yourself-like-your-life-depends-on-it

 

Outro

Well, my friends, we have run past the pyramids in the desert to the end of Episode 4-425.

I’m going to continue to be busy here as I ramp up my specificity for the Boston Marathon.  You can go to http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive to contribute to my cause, I’d appreciate it.

I’m going to wrap this up so I can get out and take Ollie for a walk before he chews through the walls.  I’m pained to say that he has totally not taken any training. In fact he’s reverted. When I say ‘Come’ he runs in the other direction.  When I say “Leave it!” he laughs and plays keep away. 

Nothing is safe in the house.  Last night he brought me a nickel.  I told him to come back with at least a $20.  If I try to watch TV or sit at all he bites me until I stand up.  After the nickel he stole my wife’s hat and chewed the pom-pom off the top.  He’s got demons. 

I didn’t want to go for a walk this morning because it was only 3 degrees out and I wanted to get some writing done.  I was planning to write on the plane but I was too tired and ended up watching the last season of Silicon Valley instead.  That’s a funny show.  I don’t get HBO at the house and can only get certain shows on planes ironically.  

I’m also watching my way through pretty bad scifi series called FarScape on Prime.  Kind of a low-budget Lost in Space meets cosplay. 

 Now that it’s warmed up a bit I’ll take Ollie for a walk and get my errands in.

One of the speakers this week was an author from Stanford named Amy Wilkinson who writes and speaks about the The Creator’s Code: The Six Essential Skills of Extraordinary Entrepreneurs. One of her points was “Small Gifts”.  This resonated with my current practices of gratitude, kindness and empathy.

Her point was to make a practice of giving people small gifts to build trust and reciprocity in relationships.  Not physical gifts, although that’s ok too, but the unexpected gifts of small kindnesses and thankfulness. 

And I’ll leave you with that – who today can you make appoint of thanking for something they did to help you see the world differently? 

And I’ll thank you for letting me think and talk with you on this endurance journey. 

I’ll see you out there. 

(Outro bumper)

To continue my music series I give you track #2 from Brian Scheff, the Rock Opera by The Nays. 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4425.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:17pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-424 – Alix Shutello – The Intersection of Publishing and Endurance

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4424.mp3]
Link epi4424.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-424 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

Some off you may be wondering what happened to me last week! Or not.  I was waylaid by an aggressive intersection of life and technology that prevented me from putting a show out.  It was a cascading series of events that you get sometimes in this squiggly path we are all on. 

First I had an interview set up with Jamie Bearse who heads up the ZERO for prostate cancer foundation that I’ve decide to run Boston for this year.  Oh, right, I got a waiver number from my club for Boston and I’m running again.  Anyhow, Jamie got the flu, not the coronavirus, this was before that reared it’s multifarious ugly heads and we had to reschedule. 

I, not willing to give up, called our friend John Vaughn who is a Prostate cancer survivor and coerced him into recording a last-minute call on the same subject.  Probably the finest and most compelling interview ever done by two mere mortals…

But, something got twiddled sideways in the great bit-locker in the sky and there was no file of the recording to download.  After a week of tet-a-tete with the support guys there was no file.  Meanwhile I was in Phoenix for 5 straight days for a kickoff with my new job.  I did, over-optimistically bring my recording stuff, but, as these things go, was not afforded the chance to create some sort of non-interview filler episode. 

C’est la Vie. Such is life. 

But, even as you mourn the apparent reality that a rigorous and devoted podcaster like myself can’t keep a schedule, all hope is not lost!  I rounded up a great talk with Alix for you for today’s show.  I met Alix on LinkedIn, saw that she runs an endurance sports magazine and had to get her on.  I love to understand the intersection of business and endurance. 

I have two asks today. 

First is that you send me suggestions on people you’d like me to interview.  I don’t have a producer so I have to hunt them down on my own and after 12 years of doing this I’ve talked to a lot of people!

Second ask is to contribute to my Prostate cancer campaign.  I’ll put the links in the show notes.  My friends are dying from this.  It’s important to me. 

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

In the first section I’ll talk about long run paces, again.  In section two I’ll give you my brief understanding of the current OKR wave in organizations. 

How’s my training going?  Actually quite well.  Since I’m planning not to hammer Boston this year my coach has me running basic base building runs so far.  For example this week I have had 4 easy 1:20 runs.  These are not race specific so I can do them in the woods with Ollie and it makes us both quite happy. 

I got every one of my workouts in while in Phoenix.  Proud of that.  I’m heading to Vegas next week and look forward to doing some early morning exploring there as well.

I received multiple ‘feedbacks’ that my grizzly bear audio was just a little too real last episode.  People were startled and looked around on their runs to make sure they weren’t about to be eaten!  Sorry.  Trying to be creative.  Yah know… 12 years and all… got to keep it from becoming too rote.

No, I did not suffer from any grisly grizzly attacks but that was actual audio of a grizzly eating a dead caribou in Yellowstone.  There is a grisly back story here.  And it’s not that someone found a way to mic up a dead caribou. 

If you search for grizzly audio there’s a sort of viral audio of this poor dude and his girlfriend being attacked and eaten by grizzlies in the early 2000’s in Yellowstone.  I did not watch or listen to it because I don’t need that in my head.  Apparently they were trying to video the grizzly with the phone, the grizzly attacked, the phone was dropped and you get a black box narrative of the affair. 

Not my cup o’ tea. 

I won’t leave you with that.  I’ll leave you with something positive.  The days are getting longer up here in New England.  It’s been a mild January and we don’t have much snow.  This means there’s enough sun to get on the trails with the dog around 6:30 AM now.  And it’s cold enough for the trails to be firm and fast. 

There’s nothing like being out in the woods in the silence of a winter’s morning.  Your feet crunching in the frozen ground.  The sun glow highlighting the world in an innocent blur. 

Your friend the dog hiding at the tops of hills to pounce on you, damn near knock you down, and run off laughing like a teenager to find his next ambush spot.

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Long run Nuances - http://runrunlive.com/long-run-nuance

Voices of reason – the conversation

Alix Shutello

https://www.endurancesportsandfitness.com/editorsmessage/

My Story: A Message from the CEO

Hi, my name is Alix Shutello and I started Endurance Sports & Fitness Magazine back in 2010 because someone asked me to. I mean that!  I started writing a blog entitled, Tighthams, to write about my running exploits as a new mom.  

In 2002, I ran the San Diego Marathon pregnant and it wasn’t until 2006 when I wrote about it in my blog. I started the blog, truth be told, to learn how to us WordPress. Many of my 11 magazine clients at the time were starting to blog and leverage social media. I figured if I were going to be able to consult with my clients on blogging, I needed to start blogging myself.

And now I’ve published this blog about running a marathon pregnant, and other women from around the world began responding to the blog. I was immediately humbled. Many of these women had multiple kids, had run through all of their pregnancies, and who still felt that society didn’t agree that women should run pregnant.

In essence, my blog post on running pregnant started a conversation, and that was a lesson I could teach my clients.

I kept up with the blog and started to write reviews on products and post some other topics, all of which seemed to generate a number of comments, so I turned Tighthams from a blog into a company called Runners Illustrated. Runners Illustrated, which played off of a combination of Runners World and Sports Illustrated was a great way for me to report on all aspects of running.

An endurance runner from Australia names Andy Bowen emailed me one day. He asked me if I could start covering endurance races. Bowen was one of a number of athletes who approached me about covering global endurance foot races beyond the marathon. It opened my eyes to a world I didn’t know existed….and from there, Runners Illustrated, which focused on running any distance up to the marathon morphed to include all types of ultra running.

It didn’t stop there. Once I changed the name of Runners Illustrated to Endurance Racing Magazine, the triathlon community found me too – and it didn’t stop there. Endurance Racing Magazine operated from 2012-2016 and covered a number of non-motorized endurance sports including kayaking, canoeing, ultra marathons, adventure racing, Ironman-distance races, ultra-triathlons, duathlons and all other types of trail and road races in between.

In late 2016 I conducted a survey and the title of this publication changed to Endurance Sports & Fitness Magazine. The title, while long, resonated with my readers and created more comfort for those, like me, who are striving to enter the endurance world.

In 2016 the newly redesigned magazine (which was only published digitally) hit the “shelves” with a lot of fanfare.

We hope that you consider supporting the magazine through a subscription or by advertising. The magazine, which is a community-based magazine, is supported by a number of writers who give their time to provide excellent content and rich stories for our reader base. Please subscribe and support our publication.

If you ever need to contact me, reach me at Alix@EnduranceSportsandFitness.com.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Alix Shutello
CEO & Publisher

Section two – On OKR’s – http://runrunlive.com/on-okrs-objectives-and-key-results

Outro

Well, my friends, we have transversed the frozen ground to the end of another RunRunLive Podcast Episode 4-424 lies sweating and spent in the hoar frost.

Nothing new or novel in my training or racing to report.  I’m plunking away build mileage for Boston. I canceled the pacing race on Martha’s Vineyard so I can focus on requalifying in June.  I have signed up for the Tunnel Light Marathon in Oregon which is on a rail trail and is a consistently slightly downhill course. 

I’m not going to run any other races, except for the Groton 10K of course.  This is I think our 29th running of the 10K.  Last Sunday in April, come up and join us. 

If you folks need anything feel free to reach out to me.  I like hearing from you. 

Ollie the collie is doing fine.  He’s just 8 months old now. He’s a stud of an athlete.  We’ll finish this week with somewhere around 30 trail miles.  He’s still incredibly unruly.  He is very vocal, which Buddy was not.  Ollie will spontaneously treat you to a loud, close-range, ear-splitting bark if he wants your attention. 

He’s still very mouthy and jumpy and does not listen well but we’re working on it. 

A couple weeks ago we were out running in the woods and we came upon a large flock of wild turkeys. Probably 20-30 of them.  Ollie was beside himself with joy.  He chased those birds hither and thither.  Some flew away, like turkeys do, they can’t really fly but they can go short distances, some ran away clucking.  Eventually he came back to rejoin me all tuckered out and quite happy with himself.

He’s just come into my office to see me and put his big head in my lap for a hug. 

When I was out in phoenix last week I was thinking about the absurdity of having such a city in the middle of the desert.  Before the modern era you could not do such things at scale. 

One of my mornings I was running along a canal, which I think they called an aqueduct.  It was fenced in.  I did not attempt to breach the barbed wire.  I’ve been known to jump fences, but it looked like they really didn’t want you inside this fence. Turns out, I was told later, that the whole thing is alarmed with motion sensors and if you get inside the fence the authorities rush out to apprehend you. 

That might have made a good running adventure story.

The Puebloans who lived here before got by, but not at this scale.  Cities need a reason to exist.  They need to be near something.  Ancient desert cities were on an Oasis and or near a source of water or trade route. 

You just don’t put a city in the middle of a desert like Vegas or Phoenix for no reason. 

There was a recent discovery of a large city in Egypt from a few thousand years ago.  And they were asking the same question.  Why was this city here?  In the middle of the desert? 

They were able to use modern LIDAR and other airborne surveys to figure it out.  A branch of the Nile used to run by this city.  That branch of the Nile silted up so the residents picked up the whole city and moved it to the next branch of the Nile some 100 miles away. 

We’ll see what happens when Phoenix runs out of water.  And Vegas.  Challenges like this bring out the innovative nature of humans. 

I will see you out there. 

(Outro bumper)

To continue my music series I give you track #2 from Brian Scheff, the Rock Opera by The Nays. 

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4424.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 2:09pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-423 – Great Stories with Anne Audain - The first female professional runner

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4423.mp3]
Link epi4423.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-423 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

For those of you who got a new device for podcast listening over the holidays and are exploring new content, welcome to our tribe.  Or, maybe, you’re embarking on a new year wellness campaign and somehow found it to us.  Welcome.  To my old friends welcome to the new year. 

There are 12 years worth of episodes on our website, with the corresponding blog posts, runrunlive.com.  The site is searchable. There is an index page that lists all the episodes in one place. 

Every year we have a gathering in northern Idaho at the summer solstice at camp Whatafookie if you’d like to join us.  We get naked, paint ourselves blue, take peyote and dance a shamanistic jig to the Earth Goddess.

But, that’s another story. 

Today I’ve got a great interview with Anne Audain.  She’s a native New Zealander who lives it the US now.  She connected to me on FaceBook and when I started reading her bio I was a bit ashamed to have never met her before.  She competed in the 70’s and 80’s at a very high level as part of that great diaspora of New Zealand runners.  She has a great story.  A real hero’s journey.  You are going to love the stories. It’s a great interview. 

If you know someone I should interview let me know.  The rule is - something interesting.  Something you’re curious about.  Something you want to learn more about.  Famous is not a requirement.  I tend to shy away from famous because they are jaded with interviews and give you the pre-recorded schtick.   I I’ve always liked the person-in-the-trenches interviews because they are relatable and applicable to our tribe. 

In section one I’m going to talk about training your dog to run with you – because I have a dog I am currently training and I had multiple people ask me about this. 

In section two we are going to do some tracking in the New England snow. 

Here we are with the first podcast of 2020.  A new year.  A new decade.  You can thank the Romans for this fascination with increments of 10.  It’s not hard to see how they came up with that system based on counting on your fingers. 

But, before the Greeks and Romans counted on their fingers there were other, earlier cultures that counted on their fingers and the knuckles of their fingers to come up with a 12 based system.  That still lingers in our world as dozens and grosses. 

I’ve started training again.  I don’t have anything specific on the calendar yet.  But it feels good to start getting stronger again after taking a break for the holiday season. I put on about 10 pounds but I’m not worried about it. 

It synchs well with the periodicity of my training cycles.  Now, in the beginning of the cycle we focus on strength and aerobic fitness.  There’s no pace work or specific, goal based workouts – so I can carry a couple extra pounds. As long as I feel healthy and eat clean it’s all good and one less thing to stress about. 

I find that the weight will take care of itself as the training intensifies closer to the goal event and it’s counter productive to stress on that too early in a cycle. 

And what are my events and plans?  We’ll just have to save that for the outro. 

But, it’s a new year.  A time of rebirth. 

I usually don’t like to go to deep into my personal business, but this story fits well with the new year theme.  I start a new job next week. I’m excited and apprehensive.  Looking forward to it.  It’s a bit of a change for me.  It’s a bigger company as opposed to the startups I’ve been working with for the past couple decades.  It’s also a step back from management and a step back from direct sales.

I’m quite proud of myself for making this change relatively proactively.  I sat down with myself and asked what do I really want to do right now?  I heard myself, whatever that inner voice is, say, “Right, you’ve got an opportunity to change.  Don’t let your ego or your environment drive the bus.  Make a proactive change because you’re a different person than you were 15 years ago.”

My point is, and I share this with you, because we are all changing all the time regardless of our position, circumstance or maturity. This is part of the journey.  We tend to think in terms of goals this time of year.  What are goals?  Goals are nothing but destinations. 

In this world of change there are no real destinations.  Those goals are only there as waypoints to guide your journey – to keep you from going in circles. 

Instead of goals why not think in terms of virtues this year?  Those things that are the demonstration of you as your best self.

I didn’t put much thought into mine, not because it’s not important, but because to me they came quickly as soon as I asked the question ‘what are the virtues you want to cultivate this year?’  I’m going to focus of three things this year:

  • Gratitude
  • Kindness
  • And Empathy

As I move into the year this will give me the beginner’s mind I need to enable me to work with change. 

So, I ask you, my friends, old and new; What are the virtues you need to cultivate in this new year.  How will those enliven your training, your health, your career and your relationships with others?

Think about that. 

New year, new changes, new you.

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Running with your dog - http://runrunlive.com/training-your-dogs-for-running

Voices of reason – the conversation

Anne Audain

The first female professional runner

Anne Audain was born in New Zealand, adopted as an infant and suffered through her younger years with bone deformities in both her feet. After successful reconstructive bone surgery at age 13, she joined a local athletic club and a running star was born! Through her career Anne set records and pioneered professional running for women. She has since been inducted into the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame, the USA Running Hall of Fame, and honored with a Member of the British Empire Medal from Queen Elizabeth II of England for her contributions to her sport worldwide.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Qualified for Six Olympic Games –1972 to 1992 in every distance from 800m to marathon.
  • Pioneered professionalism for female track and field competitors by accepting prize money at the first professional event in 1981 which resulted in a “temporary” lifetime ban from the sport.
  • Set a World Record for 5000 meters, Auckland, New Zealand 1982.
  • Honored by Queen Elizabeth II of England with a Member of the British Empire award in 1995.
  • Inducted into the Running USA Hall of Fame, 2008. runningusa.org
  • Inducted into the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame, 2009. halloffame.co.nz
  • Inducted into the RRCA Distance Running Hall of Fame, 2014. 
  • Founded the Idaho Women's Celebration 5K (1993) which now has evolved into FitOneBoise.org

HISTORY

  • Born 1955 in Auckland, New Zealand, with severe bone deformities of both feet. Adopted at birth.
  • Did not walk correctly until re-constructive surgery at age 13.
  • Three years later qualified for the 1972 Munich Olympic Games in the 1500m.
  • Graduated from Auckland Teachers College with honors (1975).
  • Taught at the elementary level for 4 years before arriving in the USA to further her sporting career (March 1981).
  • Won more USA road races (75) than any other male or female runner in the 1980’s.
  • Won Gold (3000m) and Silver (10,000m) medals at the Commonwealth Games – Australia 1982, Scotland 1986.
  • Founded the Anne Audain Charitable Trust (1991) to support “at risk” youth in Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Became USA Citizen, 1995.
  •  

Section two – Tracks in the Snow – http://runrunlive.com/tracks-in-the-snow-a-short-play

Outro

Well, my friends, you have told some great stories out on your run, and embraced some change, to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-423.   

I wrapped up the year with the Groton Marathon – my own personal made up series of races on the last Sunday in December each year.  We got about 30 people to show up and run various distances.  5 people ran a marathon.  I woke up a bit under the weather and ended up running the first 12, jumping in a support vehicle to chase down some lost marathoners and then running them in for a total of 22ish miles. 

We got good weather and, as far as I know, no one died. 

I’m starting my strength building for a spring race.  Right now I’m out of qualification and don’t know if I’m running Boston.  You might say, “Chris, that must be a bummer!” but, honestly after 22 Bostons I can take it or leave it. 

If I do get a number, I’ll run for charity.  I’ll train hard enough to respect it.  I’d like to say I won’t race it but you’ve all heard that enough times by now!

(Editors Note:  I just received a waiver bib for Boston so the streak continues to 23)

I’d still like to qualify because it bothers me.  Like an itch I can’t scratch. One of the challenges of being an older athlete is that you can’t go all in on as many races.  You really have to pick your spots.  I feel like I don’t recover fast enough to perform at a high level in that 2nd or 3rd race. 

I’ve got my eyes on the Tunnel marathon in Oregon that Eric qualified at last year.  That seems like a great event for a fast race and it’s out in June so I can get plenty of ramp in my training.  I did sign up to pace a 4:05 at the Marthas Vineyard Marathon May 15th, but I’m wondering if that might not be biting off more than I can chew, even at that easy pace, to recover for an A race 30 days later. 

The last thing I was thinking about after talking Dave at the Groton Marathon was organizing a Rim to Rim to Rim run later in the year.  There’s another weather window in the canyon after Labor Day.  I had so much fun  the last time I ran the canyon.  I’d do it in two days.  Down and out the other side, sleep over, then down and out back to the start. 

Each down and out is less than 20 miles, which should be doable. I think it took Teresa and I about 8 hours to do Bright Angel to Phantom Ranch and back.  Anyhow, let me know if that sounds interesting and we’ll set something up. 

I’ve been working with Ollie on his training.  Since I’m in the non-specific base building part of my training I can take him with me and practice recalls and on-leash behavior.  He’s still a maniac but we’re working on it.  It’s teaching me patience.   I’m super grateful to have this little maniac as a companion on this journey. 

My daughter got me a subscription to Master Class.  If you’re not familiar it’s and app where you can take classes from famous people.  I watched a couple sessions of Malcom Gladwell, which was interesting, but more of a Ted Talk than a class.  It’s all talking head video. 

Another one that I am really getting a lot from is called ‘negotiation skills’ with Chris Voss.  He’s a master negotiator.  I’ve read Herb Cohen.  I have some basic negotiation skills training from Harvard and have been in a lot of negotiations.  But this guy is not so much about the negotiation as he is about the human interaction. 

Very interesting examples of using mirroring and tonality and neurolinguistic programming to get people into a helpful state.  It’s more of a “Pick up artist” type skill set than negotiation tactics. 

I’ll let you get on with your life.  Thank you for sharing this endurance journey with me.  If you need anything let me know.  Reach out and say ‘hey’.

We’ve all got a lot to be thankful for in this new decade, this new year.  What ever happens you will handle it with grace and kindness. 

And Ollie and I will see you out there. 

(Outro bumper)

Like I said last time I’m going to close out episodes with music for the foreseeable future.  This week we are starting a series.  There’s a back story that I need to tell you.  You all know my running buddy Frank.  He is the first guy I interviewed in episode 1 and also in episode 100 and also an episode where we talked about his hip resurfacing. 

I’ve been running with Frank for over 20 years.  Frank is a member of a band called the Nays.  They recently released a rock opera about a friend of the band named Brian Scheff. 

So I give you now, over the next 20 shows, “Brian Scheff, the rock opera”.  And I am eternally grateful for all the miles and hours Frank has spent with me listening to my stories and creating stories of our own.

I don’t know if there’s a way to buy this music, but if you’re interested I can find out. 

Cheers, all.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4423.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 6:25pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-422 – Robert Moore Boston Back in the Day

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4422.mp3]
Link epi4422.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-422 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

Merry Christmas, happy Hanukah and happy New Year.  I hope you’re having a great holiday season, if that’s part of your story.

Today we talk with Bob Moore who is a guy who raced back in the 70’s, coming in 5th and 7th and 7th at Boston back when it was an entirely different thing to run a marathon.  With folks like Bob I just ask a couple open ended questions and let them go. 

I think that’s something we can practice during these holidays when you might be speaking with people you’ve haven’t seen for a while.  Remember, how much joy they get from telling their story and practice active listening.  It’s a gift for them and for you. 

In section one I’m going to counsel you on how to cheap out on your winter running gear because anyone who has run with me knows how cheap I am! 

In section two I’m going to talk about how to turn worry about a big event or deadline into a positive force. 

My running has been going well.  I’m still in hibernation mode.  I try to get out for a mile or so walk with Ollie as part of my morning routine and find that helps him and me start the day well. 

I’m still running 4 days a week.  Tuesday and Thursday I get out for 8-9 road miles at a zone 2 effort.  I’ve got a nice, mostly back-road loop that I can run at night with getting run over and I find it quite comforting.  Then on Friday I try to get out during the day with Ollie in the trails for another 10k or.  The trails are frozen and you can’t go fast, but again it is good for him and I to get out. 

I mix up it up.  Mostly off leash, even though he’s very jumpy and exuberant with people.  He won’t attack or be mean, but he can be overwhelmingly friendly.   I’ve got a 50/50 chance of getting him to come when called to get back on leash. 

I also run him on leash and he’s pretty good with that.  Once he tires out a bit and stopped trying to pull me like it’s the Iditarod.  Sometimes I’ll drop the leash and let it drag.  Buddy figured how to run with the leash dragging between his legs and not step on it.  Ollie hasn’t figured that out.  When I drop the leash he picks it up in his mouth and runs with it.  It’s super cute. 

He’s still growing like a weed.  I’ve found a new trainer and I’m going to do some focused work over the next couple weeks before I start my new job. 

My wife bought a bunch of stuff from Sears because she had a gift card she needed to use up before they go out of business.  It all showed up at the house in packages and boxes.  I was wrapping presents for Christmas and offered to wrap all these for her as well.

She of course, said yes, and even had me wrapping my own presents. 

Since I now was in charge I wrapped and labeled the gifts appropriately with the recipients name.  But for my own gifts, that she had bought for me, and now was having me wrap for her I didn’t put my name on them.  I labeled them “Sexy”. 

So on Christmas morning when my kids were passing sorting through the gifts they had to ask, “Who’s Sexy?” To which I replied “I am!” 

And there you have it.  You are responsible for your own narrative.  When someone gives you a chance to tell your own story, make it a good story.   

On with the show,

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Winter running gear for cheapskate - http://runrunlive.com/winter-running-for-cheapskates

Voices of reason – the conversation

Robert Moore

Dear Chris Russell,

                                I apologize for taking so long to get in touch. The last while has been hectic with six hours of teaching at the Chiroproactic College, seven hours of teaching at the Homeopathic College and preparation of webinars for the Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists and the Naturopaths.

                                 At Boston I was 5th, 7th, 7th and 7th. My best time was 2 hours 16 minutes and 45 seconds in 1974. Jerome Drayton and I are in the same club. I still compete. I am up to 1904 races of record.

                                  I knew Ed Whitlock for decades. At first I was a lot faster than him but at the end he was faster. I never did formal research on him but a woman that I have heard of at McGill University may have done so.

Best wishes,

                      Robert Moore.

Section two – On worrying about big events and deadlines – http://runrunlive.com/worry

Outro

 

Well, my friends, you have made it, with great gusto, to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-422.   

This weekend I’m going to host the 7th edition of the Groton Marathon.  Which is a made up series of races that I started after the Boston incident in 2013.  My club and anyone else who wants to show’s up and runs whatever distance they want on the last Sunday of December.  I’m going the distance.  Looks like I’ll have a ½ dozen or so for company. 

Looks like good weather. 

I’m not in shape for a marathon, but I can fake it.  We’ll go slow and stop a lot.  At least I’m not sick this year. 

After that I’m formulating my next season plans.  I don’t know if I’m running Boston or not this year.  If I get in I’ll run for charity.  I’ll train hard enough to respect it but won’t try to requalify.  But, I am going to look for a race to focus on in May or June to requalify at.

I called coach and threw myself on his mercy.  After the Groton Marathon we’ll get busy.  I did volunteer to pace a marathon in May out on Martha’s Vineyard.  If that sounds like fun for you, come on up and join me. 

I’m thinking a 100K later in the summer would be cool.  I’ve never run a 100K race – so Bam! Built in PR!

I’ll tell you a funny story from last week.  Like I alluded to, I’m going to start a new job in January.  And yes, this is where the advice in section two today came from. I wrote that as I was flying down to Dallas for an interview. 

At one point the hiring manager asked me, “So, you have all this experience and these skills but what new thing are you learning right now?”  I thought about this for a beat, the interview was going well, so I had a bit of good will to risk.  I answered, “Well, I’m currently learning how to run across the United States.”  I swear that lady’s head near exploded. 

That was pretty funny. I haven’t seen a comic doble take and an audible “Wow!” in an interview before. 

More to the point, because you all know I’m a different kind of animal by now, what they were trying to get at is am I still able to learn?  Do I have a growth mindset?  Do I have an attitude of abundance? 

Being the smartest guy in the room isn’t necessarily a useful thing if you can’t learn. 

So don’t forget to learn new things and push your limits no matter who you are or where you are in your story.  You get to create that narrative. 

To take you out I may append a piece of holiday music from Eric’s wife Tammy.  They do a holiday CD every year.  She’s a pianist. 

I’ll put a link to the whole CD if you’re interested in the show notes. 

Going forward we are going start working in more music.

Because life is better with music. Consider it music therapy.

https://soundcloud.com/user-789423019/sets/strand-christmas-mixtape?fbclid=IwAR3xQ_DddyV5O_n5GNCYm60mJAJ1OwAraoXObIiUkB6oHitZHqMl_ioNOEw

I’ll see you out there. 

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4422.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 6:03pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-421 – Coach Talk About the Off Season

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4421.mp3]
Link epi4421.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-421 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

Today we have a good show for you – I talk to the coach about how to manage the off-season which is what most athletes treat this time of year as.  Good practical stuff.

In section one I’m going to review the science / opinion on fasting and how it interacts with endurance sports. 

In section two I’m going to talk about how to actively cultivate peacefulness – because I think it’s a message we need to hear this time of year. 

We are also going to talk about testicles or the lack thereof.  Because that’s just where I am in the never-ending carnival that is daily life. 

Ollie the collie is doing well.  He had surgery on Monday and is officially neutered.  You would think that would slow him down.  It did for about a day but he is quickly back to his maniac ways. 

I’ve been hunting around now for our next training opportunity.  He’s a great, smart, athletic boy but I need him to learn some simple stuff – like come when called or we are both going to get in trouble.  He also loves to destroy anything laying around the house if we’re not watching.  And, he’s very mouthy.  He loves the taste of human flesh.  I mean, who doesn’t?  But it can get annoying, especially in mixed company. 

When I was at the vet this week for the ‘adjustment’ I asked for recommendations on training.  They gave me a contact that they highly recommended.  I conversed with this trainer.  Their program was to take the dog for 3 weeks and deliver him back fully trained.  No muss, no fuss. 

Sounds good, right?   They just show up 3 weeks later and hand you the keys to the car.  The only problem I had was that they want $3500 for the process, which I’m sure is quite reasonable, but above my price bracket.  Clearly, I’m becoming that old guy who expects everything to cost a quarter. 

We are going to another consultation with a trainer today and we’ll see where that goes. 

Another funny story is when I try to do yoga or core work Ollie thinks this is a great opportunity to wrestle on the floor with me.  It’s impossible. It’s funny, but it’s impossible.  Again, who doesn’t’ love a good wrestle on the floor? 

Continuing our theme of testicles, I had a fairly hilarious sponsorship opportunity this week.  I got an email from one of those outfits that is trying to make money off podcasts by aggregating niche shows like mine and selling them as a package to sponsors. 

This story might be considered a bit PG-13 so you’ve been warned. 

Now, I don’t do sponsorship in general, because a) I hate commercials in my podcasts with the burning hate of a thousand suns and b) I just don’t have enough downloads to move the needle money wise.  I mean it would be hatefully annoying to you folks, a big hassle for me all for something like $20 a month. 

But the example sponsor they held out to me as attractive commercial bait was a company called Manscaped.  Intrigued I looked them up and yes, they are a new company offering everything you need to create lovely topiaries in your nether regions. 

Which is a bit amusing, but the names of their products had both my wife and I howling with laughter. 

Their main product is an electric shaver called, wait for it, ‘The Lawn Mower’.   A body wash called ‘The Crop Cleanser’, a hydrating toner called ‘Crop Reviver’ , subtitled ‘Ball Toner’ and an anti-chafing product called ‘Ball Deodorant’. 

And the website copy is just a delight to read.

So there you go.  A gift for the man who has everything… and they didn’t even have to pay me. 

On with the show,

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Fasting and endurance athletes - http://runrunlive.com/on-fasting-for-athletes

Voices of reason – the conversation

Coach Jeff Kline

Team PRSFit

https://teamprsfit.com/

Support ZERO for Prostate Cancer

What I bring to the individual is 25 years of experience.

My  approach to training is individual focused and comprehensive. I believe that coaching is about educating my athletes not just giving you a schedule. Communication, structure, guidance and motivation is the complete package that I offer to everyone I work with.

I limit the number of athletes I work with to 20. This ensures you get the attention and high quality coaching you need to achieve your goals.

“No individual is too big, too small, or too slow not to be coached.”.

  • Ironman U Certified
  • Lydyard Level II Certified
  • Certified Natural Running Coach
  • Certified Total Immersion Swim Coach
  • Certified Nutrition and Wellness Coach
  • Certified Personal Trainer

In addition the coach completed his studies in nursing with a specialty in orthopedics and nutrition. He was published by the Colorado Nurses Association.

The Coach only works with 20 athletes.

Section two – Peace and Action – http://runrunlive.com/inner-peace

Outro

 

Well, my friends, you have made it, hopefully without any undo chafing or stinkiness, to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-421.   

Peace be with you.  Go in Peace.    

I’m still in my down phase.  Running 2-4 days a week.  Keeping my miles in the mid-30’s a week.  Started working some core work and yoga back in on the off days and boy it is amazing how fast you lose your fitness when you take a couple weeks off.  For those first couple of core workouts I was sore as heck afterwards. 

I raced the Mill Cities Relay last week.  I took the first leg.  It’s about 5 ½ miles.  The challenge was that we woke up to very cold weather.  It was about 1-2 degrees F when my leg kicked off.   It was sunny and there was no wind, so it was not uncomfortably cold.  But the air was super dry and hard to breathe.

As is my habit I went out too fast and struggled a bit in the middle miles.  Not my best race ever.  But, I just kept reminding myself how lucky I am to be able to get out and do this.  How there are plenty of people in my age group who would kill to be able to do it. 

My team ended up averaging 7:07’s across the 27 miles, which is respectable for our over-50 crew but still only put us 5th in our age group.  Most importantly we had a blast and it was a beautiful day.  Really a privilege to be able to run with those guys. 

Next up for me is the Groton Marathon, an entirely made up race on the morning of the last Sunday in December.  The story is that when I was running my marathon a month in 2013/2014 in response to the Boston Marathon incident that year, my December marathon got canceled due to weather.  So I made up my own marathon, grabbed some running buddies and just did it myself.  My life, my rules. 

Now we’re 7 years in and still doing it.  I’ve got a handful of folks signed up.  It’s a casual run around the towns on back roads with no fuss.  I’m not in any kind of shape this year so it will be slow.  But, we’ll have some good cheer, some good conversations, take some pictures and celebrate that we live in a world where you can make up your own marathon and have people show up.

And with that, Ollie and I will see you out there. 

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4421.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 3:48pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-420 – Kicksology

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4420.mp3]
Link epi4420.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-420 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   

It is the week of Thanksgiving up here in New England.  We haven’t gotten any snow yet at my house.  The trails are very runnable. Ollie the Collie and I are getting out 2-3 times a week.  He’s still a menace.  I won’t be able to get away with the ‘Oh, sorry, he’s just a puppy…’ line much longer. 

He’ll knock out 8 to 10 miles easy with me in the trails.  I like to let him off leash so he can burn some energy.  It’s takes about 4 ½ miles for him to settle down.  Until that point he’s sprinting up and down the trail.  It’s a challenge because he has no manners and won’t come when he’s called and just loves to meet and greet people we run into. 

He’s got another gear now and when he goes, I can’t catch him.  I’ve started referring to him as the ‘monochrome menace’.  But he’s a good runner and he minds well when he’s on leash.  He’ll be a good partner but I’m going to have to break him, like a wild stallion.  He’ll be my Bucephalus.  

(Editor’s note: all classical references will be linked to Wikipedia in the show notes)

Today we have a good show for you.  Yeah you.  You know who you are. 

But first an advertisement for a new cologne that I’m producing for the holidays.  It’s called RunRunLive and it is the pleasing scent of sweat and dog ass.  Buy yours today at the RunRunLive web store.  Comes in a 16-ounce pop-top tall boy. 

Today we chat with Brian Metzler about his new book Kicksology which is all about the evolution and lore of the running shoe.  Brian is a veteran running journalist.  Chances are you’ve read something that Brian has created or touched.  He has been a frequent contributor and started or edited a few of your favorite running publications.    

What I liked about the book was that it was a trip down memory lane for me.  We love our shoes.  We have an irrational passion for a good pair of shoes.   Brian does a good job of tapping into that.

In section one we are going to talk about breathing. 

In section two we’re going to talk about memory and redemption. 

Since we last talked, you and I, I went for my annual check up.  Apparently, I’m still healthy.  I’ve been working hard on overeating and drinking too much beer for a couple months.  I’m up 8-10 pounds, but it’s part of my natural cycle.  I can already feel the tug of the pendulum in the other direction.

I have some good news for you men.  They have determined that the manual test for prostate problems has no efficacy.  No more fingers up the poop chute.  My doctor was reflective.  He said of all the hundreds of these tests he’s done he only ever found 6 anomalies and none of those turned out to be actual problems. 

Thanks again to Peter for reading that piriformis bit into audio last episode.  I got some great feedback on that. 

I told you I’m trying to make November the month of gratitude.  I have so much to be thankful for.  I’ve been trying to get my morning routine in line by meditating a bit. 

I’m going to share a technique I learned that might help you in this season of thanks giving. This is apropos given that we will be talking about breathing next.  Here’s the technique, and you can do this while you’re meditating, or running or sitting in the car. 

Inhale gratitude. 

Exhale that gratitude out into the world. 

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Breathing and running - http://runrunlive.com/breathing-and-running

Voices of reason – the conversation

Brian Metzler

Kicksology

https://www.velopress.com/books/kicksology/

Brian Metzler is a freelance journalist who covers running, running gear, and related sports.

A running shoe geek since his prepubescent cross-country team days, Metzler has run more than 75,000 miles in his life, tested more than 1,500 pairs of running shoes, run focus groups for several running shoe brands, raced every distance from 50 yards to 100 miles, raced to the top of the Willis (Sears) Tower in Chicago, run a marathon on top of the Great Wall of China, completed two high-altitude 100-mile ultraruns, completed four Ironman triathlons, and regularly races with donkeys in Colorado.

Metzler was the founding editor and associate publisher of Trail Runner and Adventure Sports magazines and was a senior editor at Running Times as well as Editor-in-Chief of Competitor magazine and Competitor.com. He has written about endurance sports for OutsideRunner’s WorldTriathleteInside TriathlonMen’s Health, and Men’s Journal. He is the author of Running Colorado’s Front Range and co-author of Natural Running with Danny Abshire and Run Like a Champion with Alan Culpepper.

https://www.velopress.com/velopress-author/brian-metzler/

https://muckrack.com/brianmetzler

 

Section two – Memories and Redemption – http://runrunlive.com/on-memories-and-redemption

Outro

 

Well, my friends, you have made it with gratitude to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-420 in those brand new running shoes that you are thankful for. 

Like I said I’m just doing 2-4 runs a week right now with Ollie.  Not training for anything specific. 

I ran the local Thanksgiving 5k with my running club friend yesterday.   I had planned to walk it with Teresa but her foot was too hurt still.  That put me in a bit of a bind because I wasn’t planning on running Thursday and I definitely wasn’t planning on racing a 5K.  I ran with Ollie in the woods on Monday and Wednesday.

It worked out ok.  I just lined up in the 8:00 min mile section and eased into it.  I ran easy and got pulled along by the crowd.   Ended up being surprised to average a 7:26 pace.  Since I wasn’t hammering it I was being chatty with the other runners.  I’m a new level of annoying when you are running all out and I pull up beside you and start chatting.

Next up, next weekend is the Mill Cities Relay.  I’ve got a good Men’s 50+ team and we’re going to have fun. 

Then of course since I choose to live in a world where you can make up your own marathon and just show up without training on the last Sunday of December, we will be holding the 7th edition of the Groton Marathon.  I’ve got a handful of loonies signed up.  All are welcome. 

Like I said earlier I’ve been putting in a lot of miles with Ollie.  Thursday was a long day for Ollie.  We had a lovely long walk in the Shaker conservation land in the bright, cold morning.  I was able to let him off leash so that he could sprint about through the swampy underbrush.  We were out for almost 2 hours. 

Then we worked all day at Katie’s new house painting the walls and ceilings.  Ollie’s role in this is supervisorial.  He tests the quality of the painting by licking the freshly painted walls.  He enforces a schedule of mandatory puppy wrestling breaks. In this way we all stay limber for the work at hand.

Later in the day he and I managed to beat the setting sun to a nice trail run.  We ambled through the soggy leaves for 6.5 more miles. 

I was tired too.  My body was heavy from the unaccustomed time on my feet all day and the strange angles and dangles of honest work.

We stood there steaming in the winter leaves and watching the sun melt into the trees. 

I asked Ollie, “How you feeling?  Is this too much work, too much training?”

He turned to me with his sharp brown eyes, considered me for a few long moments and responded, “No, Old-one, it is right that we train long.  For we must be prepared.  The day is coming when we will need to fight.  We will need our aerobic capacity and strength.”

“Really”, I said, “How so?”

He suppressed a small growl and pawed at the soft leaves and continued, “Grey-one, the time is coming soon when all will be ruin.  When the last remaining humans will be confined to carpeted cubicles and forced to ‘cuddle’ (here he seemed to sneer the word) and scratch behind ears and speak baby talk…We must be prepared.  We few remaining working dogs and humans for the Doodle Apocalypse.”

And with that he trotted off up the trail with a seriousness and purpose no 6 month old dog should be forced to carry.

And…

I will see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4420.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:30pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-419 – Dawn’s Wisdom

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4419.mp3]
Link epi4419.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-419 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

So – I’m a week late with this one, but it’s great show.  Think about it this way – we gave it an additional week to marinate, to grow, to rise like rustic bread or age like fine wine. 

Last week I was all lined up to get the show out for Friday. Thursday was my birthday.  I took Thursday and Friday off from work to recuperate a bit and was working on the show.   Then, ironically as I was writing the hero’s journey piece that is in section two, that talks about how life is not a straight line, and it seldom goes as you expect it to, my old computer ceased to turn on. 

I’ve had this Microsoft surface since at least 2015 and it’s been the best computer I ever.  It was powerful enough to do all the audio editing for the show, it has a great form factor for traveling.  Just a great machine that matches my need. 

End of this story is that I spent all day Friday in the Microsoft store and ended up buying a new surface that I am happily tapping away on now.  I didn’t loose any data, just some time – and oh by the way – I’m about $2,000 lighter so you might want to consider becoming a member of the RunRunLive Podcast to help defray unexpected expenses. 

So with that excuse out of the way let me take you back to the primordial jungles of North America where strange and dangerous beasts roam dark, dank forests….

(Fade in Jungle music)

Our old friend Peter Herridge everyone with that excellent dramatic reading. 

That piece of writing has been kicking around in my head or a few years.  Probably since I first heard the word ‘piriformis’ and thought, that sounds like the name of a nasty dinosaur.  I immediately thought of Peter who has such a great voice.  Peter was a good runner in his day and one of the original podcasters from a decade ago when we all got online and met each other. 

Peter does a podcast every once in a while called ‘spikes’.

Today we have a really good, timely chat with Dawn.  I have been following Dawn for a few years but never had her on the show.  She is a heavy social media poster and for some reason I see her posts on LinkedIn a lot.  I have always treated LinkedIn as a professional network and haven’t let this ‘hobby’ side of my life bleed over into it.  She stands out, because you’ve got all these businesspeople talking about business stuff and then there’s Dawn talking about empowerment and Joy. 

This time of year, in the northern hemisphere anyhow, we all get stressed out.  The weather turns.  The days get shorter.  If you have kids their schedule ramps up.  It’s budget-setting time and trade show season at your work.  The end of the year is approaching with holidays and deadlines and sales quotas.  It tends to push people into anxiety and depression. 

I was there myself this month.  With my work having challenges, me getting older and an unruly puppy to train.  Things just felt awful and closed in and trapped.  My mind started repeating a scarcity narrative of how much I don’t have and how much I’ve lost.  Which, I know is ridiculous, because I’m one of the most blessed and lucky people you’ll ever meet, but that’s how your brain works, especially this time of year.

Then I stumbled across one of Dawn’s posts talking about gratitude and abundance.  By the way, one of the symptoms of this downward-spiraling mental malaise is you start trying to distract yourself online.  Whether it’s FB scrolling or too much news or video games.  That’s a bad way to avoid life.  Anyhow, I took a deep breath and declared November a month of gratitude. 

In section one I’m going to suggest two useful ways you can use your off-season training to learn some new skills and add to your running assets. 

In section two we are going to take the hero’s journey together.  Because one of the most effective way to contextualize your experience in this world is to see it as a journey.  Tell your narrative as a journey. 

And that is what we are going to talk about today.  Gratitude and journeys. 

Because, my friends, no matter how low or shitty it gets the hero in you always knows the way.  Without the shitty parts there can be no hero.  I saw a great post this week that said ‘failure is like stepping in manure, it stinks when you do it but it makes for great fertilizer!”

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Using your in-between time - http://runrunlive.com/what-to-do-when-you-have-some-time-between-races

Voices of reason – the conversation

Dawn Ciccone

Make your day a new & exciting adventure! Discover your incredible life.

Dawn Ciccone

http://www.attainyourbestlife.com

A marathoner, writer, personal trainer, nutrition and running coach, Dawn offers methodologies learned from experience!  Her passion is to help people face challenges, dIscover the gifts they bring and trust themselves as the beautifully powerful person you’re meant to be.

 

Dawn has conquered abusive relationships, addiction, disordered eating and came through a tragic accident that left her helpless. Dawn has been where you’re at and knows how to turn challenges into opportunities!

 

Credentials

Certified RRCA &

 

USTAF coach

 

American Red Cross Health & Safety Instructor

 

Certified Nutritional Health Educator and Personal Fitness Trainer

 

Certified Master Reiki Practitioner, intuitive, empath, lightworker, transformational speak.

 

Section two – Your Hero’s Journey– http://runrunlive.com/your-heros-journey

Outro

Well, my friends, you have Made it with gratitude to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-419. 

Okey – Dokey – I’m in a down phase in my training.  Which is another, kinder way of saying I’m not training much.  Much for me that is.  I’m just doing 3 days a week in the trails with Ollie the Collie and then a longer run with the boys on Sundays – somewhere in the 20-30 miles a week.  I’ve fattened myself back up with some poor nutritional choices as well, but I think we need to take these breaks to rebalance the humors every once in a while. 

I know discipline is power but that can burn you out and I’ve got a lot going on right now.  I’m noticing that I’m starting to get the bug again to do something epic.  Got any suggestions?  I’m not sure if I’ll get into Boston this year.  If I don’t that opens up the spring for something. 

Coming up is our traditional Thanksgiving 5k.  But, Teresa hurt her foot, so I’m going to walk it with her.  Maybe we’ll start early and take the dog. 

After that the first week of December is the Mill Cities Relay.  I was running with my buddies Brian and Frank and we came up with a the bright idea of entering our own team.  You only need 5 people and we already had 3 so how hard could it be?  As I started reaching out to some of our old running friends, (in our age group), I found that many of them were no longer running at all due to age-related injuries. 

In a weird Schadenfreude way they made me feel pretty good about the fact that I’m still getting out there.  It also reminded me to be kinder to myself.

Finally, I am planning to run the Groton Marathon, and organize it, for the 7th edition on December 29th this year – please come up and run with us.  It’s fun. 

What about Ollie the collie?

We were asked not to come back to puppy training. 

It started as we were sitting patiently, waiting for class to start.  Ollie the border collie puppy and myself in the big box pet store.  It was our 3rd class.  Ollie was doing well, learning quickly.  The dopey brown doodle came in with it’s handler all stupid and goofy, doh do doh.  The dopy doodle’s exuberance overruled the owners’ ability to control it and it pulled its way over into our space to check out Ollie.

Ollie was not happy about this. 

He turned to look at me and said  “Dad, what is this madness?   These doodles and snoodles and snickerdoodle caboodles?  What right do they have to play with the canine DNA of pure breeds for their own amusement?  These freaks!  These aberrations! This cannot stand! I draw the line here! I must stop this madness!  Foul abomination I strike at thee! I will blot your aberration from this world!”

At least that’s what I thought he said, because it was at this point he went berserk and tried to murder the doodle.  But, since I was holding him by the collar he turned and sunk his teeth into my hand.  As I was bleeding and shaking with fear, that’s when the nice lady said maybe we should leave and not come back. 

On the one hand Ollie is mental and that has its challenges.  But, on the other hand, I’m kinda jealous because that’s exactly the kind of punk-rock, hard core mental many of us tried to be as teenagers!

He’s just coming up on 6 months old and he’s already 31 pounds of muscular athlete with a big brain to boot.  He’s running 20 – 30 miles with me off leash in the woods each week and he’s scary fast and strong.  He’s not much on cuddling, but as they say, he’s someone you’d want to share a fox-hole with.

I just have to train him up.  He’s going to be a great dog. 

And remember, as Ollie says, Death to Doodles!

I will see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4419.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:14pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-418 – Matt’s Long Ride

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4418.mp3]
Link epi4418.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-418 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

It’s been a busy couple of weeks since we last talked.  I did jump on the Ferry out of Hyannis to Nantucket for that half marathon.  It was kind of fun but also a bit of a struggle.  When I first signed up for it, I thought it would be a fun outing.  Maybe take my wife along or some of my running buddies. 

In the end it was just me.  I met up with the other pacers on the ferry and met some nice people in the race.  It was a nice sunny day.  It was a pretty big race considering it was out on an island. 

This race fell a week before my target race, the BayState Marathon, and I planned to use it just as a final easy run.  That was the plan.  With how inconsistent my training has been this summer I wasn’t feeling very excited about it.  I offered to run the 2:00 pace group, but they had a greater need for the 1:50 and I acquiesced. 

I don’t run a lot of ½ marathons, and my math gets fuzzy.  A 1:50 half is the equivalent of a 3:40ish full marathon, and while not super challenging for where I am right now, it wouldn’t be the lark that a 2:00 would.  It works out to a 8:23 ish pace versus a 9:09 pace. 

I went in tired.  My week was weird and my tempo run slipped to Friday, which was probably too close to the race.  My whatever-it-is pain in my butt wasn’t helped by the long ride down to the Cape.  I made the morning ferry with no issues and had no issues finding the pace team at the start.

I lost my pace group early.  The first part of the course is a lot of sand roads.  They had had a storm for the previous couple days before the race that dumped a lot of rain and left numerous large puddles straddling the road side-to-side.  It turned those early sections into a bit of a steeplechase.  As a pacer I’m supposed to maintain pace no matter what – so I did and lost everyone who was trying to keep up with me. 

I was trying to run by the overall average pace on my watch.  Which was a mistake.  I figured if my overall average was an 8:22 – 8:23 I’d be right on that 1:50 finishing time.  I ended up right on an 8:23.  I slowed down a little at the end because I was all alone and thought I might be a bit too fast.  That turned out to be the mistake and I crossed about 30 seconds too slow – which is a cardinal sin in the pacing biz.  I’ll probably get excommunicated. 

Pacing isn’t as easy as it sounds. 

Even though my average pace was exactly where it needed to be based on my watch, I missed the clock time.  It’s a bit befuddling.  My watch is always off a little on the distance and I guess that could be worth 30 seconds.  It looks like the only strategy that works is to have your mile splits written out, hard copy and check every mile – old school pacing.  And then plan to be a minute early on top of that to make up for variability. 

I got it done, but I didn’t feel great.  Another small racing failure in what has been several months of disconsolate results and discontent.  My whatever-it-is pain in my butt was screaming in the car-ride home.  I was in a bit of a blue mood rolling into the last week of taper for BayState. 

And that, my friends is what we will talk about in section one! 

In our interview today we talk with Matt about his recent experience of riding his bike unsupported across the TransAm route and then writing about it. 

In section two I’m going to rant a little on the current ‘hustle’ culture. 

As I was lined up in the starting corral in Lowell, the city of my birth, a city that I have some history with.  I had one of those pure moments that I love about racing. 

When you are there, on race morning, all the waiting is over.  The decisions have all been made.  It’s a pure moment.  The expectations and worrying are washed away by the rising sun.  The volunteer singing the national anthem fills your soul and dampens your eyes.  It is a pure place without affectation, without choice and filled with the energy of being set free onto the course.  

How many pure moments like that are left in our world?

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – BayState 2019 - http://runrunlive.com/baystate-half-marathon-2019

Voices of reason – the conversation

Matt

Hi Chris,

 I’ve been a listener to your podcast for years now. You’ve been a constant source of entertainment and motivation in my life. I really enjoyed your Marathon BQ book, and used it for my marathon. Though most of my training has been more in the ultra-cycling world, geared towards 24 hour cycling events, and last year I raced Trans AM, a 4200 mile ride from Astoria Oregon to Yorktown Virginia. One of the things that saw me through those 16 hours of riding every day was listening to your podcasts.

 Riding across country was a profound enough experience that I wrote a book about my journey “As Fast As You Can: How I Biked Across The U.S. In Duct-Taped Shoes” and there’s a quote from you in there from the podcast when you were talking about your 100 mile race “Here’s the uncomfortable truth.  There is no strategy that is going to allow you to stretch the effort over the distance to make things sunshine rainbows and unicorns.  You are going to be uncomfortable.  At some point, things are going to suck.  And not just for a few minutes like a 5K or 10K.  It’s going to suck for hours on end.  Your goal is to acclimate to the suck.  You can keep going with raw bleeding patches of skin.  It just sucks.”

~ Chris, from the “Run Run Live” Podcast.

That was one of my favorite things that you’ve said, and it helped keep me going.
If you’re interested, I’d love to work with you, maybe talk with you on your podcast. I have a modest facebook following and would do everything in my power to help promote your show, to add what support I can.

Let me know if you’re interested. And thank you for being an inspiration.

Regards,

Matt Kovacic

https://www.facebook.com/matt.kovacic.5

https://www.amazon.com/As-Fast-You-Can-Duct-Taped/dp/1733492100

 

Section two – Hustle– http://runrunlive.com/hustle

Outro

Well, my friends, you have peddled non-stop across the country to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-418.  Time to put some nut-butter on those saddle sores. 

I was flying back from Miami this week and looking out the window when the following words bubbled to the top of my brain: “Clouds boil up out of the southeast humidity escaping from the cauldron of the world.”

That’s how my brain works sometimes.  It paints pictures with words. 

But, let’s talk about something important.  Ollie the Collie. 

Last week we started puppy class.  Which is a very good thing because he is a wild man.  Technically I could just train him myself without class but this, as in all things, is better with a coach.  Going in I was pretty sure Ollie would be the crazy, uncontrollable puppy in puppy class.  He’s got so much energy and he’s really busy. 

I was pleasantly surprised to find that Ollie was the smartest, calmest puppy in class.  It’s a border collie thing.  When it’s time to work they fall in line.  He picked up the commands right away and he didn’t cause any trouble.  He’s going to be a good dog.

I forgot to mention last show that I met up with Tim when I was in Chattanooga a couple weeks ago and we went for a trail run up on Signal Mountain.  It was good to see him.  He’s retired now and is planning to through-hike the Appalachian Trail next summer. 

These long endurance events like the AT and Matt’s Trans AM can be game changers.  Matt’s a great example of just deciding to do something and doing it in a way that changes your life.  It’s one of those things that will become a fulcrum for his life journey. 

If you think about your life’s trajectory, we tend to fall into a path and either consciously or unconsciously build the conditions that keep us on that path.  One of these big events is a great lever, to pry yourself out of that rut. 

I’ve got a funny story about Matt’s interview.  As you may or may not know I have an editor for these interviews.  One of the most time-consuming and hard to automate parts of the podcasting process is the audio editing of the interviews.  The process is that you have to play the interview and cut out the bad bits. 

By definition it’s a hard thing.  You have to understand what is being said to know whether it is pertinent or not.  I do my best to be consistent, but some interviewees are harder than others.  Sometimes we go down non-value-added (re: boring) rat holes that need to be ferreted out.  Sometimes I get a real talker or I lose track of time and the interview has to be significantly shortened. 

I have had many good interview editors over the last many years that we’ve been in business.  Currently I work with Dimitry who live in Moscow.  He does a good job and seems to have learned my method well enough to make these tricky edits.  I pay him for each show – and that is one of the things I use subscription money for. 

It doesn’t seem to bore him too badly.  I have had other editors quit on me, basically saying “I can’t take any more of this!”  Sometimes he’ll comment on what he thought was an interesting topic or person. 

With Matt’s interview, Dimitry was very enthusiastic.  He said that he, himself, was a “Bike-Packer” as well and wondered how he could get a copy of Matt’s book. 

So here’s a guy I work with every week.  That knows a shitload about my life.  That I’ve never met.  In Moscow.  That’s the world we live in today! 

And as weird as that sounds, this conversation with Matt resonated and made a connection.  Think about that.  You never know which conversation or which thing you do is going to make a connection.

So keep doing epic stuff and keep having conversations and

I will see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4418.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 1:19pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-416 – Nate Does Form

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4416.mp3]
Link epi4416.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-416 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Yes, I did that thing where I published two episodes out of order.  Last week was episode 417 and next week will be episode 418.

Today we wrap up our series on running form. We talk with Nate who commands the Run Experience in California and is an expert of form. 

You may hear some odd noises in the background towards the end of the interview.  I was trying to do too much and was walking the puppy in the woods behind my house at the same time I was interviewing Nate.  We got going a bit later than planned and I realized I had to get back to my house for another call.  I went off trail to take a shortcut. 

Anyhow. How are you folks doing.  Got some new members. In the last couple weeks.  When I ask them what I can do for them they say ‘just keep doing the podcast’ – I guess I can handle that.  Set’s the bar pretty low. 

I am sitting in my Cape Cod house.  In the morning I’m going to get up and drive over to Hyannis, catch the 6:10 highspeed ferry to Nantucket where I will pace the 1:50 pace group at the Nantucket half marathon. 

They were having trouble finding pacers.  1:50 is a little quicker than I would usually volunteer for, but they needed that more.  It shouldn’t be a problem.  It’s only a 8:23ish pace, and it’s only a ½ marathon distance.  Meh.  We’ll see if we have anyone looking for that pace. 

I’m not feeling great.  I took a couple weeks off after Beantown, but it didn’t help my sore butt at all.  It really hurts when I sit for a long while, which is basically the definition of my life.  I have Baystate next week but at this point I’m thinking about switching to the half because I have serious doubts about my fitness and ability to race.

I feel like my body is telling me to stop running for a while.  My thinking is to switch to some other fitness routine for the rest of the year and try to get my flexibility and core strength back.  I’m also loath to lose the fitness I’ve built up. 

I’d need to find something aerobic to replace the running.  When I took those two weeks off I did do a medium effort bike workout on the Peleton in the gym.  That still aggravated the whatever it is.  I guess I could swim but logistically that is such a pain.  I’d have to join a club, rebuy all the stuff, etc. 

I’d love to get into some sort of class that could give me the core strength and flexibility but I’m not confident I’d be able to find anything that fit me.  Cross fit?  Yoga classes?  I don’t know but I need to find something different.  I’m a bit rudderless. 

In section one we’ll wrap up our form discussion.  In section two I’m going to talk about brown rice.  Yeah, why not? 

Let me share a story I forgot to share last time from the Beantown marathon…

Late in the race, after I had crashed and was limping home I had something amusing happen.  It was a loop course so later in the race I was lapping the slower runners.

I passed a lady pushing a double stroller with two toddlers in it.  Good for her pushing two kids, I’m assuming her kids, for a marathon distance. 

As I pass the stroller and pull ahead one of the kids yells out “Dadda!” 

That gave me a chuckle.

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Finishing up on form - http://runrunlive.com/finishing-up-on-form

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Nate Helming

BIO:

Co-Founded The Run Experience in 2014 with the goal of reaching a broader audience of runners and outdoor enthusiasts who want to be able to run and enjoy the outdoors and remain injury-free. He has helped athletes finish their first races, conquer new distances, overcome pre-existing injuries, set new PRs, reach the podium, and qualify for national and world level events.

New Training App: (just launched this August)

https://therunexperience.com/app

Youtube Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TREtherunexperience/

Section two – On Brown Rice– http://runrunlive.com/on-brown-rice

Outro

Well, my friends, you have used that perfect form to stroll nonchalantly to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-416. 

I read a couple books this week.  I finished the David Goggins book, “Can’t Hurt Me”.  It was a decent read.  Very inspirational made you feel like you could do anything.  I didn’t see him, but he was out at Leadville.  He likes the ultra-running.  Likes to suffer. 

One of the things he talked about that I found useful was using your past successes as proof that you can do whatever new thing you’re attempting.  You make an invent tory of those times when you broke through and when you succeeded and you pull those out when things get hard.

I’m not in a great place in any of the aspects of my journey right now.  And it is useful for me to be able to go back through the inventory of all the amazing things I’ve been able to do in my life.  It gives me patience, and gratitude and even a bit of courage.  We all need courage.

The other book I read last week was “Flow my tears the policeman said” by Philip K Dick.  I found it in Starbucks.  They have a little basket of books that people leave and take.

If you’re listening to me you probably already know who Phillip K Dick is.  He was one of the most unique science fiction writers of our time.  You’ve seen his stories in the movies.  Most famously his story, “Do Android Dream of Electric Sheep” became the cult classic “Blade Runner” with Harrison Ford.  But also, “The man in the high castle”, “A Scanner Darkly”, “Minority Report”, “Total Recall” and “The Adjustment Bureau”. 

It’s hard to describe a PKD book.  They are all richly tailored alternate universes.  But, close enough to our own reality to make us uncomfortable.  I would recommend you read through his notable works.  This one won the Campbell award.  It was hilariously set in 1988 – which was 15 years in the future from where Dick was writing. 

The thing with PKD is that the themes are science fiction-y, but it’s more philosophical fiction.  It’s not all spaceships, ray guns and beautiful women.  The alternate universes are abstractions for him to ask very reasonable questions about unreasonable things and things that matter.

Nantucket in the morning.  BayState next weekend then slow things down for the winter months and try to get my kinks straightened out. 

Ollie the border collie is doing great. He’s still a terror.  He’s turning into a teenage.  He’s learning how to chase the ball and sometimes even bring it back.  He loves to run on the trails with me.  I run and he zooms around. 

He’s a good dog but he has way more energy than any of us do.  I take him to work with me sometimes and let him bother me there.  I have to go up and down 3 flights of stairs to walk through the basement to the loading dock to get him outside.  I suppose it’s god for both of us.  He’s making friends with the ladies in the smoking area. 

When I went to the dump this morning the lady there was asking where he was.  He’s such a cutie pie and loves everyone so much he draws a crowd wherever he goes.

That’s it for me.  I’m cooked and have to get up super early. 

Reach into that cookie jar of past achievements that you are proud of and

I will see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4416.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:55pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-417 – Robert Owen Hamilton – Beyond Average

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4417.mp3]
Link epi4417.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-417 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Welcome to all my endurance friends as the summer winds down up here in the northern hemisphere.  Maybe you’re wrapping up your season or deep into training for that last fall marathon. 

The September weather we’ve been having is more like August weather.  It’s been warm this week and dry for quite a while.  The days are getting precipitously short, it’s dark in the morning and dark in the afternoon and soon it will be dark all the time here in New England like the bottom of some deep, cold well with a small circle of sunlight at the top peeking in to signal the long lonesome memory of sunny days past and the long winter ahead. 

In the old, farming days this would be the time of plenty.  The crops are in the larders are full and the new beer and wine are fermenting.  This is the time of Thanksgiving and Oktoberfest.  Before the slow march into the winter solstice.  The ancients saw it, literally, as the death of the world. 

I have just started running again after taking two weeks off.  I came out of that last marathon really beat up and decided to give it a bit of a rest.  I looked back over the Spring and Summer and realized that I’ve run 10 races over the last few months.  It was what I wanted to do after spending so much time heads down training.  But it does leave you a bit beat up

I’ve been getting OllieDog the border collie puppy out with me more often as well.  He’s going to be a big dog.

Today we have an interview with Robert Hamilton Owens who reached out to me to talk about aging and fitness.  Robert is one of those guys with an agenda or passion.  His passion is convincing people that age is no excuse to not do stuff.  You can do more than you think. 

Robert has written a book and speaks on this topic.  He’s circulates in that hard core ‘we can do anything group’ with Joe DeSena from Spartan and David Goggins.  He is a retired Special Ops Pararescue guy.  He’s an ironman.  He’s had a TV show and been a minister.  He did that 7 marathons in 7 days thing with McGillivray last year.  He is known as ‘the fittest 66 year old in the world’. 

Most recently he went through the equivalent of the BUDS SEAL training Hell Week.  That’s the thing you see with them shivering in the surf and carrying logs around.  Interesting guy.  A bit of a force of nature.  The kind of guy you want on your side in a fight. 

One thing you may or may not notice is me getting a bit less interactive towards the end on the interview.  I had set myself up in a conference room to take the call and someone found me towards the end and was sitting there waiting for me to finish which kinda cramped my style.  That whole separating work from hobby thing again.

Today I decided to wrap the whole episode around the concepts of aging and what we are really capable of.  In section one I talk about what the current thinking is on age and fitness.  In section two we delve into that ‘giving more than you think you are capable of’ topic and try to weed out truth from magical thinking.  

That’s the question my friends.  How much more can you get out of yourself and why aren’t you getting it?  Can you live up to or beyond your potential?  Do you even want to?

Let’s find out.

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – The effect of age on fitness - http://runrunlive.com/the-boston-problem

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Robert Hamilton Owens

ABOUT ROBERT

https://www.roberthamiltonowens.com/about

Robert Hamilton Owens is a man of many hats. He’s been and done a lot – mountain climbing, radio and TV personality, keynote speaker, minister, Ironman, philanthropist, triathlete, Special Ops Pararescueman, and father of five – to name a few. But of all the pursuits he’s undertaken, there’s one title that best describes this literal force of nature: Robert is The Fittest 66-Year-Old in the World. Period.

Robert was born and raised in Orange County, California without ever having met his parents. Adopted by a California judge, Robert was raised as a special-needs child who was unable to play kickball with his classmate due to the corrective shoes he was required to wear through sixth grade.

In high school, Robert trained under legendary US Olympic swim coach Jon Urbanchek in Anaheim, and later raced outrigger canoes from Long Beach to Catalina with the Dana Point Outrigger Club on his off time from lifeguarding in San Clemente. 

In 1973, he entered the U.S. Air Force Special Operations School with a class of 157 men to train as a Pararescueman, the Air Force equivalent of a Navy SEAL. Of those 157, only seven made the through and graduated, one of which was Robert, who was designated Team Leader.

As an Air Force Pararescueman, Robert was routinely called upon to risk his life to rescue those in perilous situations, such as climbers stranded on Denali, the highest mountain in North America. As a climber himself, Robert later attempted a winter ascent up the mountain, making it nearly three quarters of the way up before being blown off by 80-mile-per-hour, -100-degree winds. But to his credit, and to Robert’s understanding to this day, no one has ever made it to the top in those conditions. After Robert left the military, he began smuggling literature into the old Soviet Union, and smuggling official documents back out. The documents were violations of the Helsinki Peace Accords under the Carter administration.

Robert Hamilton Owens

In total, Robert has completed 12 Ironman Triathlons – from Florida to Oahu to South Africa – and is one of the few Ironmen to complete both Honolulu in 1980 as well as Kona in 2003. “My goal is to be the longest active Ironman in the world,” he says. The 140.6-mile Ironman (2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride and 26.3-mile run, all done without a break) is among the shorter competitions Robert’s put himself through. At age 65 he embarked on the 238 mile “300 of Sparta Endurance Race,” an eight-day endurance race in Greece to help raise over $315,000 for the families of fallen Navy SEAL contractors who died at Benghazi. A mere four days before his 66th birthday, Robert took on the SEALFIT’s Kokoro 50-Hour Challenge, originally created to train Special Operations Candidates. He was the oldest of the group by 25 years to finish, and at the same time became the oldest to ever complete the challenge, for which he was awarded the “Most Advanced Age Ever Award” by SEALFIT. And then without any training, he took on the Ironman Mexico – his 12th Ironman. And in January, 2018, Robert took on and completed "The World Marathon Challenge – 7 Marathons 7 Continents 7 Days.”

But for Robert, a father of five, none of this is done for self-aggrandizement. While he loves the challenge, he derives his greatest pleasure from helping others – motivating, educating, and inspiring them. He does it for one, such as helping a ready-to-quit Ironman competitor and cancer survivor to continue and finish the race, and he does it for many.

For more than 25 years, Robert has been speaking before audiences as large as 50,000, from San Diego to Moscow on motivational and leadership topics. His past clients include the Navy SEALs, New York Jets, The Baltimore Ravens, The Philadelphia Eagles, South African Parliament, the Vietnamese Department of Foreign Affairs, and the Philippines Joint Chiefs of Staff. He’s been invited to address the South African Parliament, and has made five trips teaching officials in the Vietnamese Department of Foreign Affairs. During 22 of those years, he hosted the regional Fox network television program “Leadership for Changing Times” in Reno, Nevada where, by two separate Governor’s appointments, he also served for eight years on the Nevada State Judicial Ethics Committee.

While it takes extraordinary physical condition to be in the Air Force Special Ops or to best the many Ironmans he’s bested, Robert will readily affirm that success in these physical endeavors – and in life in general – is as much a matter of will and mental attitude as it is physical conditioning. When most have long since slowed as they approach their golden years, The Fittest 66-Year-Old in the World continues to routinely take on unprecedented challenges, and to help others see what can be achieved in their own lives.

 

Section two – 40% more– http://runrunlive.com/you-think-too-much

Outro

Well, my friends, You have used your willpower to rise above the limitations of age and poor thinking to strive valiantly, giving 140% to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-417. 

Since we talked I took some time off.  I was really beat up after that BeanTown marathon try.  I shut it down for the better part of two weeks.  I started up again this week.  The tendonitis in my butt still hurts but I feel relatively fit. 

I’ve only got a couple weeks of training before I have to taper for BayState.  We’ll see what I can do but I’m not mortgaging the house on this one.  I counted up the races I ran this summer and it turns out there were somewhere around 10.  That’s a lot for an old boy. 

They released the statistics for Boston today.  Even with making the cutoffs 5 minutes faster you would have needed to beat the qualification standard by 1:39 to get in for 2020, or about 3200 runner who qualified and didn’t get in.  It’s a brave new world. 

I’ll tell you a couple Ollie dog stories to take you out.  I’m getting tried and I need to wrap this up. 

First, I had him out yesterday on a trail run with me.  My day got hosed so I couldn’t get out until it was almost dark and it was pissing rain.  There’s a point, about 3 miles in where it opens up and you can get to the pond off of the trail.  There’s an opening.  I usually stop here to let the dog drink or swim, not this dog, the last dog, Buddy. 

I pulled out to the opening and told Ollie to go get a drink.  Now, this late in the day, with a full heavy rain going, the surface of the pond looked solid as a cement floor.  He went running into it as if he wa going to run out onto this floor pretty much full tilt scamper…and went right under.  He was quite surprised and managed to dog paddle himself back to dry land. 

This morning I got up and he had been sick.  He left me a fairly disgusting mess in his crate.  I toweled him off and took his blanket out.  I carried the hard-plastic liner out and hosed it off outside.  I went upstairs and through the towel and blanket in the washer and turned it on.  That’s how my day started. 

Then my wife gets up and starts yelling at me for running the washing machine at 6:00 AM!  I explained the situation and she asks me one of those questions that I can’t answer.  “Did he eat anything he wasn’t supposed to?”  He’s a 4-month old, high-energy, border collie pup.  If he’s awake he’s trying to eat something and it’s usually something he’s not supposed to. 

That’s it.  I’ve reverted to being a beginner parent again.  My life is wrapped around picking up bodily fluids and trying to keep my young friend from killing himself.  I’m not sure I’m equipped for it anymore!

May the gods lend me patience.

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4417.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 1:32pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-415 – Kate Williams – Yaks and the Planet

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4415.mp3]
Link epi4415.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-415 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Today we have a great conversation with Kate who is the CEO of 1% for the planet.  I owe you a bit of backstory here, so try to keep up.  When I first started the podcast 11 years or so ago I was a bit worried about mixing my professional world with my running world.  I’m a pragmatist.  I made the decision early on that if the podcast ever caused conflict with my regular career the regular career would win.  I had this nightmare scenario of sitting in a board meeting and someone saying “You had time to do this stupid marathon race report, explain to us why you missed your numbers again?”

As an insider to our endurance lifestyles I get it.  I know what we do is additive to our careers.  What we do doesn’t make us worse at our day jobs it makes us better.  I believe that.  But my beliefs weren’t what I was worried about.  It’s like the old joke about marriage; “Would you rather be right, or be happy?”  I would rather be able to pay my bills than be sanctimonious.

I was never that guy.  Because no one at work gives a crap about your training or your marathon times. 

I built a wall between what I did for a living and my podcast adventures.  Which confused and intrigued my listeners.  Here I am talking about airplanes and board meetings and hotel stays and clients, and never sharing what I actually did for a living. 

I would get questions.  What do you do for a living?  So, I made something up that fit the evidence.  I told everyone that I was a contract killer (that explained all the travel), but that my cover job was a yak farmer.  And if you have the patience to go back and listen to those early episodes you’ll find all the yak farming jokes. 

Here’s the thing, I have never even seen a live yak.  I just randomly picked the most absurd profession I could think of. 

Fast forward to a couple weeks ago.  I was in LinkedIn doing whatever it is you do in LinkedIn and I came across Kate’s profile.  Here is this out-doorsy, masters runner person with an ivy league education and one of the jobs on her resume is “Yak Farmer”. 

I could not resist.  I reached out to her and got her on for this interview.  Which turned out to be apropos and extremely beneficial because she leads an organization that addresses the intersection of business and the environment – a topic that I have done much rumination on. 

Why can’t we be business friendly and environmentally friendly at the same time?  Why are those two things antithetical? 

I think you’ll like our conversation and I’m grateful that this silly podcast thing has led me to engage with another outstanding individual who I would have never otherwise had the opportunity to meet. 

In section one I’m going to ruminate on the Boston Marathon some more. In section two I’m going to ruminate about rumination. 

And, I hope you enjoyed my attempt to be funny with the Leadville race report.  Sorry for the salty language.  Hope the kids weren’t listening. 

To make up for it I’ll give you a Dad joke.  What kind of animal do you need to take with you on a trip to the Himalayas? 

A Yak of all trades…

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – The Boston Problem - http://runrunlive.com/the-boston-problem

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Kate Williams, CEO

https://www.onepercentfortheplanet.org/about

Kate Williams is CEO of 1% for the Planet, a global movement inspiring businesses and individuals to support environmental nonprofit solutions, through annual membership and everyday actions. Last year, the network of 1800 members in more than 40 countries gave $24+million to environmental nonprofits.

Kate stepped into her role at 1% for the Planet in May 2015 bringing a strong track record as a leader:  Professionally, Kate served as Executive Director of the Northern Forest Canoe Trail and as founder and owner of the Vermont Yak Company prior to starting at 1% for the Planet. In addition, Kate served on the Board of the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) for eleven years, two as chair. Kate has also served on the boards of the Northern Forest Center and Shelburne Farms (current), and served as an elected member of the Town of Waitsfield Select Board, serving three years a chair of that board.

Kate earned a BA at Princeton University where she majored in history, and an MS at the MIT Sloan School of Management where she focused on organizational systems. Kate is a master’s distance runner and kitchen gardener. Kate lives in Waitsfield with her husband and two children.

Links would be to our website:

MISSION

We bring dollars and doers together to accelerate smart environmental giving

ORIGIN

Ever wonder how 1% for the Planet began?

It all started when two businessmen met and bonded over their shared love for the outdoors. Realizing their responsibility to protect our planet, they decided to give 1% of their sales back to the environment—whether or not they were profitable.

 

In 2002, Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia, and Craig Mathews, founder of Blue Ribbon Flies, created 1% for the Planet and started a global movement.

 

 “The intent of 1% for the Planet is to help fund these diverse environmental organizations so that collectively they can be a more powerful source in solving the world’s problems.”

— YVON CHOUINARD IN HIS BOOK “LET MY PEOPLE GO SURFING”

 

Soon after our inception, 1% for the Planet’s mission began to resonate across the globe. The idea was simple: because companies profit from the resources they take from the earth, they should protect those resources. Realizing their responsibility, brands such as Brushfire Records, Klean Kanteen, New Belgium Brewing, Honest Tea, Caudalie and many more followed suit to join the movement.

 

Our network is global and diverse, proving that anyone can make a difference. From the individual members who give back by donating to and volunteering with local environmental nonprofits to singer-songwriter Jack Johnson, who joined our network in 2004 to protect the shores of his home state of Hawaii—everyone has a 1%.

 

We connect our members with high-impact nonprofit partners that align with their values and add to their brand story. In doing so, we take the time to get to know what’s really important to our members. Through our partnership advising process, we learned that member, Klean Kanteen cares deeply about a myriad causes, which include connecting young people to the wonder and science of our world through environmental education. Beginning in 2008, Klean Kanteen's support of NatureBridge is one of our longest-standing partnerships.

 

Today, we have more than 2,000 members, in over 45 countries, coming together to protect the future of our planet.

 

Section two – The Ruminating Brain– http://runrunlive.com/you-think-too-much

Outro

Well, my friends, ruminated to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-415, which is a small miracle. 

Two weeks after Leadville I went ahead and ran the Wapack Trail 18 miler.  I couldn’t stop myself.  I had a perfectly reasonable plan.  I would do a couple hard weeks with speedwork and then treat Wapack as a long training run. 

This was a wonderful idea on paper, but not so much in execution.  What I had not considered is that going into a technical trail mountain race like Wapack with tired legs result in spending a lot of time with your face in the dirt.  Yeah, If you don’t lift your toes you eat dirt.  I probably fell 7 times.

Then I shut it down hoping for a big bounce for the BeanTown Marathon last weekend. 

I felt pretty fit and strong for the race but I only had 18 miles in me. I raced hard and hung in as long as I could but I just didn’t have the legs.  Duh.  It was a 6 loop course in a park, by the ocean in southern Mass.  Pretty course with some gravel roads and a little hill in each loop.  That little hill started really getting to me by the 4th loop and I just couldn’t hold the pace.

Another classic Chris Russell 15 minute positive split. 18 miles at race pace and 8 more at a stumble.  I’m not terribly upset about it because I felt like I was close.  These last few cycles I haven’t made my time but every one of them felt like they could have gone either way.

Next up for me is Baystate.  I’m chilling this week to recover.  I was super beat up after this race. I’ve got a very sore hip and still have that tendonitis in my butt.  If I can get healthy I’ll load up on the long runs for a couple weeks and get some speedwork in.  The challenge is going to be staying healthy. I can tell I’m a bit over trained. 

And, now, I’m officially out of qualification.  If I want to run Boston this year I’ll need a waver bib.

Oh, and I signed up to pace another half marathon.  I’m going down to Nantucket with Gary two weeks before Baystate to pace the 1:50 group with him.  Should be pretty. And that’s a good two-weeks-out workout for a marathon. 

As usual, I’m hopeful and still plugging away, but I’m only in my first year of this age group so I’ve got to qualify 3 more times at this level before I age up 10 minutes.

And what about Ollie-dog?  He is growing like a weed.  As I was writing this he was crying to go out.  I just came back in so I figured he was just bored. But, as all good puppies do, he proceeded to march into the living room and show the rug that he did indeed really need to go out.  Good thing we haven’t got around to changing the carpet yet. 

He’s a maniac.  When he’s not chewing on you he’s stealing something of yours to chew on.  He like ice cubes and anything he is not supposed to have.  He’s going to be a great dog if I can ever break him.  Right now he’s a wild animal. 

It’s nice to have the pitter patter of little hooves in the house again.  

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4415.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:29pm EDT

Leadville, 2019

Call me a schadenfreude asshole but the moment that stands out from this adventure was watching Eric throw up for the first time in his ultra career, just after we left the Hopeless aid station.  That’s the first point where I thought I was actually adding value.  Until that point I felt like a bit of a third wheel, maybe some poorly chosen window dressing for Eric’s 8th LT100. 

But, right then as he tried to yawn a toxic combination of noodles and electrolyte drink into the bushes, I felt like I was needed, like there was work to be done.

And who doesn’t like to be needed?

Chapter One: Anticipation

Eric asked me to pace him at the Leadville Trail 100 some time around the beginning of the year, 6 -7 months ago.  He caught me at a low point.  That ebb in activity where the fall race season is behind you and the spring training hasn’t started yet.  A time when summer is as far off as old age used to be. That mid-winter blue period. The doldrums of the year.  A time when I wallow in manic depression without the so much of themania. 

He knew I’d be weak. 

You may have heard of the Leadville Trail 100 ultra-marathon.  “The race across the sky”.  It was established in the early 1980’s as a secret government program to harness the psychic energy of ex-drug addicts, by making them suffer at altitude for hours on end.  Then the iron curtain rusted, the wall fell, and Vladimir Putin started posing for romance novel covers.  They had to make up a cover story about saving the town of Leadville from imminent demise from the abrupt closure of the Climax mine. 

The fun thing about Leadville, and here I use the term ‘fun’ to mean ‘awful’, is that it sits at an altitude approximately 200 meters south of the moon’s orbit.  It’s a place where only a few thimble fulls of oxygen reach and those few thimbles have to be shared among everyone in town and a few dozen shaggy mountain goats.  It’s known for its rough Western setting, it’s panoramic scenic mountain vistas and spontaneous nosebleeds … right before you pass out. 

As we came into the summer and the event started getting closer it began to dawn on me that maybe this wasn’t a good idea.  It’s one of those things that seems like a really good idea 6 months in the future where it can’t harm you but starts to get gnarly looking as it comes into focus in time. 

Eric casually mentioned that one of his pacers was in Europe for a wedding and the other one was hurt, so, hey, I’m going to need you for 39 miles.  Wait, what?  39 miles, at altitude, in the middle of the night?  That’s terrifying.

So I did what I usually do and didn’t train for it.  Well, I mean I was just rolling out of a stout effort at Boston, and in general maintain a pretty solid level of fitness, but 39 miles at altitude is an ultra-marathon. 

I live at about 250 feet above sea level.  Hope Pass is 12,600 feet above sea level.  You do the math, unless you’re actually on Hope Pass because you won’t be able to do math at that altitude, but, yeah that’s two miles straight up. 

The highest I’ve ever been is Denver and that’s 1 mile up.  Hope Pass is 2 miles up.  Again, math-wise, twice as up.  Here’s the thing they don’t tell you, until you get there and it’s too late, then they tell you because they think it’s funny, the oxygen content in the air is not linear.

At sea level, where I (and all the bright people) live, the oxygen content is 20.9%.  Where we were running it was in the 12-13% range.  42% less oxygen.  Just a reminder, humans need oxygen to do things, like breathe, run, and stay alive. 

I had visions of me bent over coughing up blood by the side of the trail while Eric ran on. 

I read a race report from the Leadville trail Mountain bike 100 held a couple weeks previously from a guy my age.  He had a small stroke at the top of one of the passes and the mean old race officials made him stop racing when he was slurring his words.  He was pretty sure his racing days were over. 

On the minus side of the ledger:

  • I had not trained well
  • I had never been at this altitude, let alone run at this altitude
  • My head might explode
  • I might give out on my runner – which is very bad form

On the plus side

  • I have a lot of trail running and mountain racing experience
  • I was picking him up at 50 miles so he was already cooked when I got him
  • I’m pretty good at suffering when I need to be
  • This is just the sort of stupid shit that turns my crank, so to speak…

Chapter Two: Getting there

I flew from Boston to Denver on Thursday afternoon.  The race is on, well it’s one of those stupid ultra things, the runners start on Saturday Morning at 4:00 AM and have to finish by 10:00 Am on Sunday.  It’s a 30 hour cut off.  Which sounds generous but less than 50% of the people who start this race finish.  A majority of those miss the cutoffs at some point on the course. 

Flying into Denver is unique.  I’ve done a lot of flying.  When you fly into Orlando it’s all screaming kids with mouse ears.  When you fly into Vegas it’s all drunk people in cowboy hats.  When you fly into LaGuardia it’s all close-talking loud people shouting at cell phones. 

On most flights through the Midwest I get squeezed between corn-fed mid westerners who take up most of my personal space with their MAGA hats and over-stretched golf shirts.  Or, perhaps a California flight with that crazy woman that wants to talk to me about her vitamin regime. 

Not the flight into Denver. 

Everyone on the plane is an endurance athlete of some form.  Even the children.  On the one hand it’s quite spacious with all the skinny people, but on the other hand if I had to resort to cannibalism, they looked a bit gristly.  But, if I did have to resort to cannibalism I’d start with the vegans, because I think that would be ironic. 

If we did crash, I’d be all set.  You could not hope for better seat mates.  I’m sure they could carry me out of the plane and up a mountain while devising intricate splints and tourniquets from spare tent pieces and technical fabric scrounged from those North Face backpack carry ons.  Maybe shoot some rapids in a kayak assembled from air sickness bags on the way back to civilization. 

Eric and crew fetched me at the airport.  I felt like an adopted child being picked up by the new parents.I have hung out with this crew before and they are a blast to do an event with.  We did the New Orleans marathon in 20014 and it’s one of my favorite race memories. 

Eric, his wife, Dan his best friend and other pacer, and Dan’s wife.  We would round up the crew with Eric’s son, Eric’s son’s wife, who was also pacing and one of Eric’s son’s friends, who was the other pacer.

To formalize his relationship (sort of an indentured servitude type of relationship) with the Leadville Trail 100 Eric bought a house in Breckenridge, which would be race HQ for the weekend.  I had a room at a Breck hotel a mile away. 

Breckinridge is a nice town in a Stepford Wives sort of way.  You sort of feel like you’re on a movie set and it’s all not quite real.  But that could have been the total lack of usable oxygen making it to my cerebral cortex. 

At the hotel I was on the 6th floor.  I’ll tell you a Colorado story.  I was walking to the elevator and there was a young dad behind me with a 5 or six year old.  I was going to let that kid press the button in the elevator. But they marched right be me and into the stairwell. I figured they must be on the next floor up or something. 

When I was existing the elevator, they were trooping down the hallway in front of me.  Really? It’s Colorado! We don’t need elevators!  We don’t’ need stairs!  Just put in a climbing wall and we’ll belay our luggage up from base camp.

Pass me a piton.  Belay on! 

Chapter Three: Camp Foreshadow

As a walked over to the base camp house early Friday morning I passed a guy out on the sidewalk having a morning smoke.  As we exchanged pleasantries about the beautiful morning, I thought to myself that this guy is going to get mugged by a gang of high-altitude hipsters.  I figured he’d be pilloried on an extra mountain bike frame when I came back by.  If Smokie the Bear didn’t get him first. 

I consciously chose to walk the less-then-a-mile through the bad streets of Breckenridge just to see how the altitude felt.  Would I be gasping for breath?  Would my muscles be screaming for oxygen?  Would my head explode?

Turns out the answer to all this hyperbole was, “No.”  I felt fine.  Well I felt altitude fine.  Which from my time in Denver feels a bit like a three-beer hangover combined with a bit of an allergy. 

We collected the tribe and drove over to Leadville, through Frisco and a valley where the headwaters of the Arkansas River begins, to eventually empty into the Mississippi. 

The whole place is drop dead scenic.  The Rocky Mountains rise up on all sides with their 13,000 and 14.000 peaks.  There was still snow in places.  With the thin air the mountains pop out at you like some ultra-real Instagram filter, their crags and points crisp and sharp in the lasering sun. 

It’s just an interesting place, Leadville.  There was an apocalyptic novel written in 2008 where Leadville becomes the new capital of the United States called “Plague Years”. It’s got a ton of history and character.  You take all that and pour several hundred near-psychotic ultra-runners on top and you’ve got a party. 

It turns out that, after his 7 straight Leadville finishes Eric is pretty much the Mayor of Leadville.  Everywhere we went he would be embraced by emaciated trail ghosts.  There was much back slapping, handshaking and hugging.  I think he has a good chance in the upcoming election.

We attended the pre-race briefing which is a bit of theatre.  The long-time race directors all standup and give inspirational talks.  It’s a wonderful, feel-good, almost family reunion feel.  The Ultra-running community is very close.  Almost everyone has a backstory.  There are recovering addicts and abuse victims.  All those lost souls who can only find peace deep in the dark place out on the trails. 

Made me wonder what dark secrets Eric was harboring to drive him into this carnival of lost souls.  I’m going to go with dressing up in women’s underwear and dancing around, just because the visual cracks me up.

From the briefing we wandered over to the expo, which was a small, open-air affair. They had everything you would expect at an event like Leadville; commemorative shirts, extra nutrition, handmade backpacks crafted from organically harvested Koala foreskins.  And as much CBD as you could carry. 

Eric and his son grabbed their stuff, more hugs, more selfies and we commuted back to the ranch. 

Wonderful news for me was that Dan’s knee was feeling better and he’d pick up Eric a bit earlier on the course. Instead of 39 miles, I’d only have to survive 27. Piece of cake. 

We had a nice dinner, a couple beers and everyone got an early bedtime.  They would be getting up early to be there for the 4:00 AM start.  The rest of us would sleep in and head over to catch them as they came through Twin Lakes in the early afternoon, then pop over to the turnaround, 50-mile mark at Winfield.

Chapter Four: Wait for it.

Much of Friday was spent by the runners running the Leadville course.  Much of the day for us was spent waiting. Waiting for them to come through Twin Lakes.  Waiting in line for the buses over to Winfield.  Then lying around in the sun at Winfield waiting some more. 

The weather was wonderful for waiting.  A little warm for running.  I ended up with a bit of a sunburn before the day was over.  While I was getting ready, I realized my water pack had sprung a leak and had to do a quick tape-job on my bladder to fix it. I’ve had that pack for a long time and it’s starting to show.

I would pick him up at the Winfield aid station which is the turnaround point for the out and back, about 50 miles in. 

Dan, Eric’s best friend and long-time pacer had the last 7 of Eric’s races in a big spreadsheet.  We partially knew what to expect.  Eric has a history of falling down early in this race. Last year he broke his nose.  He decided this year to go out slower in the early sections to avoid rolling in the dirt so much and keep the blood inside his body.

Because of this go out slower strategy and the warmer day he was late coming into Winfield.  Now Eric is as calm as a cucumber on a cool day.  A real machine.  The whole time I was with him he was lucid, forming whole sentences and moving well.  Which is not an easy thing to do after 60-70 miles at altitude. 

I on the other hand was still a bit terrified.  I still didn’t know if I’d be able to perform at altitude.  I knew we were close to the cutoffs.  And my equipment was acting up.  But, on the plus side I had my runner and the game was on.  I had a job.  Eric knew what he was doing but I was there to make sure he stayed on track and drag him through any rough spots.

Chapter Five: Up and Over.

And so, it began.  At 5:25 PM Eric and I fast walked out of the Winfield Aid station and made our way towards Hope pass.  This is a mountain pass, which is a saddle between two mountains, that tops out at 12,600 feet.  Eric had already been up and over once.  Now we were going back.

This is a tough climb at a tough point in the race.  The runners are already 50+ miles in and they already know what they are up against, having just done it.  It’s a psychologically hard place for the runners.  On the bright side, they get to pick up a pacer for the return trip.  Eric had me. 

My plan was to just try to keep up.  Keep him engaged as much as possible.  Keep an eye on him.  And periodically remind him to eat and drink.  I bit like a mother hen or a border collie.

Our approach out of Winfield towards the pass was a beautiful single path through an Aspen grove.  Not easy running, but nothing out of the ordinary.  We passed through places where avalanches had cleared the slopes of trees and piled things up.  The single path hugged the side of the mountain with precipitous drops off the side of the trail.  It was a delightful afternoon. 

The whole time we were climbing towards the pass runners were passing us coming in the other direction.  We would tell them “Good Work!” and such but we knew they were ‘dead men (and women) walking’.  We were tight on the cutoff there was not much chance these stragglers were going to see the finish line.  

I believe the race intentionally makes the cutoffs tight early to sort people out before they get hurt.  There is a lot of attrition after the first trip over Hope Pass and even more on the way back.  It doesn’t seem hard on paper.  You’re only trying to hit 3 miles an hour, but the pass and the altitude mess with people.  It get’s into their heads.  Especially the second trip up and over. 

As we began to climb, I pulled my phone and turned on some Grateful Dead to pass the time.  I had this fantasy vision that my music would attract a van-load of old hippies who had been hiding in the woods since the 60’s.  They’d come out smoking joints and dancing and they’d joined us on the trail. 

That didn’t happen.  When we got to a flat or a down, we’d run a few strides, but for most of that climb Eric was just grinding away trying to hike as best he could.

I was feeling good.  The altitude scare passed, and I was able to keep up and even get out front and pace a bit.  We were grinding out maybe 2 miles an hour.  It was single path, rocky trail at 15 – 20 % grade.  Just putting your head down and pushing those quads up one step at a time.

I remembered from the Burning River last year when Kevin was pacing me, and I was pretty shot at the end.  He would stay ahead of me like a carrot on a stick and make me keep up.  I tried to do that with Eric.  I could hear his hiking sticks clacking on the rocks behind me so I knew where he was and tried to stay just out of reach. 

It took us awhile to clear the tree line.  Then we could see the pass.  And all around us the mountains rose like gods.  It was stunningly gorgeous in the late afternoon sun. 

As we got into the switch backs on the final push the temperature started to drop.  I had been super comfortable in the 65-degree, dry sunny afternoon, but now the wind kicked up above the tree line and we stopped to fish out some gear. I remember saying to Eric as we climbed the pass “It had better get cold because I’m going to be pissed if I had to carry all this winter gear and don’t use it.”

I got my gloves on and a fleece beanie for the summit.  I was wearing my Brooks baggie shorts with a pair of Zensa Calf sleeves for added protection and a tech T shirt with my water backpack.  I brought with me a running jacket. 

As we approached the summit, I got Eric’s video camera and scrambled ahead to take some video of him crossing the pass.  I felt the altitude.  Not so much in my legs and lungs, but in my head.  My red blood cells were holding an emergency impeachment meeting to vote my brain out of office. 

The whole time at altitude for me is like a combination of a 3-4 beer hangover and a spring pollen allergy.  A fuzzy head, dry sinuses, a little cough.  I brought a bit of an airplane cough with me but the dry altitude seemed to dry it up.  One thing I loved was no chaffing.  With the lack of humidity I never got sticky enough to lose any skin. 

And just like after about a couple hours of climbing we were up and over. 

Eric went blowing by me not pausing long at the pass.  I had my pack off putting on my jacket and finding my lights.  No time to waste.  I’d have to catch up.  He was on a mission.  In the same way that having the pass in front of you messes with your mind, having it behind you give you wings.

Eric was a machine. That’s why he’s finished this race 8 times now.  He just keeps moving.

This was to be his modus operandi. It didn’t matter what was going on around him he kept moving.  At one point we passed a guy who was down and out on the trail with people gathered around tending to him.  Eric didn’t even pause we just went chugging by like this poor bastard roadkill was a rock or branch.  I think they ended up helicoptering that guy out. 

While I was on the pass struggling into my jacket the sun was setting.  It was even worse now because we were on the other side of the mountain from the sun.  It got dark in a hurry. 

As I was fishing out my headlamp and flashlight in the dusk there a guy asked me if I had an extra light?  I said, well I have my runner’s extra light but that’s for my runner…  He says, “I’ll give you $100 for it.”  I don’t think he actually had $100 on him; I think he just wanted me to understand the urgency of the situation.  I relented and gave him Eric’s extra headlamp. He put Eric’s bib number into his phone.  Far as I know that headlamp hasn’t shown up again. 

Now I had to catch Eric who had taken off running down the mountain.  I put some coal in the boiler and started making way, happy to be done with the whole Hope Pass thing without incident.  We actually had to run through a patch of snow, left over from the previous winter.  No kidding.  Slipping and sliding through the snow at 12,000 feet in the feeble, failing dusk, trying not to superman as I was trying to catch Eric. 

One thing you have to know about Eric.  He’s very tall.  Probably 8 inches taller than me with legs to match. He eats up a lot of ground.  When we were hiking, I’d have to run a little to keep up with him. 70 miles in he’s walking faster than I can walk.  He thought I was trying to get him to run.  I was just trying to keep up. 

Chapter Six: All Night Long.

Coming out of the pass the first landmark is the Hopeless aid station.  We paused there to refill our tanks.  I was wearing a pack and carrying a bottle.  We’d shoot Gu’s every so often on the trail and then browse what was on offer at the aid stations.  I made sure to be aggressive with the Enduroyltes under the unsupported theory that the electrolytes would help my head in the thin air. 

We grabbed some hot broth and noodles.  Eric remixed his backpack with the Sword energy stuff he was using.  We pressed on. 

Next thing I know he’s retching off the trail behind me.  I guess the Sword didn’t mix well and he got a super strong mouthful of it on top of the noodles, and, 15 hours of running, and it wanted to come back up. 

I told him keep moving.  If you’re going to throw up, throw up and we’ll keep moving.  You’re going to feel shitty either way, so keep moving.  He managed to get the offending admixture up and out and we forged on.  We had the downhill now and could make some time.  We had to be back into Twin Lakes by 10:00 PM and it was tight.

We were good time on the back side of the pass.  By this time, with the dry air and the hundreds of runners the trail was super dusty.  You could see the dust in your headlamp and taste the grit in your mouth.  I was coughing a lot and losing my voice.

Which did not keep me from singing. 

We were see-sawing with another runner and his pacer. I started singing West Texas Cowboys (because of the one line about dusty dirt) and the other pacer knew the words and was belting out the song with me. I felt great.  We were having fun and Eric was keeping up.  I don’t know if it was my imagination but I felt like there was palpably more oxygen as we descended that dusty trail, dancing through the occasional rock garden.

I’d try to hold my flashlight beam on anything that looked treacherous so Eric could get a good fix on it coming down behind me.  I’ll call out the obstacles when I could, “Toe Grabbers!”, “Rock Garden”.

At one point off the side of the trail the moon was rising over the lakes and it was blood red.  An awesome sight.  Dripping that blood red reflection into the lake between the mountains. 

This is also where we passed Eric’s son Zach and his wife.  Zach was having some sort of stomach issue and had stopped running.  We tried to get him to come with us, but his head wasn’t in it, so we forged on. 

Coming into Twin Lakes there were 5 – 7 open water crossings. They had a wet year so there was more water. We splashed through these.  Some were cold and knee-deep. Some were disturbingly warmer and muddy and knee deep.  I only had one pair of shoes with me, but they were trail shoes and I was pretty sure they’d drain out and be ok.

Eric knew where we were and could smell the barn, so to speak.  He started to hammer through the water obstacles and was running hard through the fields to the Aid Station.  I pulled in behind him and let him drag me in. 

As we got close there was a lot of foot traffic. It was a bit confusing and crowded and dark.  Dan met us as we were coming in and told us to hustle to the timing mat because we were tight on time.  The three of us pushed through the crowd in the dark.

I was accidently body slamming people in the trail because, they were wandering in crowding the course, I was trying to keep one eye on Eric, it was dark and I was trying to figure out where the finish line was with some urgency. 

We made the cutoff by 8 minutes.  Which was a good thing, but also got me to worrying about the next cutoff and making up some time with my athlete being 60+ miles in.

The crew got Eric into a chair took care of his needs while I tried to clean all the sand and gravel out of my shoes from the water crossings. 

We topped off our tanks and got back on the trail.  We had work to do.  It was just after 10:00PM local time and midnight on Boston clock.  Eric had been going for 17 hours and I had had him for 5 of those.  We had to get to the next cutoff at Half Pipe by 1:15 AM.  Less than 10 miles but on this course you never know.

There was lot of fire road and a lot of climbing up out of twin lakes.  Everyone talks about Hope Pass but not so much about how there is another mountain to climb out of Twin Lakes. We worked it.  We were making time and catching runners.  Eric continued to be a machine.  It was all work now.  Deep into the night.

This was where I decided Eric was a robot.  He kept telling details about the course as we were coming up on them. “There’s a little hill here, then a downhill switch backs with rocks.” We’re coming up on 70 miles for him and he knows exactly where he is, he’s lucid, and he’s moving well. Definitely a robot.

We got into a nice rhythm on the downhills and flats.  I stayed out in front and set the cadence.  It’s an old ultra-running trick.  You count out 12 strides at a run, then count out 12 strides at a hike.  It keeps you focused on moving without over working anything.  I kept just far enough ahead to keep him engaged and moving. 

We made it into Half Pipe with time to spare. Frankly I wasn’t looking at my watch much anymore, we were just focused on moving and letting the course take care of itself.  We had 3hours and 15 minutes to get there, we did it in 2:42 and picked up 20 minutes on the cutoff.

I was getting tired coming into Half Pipe.  I had some waves of Nausea on the trail and was totally disappointed that it was only gas.  I thought for sure I was going to get dropped.  I figured I should it the porta john at Half Pipe just to be sure. 

They had them helpfully rigged with lights inside and not so helpfully absent any toilet paper, but we make do.  When I took my pack off I realized that I had worked up a good sweat coming down the mountain and the cold air on my wet body sent me quickly into chills.  It was cold!  I got some hot broth in the tent and cuddled up to the gas heater for a few minutes.

Eric was ready to go again and told him we’d have to keep moving because I was on the edge of hypothermia. With only 8 ½ more miles to Outbound where I would hand him off to Dan I figured I could tough it out.  I was suffering a bit, nothing awful, but with the altitude and the cold I was at the edge of my training.

The course was relatively easy in this section and we just kept up a good cadence and kept moving.  We were still passing a lot of runners. Eric was asking for the time. I didn’t want to roll up my sleeve to look at my watch because I didn’t want to lose the heat so I just told him to never mind and keep moving.

We got that good, steady run-hike cadence going again and were making good time.  I had to drop him by 3:00 AM local time, which would be 5:00 AM my time. All good.

With about 5K left we were cutting through a farm field and were treated to a wonderful visual, a bit of true performance art.  A runner was reliving himself in a great golden arc by the spotlight of his head lamp. It was like a water feature you’d expect to see in a Venetian fountain. We congratulated and applauded.

And that was it for me.  We pushed down a section of open road and across a field that seemed to go on forever.  My lights were dying and I was having trouble staying on the trail on the field.  We pushed into the outbound aid station and I tagged off to Dan. I gave him the update.  Eric was doing great.  He was eating and drinking and performing other bodily functions with reassuring regularity. 

Duty done I collapsed into a chair with my teeth chattering from the cold and tried to disappear into a space blanket.  We had picked up some more time and Eric and Dan had a good 40+ minute cushion to work with. 

My watch said I had run almost exactly 27 miles in almost exactly 9 hours for almost exactly 3 miles an hour.  Eric’s crew bundled me into the car with the heat on to give me ride back to the hotel for a hot shower couple hours of napping. 

Eric and Dan pressed on into the morning.

Chapter Seven: Aftermath.

I got a couple hours sleep and then headed back over to base camp to join the rest of the crew.  We drove over to Leadville trying to figure out from Dan’s text messages how close Eric was to the 30-hour cut off.  It looked like it was going to be close and we prepared for the worst.

I got some hot coffee and oatmeal and we waited by the road on a warm, sunny Leadville morning watching the happy parade of exhausted runners come up the street wit their crews in celebration.

And sure enough, with 20 minutes left on the clock Eric and Dan came up the street and there was much rejoicing. We all ran him in.  He was like a happy drunk.  He just finished his 8th Leadville Trail 100 Race on his 59th birthday on a day where only 42% of the people who started made it home. 

It’s a beautiful, terrible race that gives back to its runners more than it takes in the end.  It fills them with a satisfaction of having faced this terrible, beautiful course across the sky and walked away, sometimes with a belt buckle, always with a bucket of memories. 

Thank you, Eric. 

That was something to be part of.  If memories and experiences are the currency of our lives then I am a very rich man. 

Direct download: Leadville2019.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 6:59pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-414 – Matt Part 2 – The Ironman

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4414.mp3]
Link epi4414.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to episode 4-414 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   I’m trying to get this one out early this week because this weekend is the Leadville 100 Trial race – “The race across the sky”.  I’ll be flying out Thursday night to pace Eric over the weekend. 

Truly, this has all the earmarks of an adventure (with a capital A).  This is the thing I really dig about longer endurance events.  Whether a marathon, multi-day relay or and ultra, you really have no idea what’s going to happen when you toe the line. 

There os that middle road, the one you are planning for, or more appropriately guessing at, that travels a clean but relatively uninteresting path, where everything stays within expectations.  That middle road where nothing weird or memorable happens.   You just run your miles and bask in the warm glow of an expected job well done.  You trained.  You showed up.  You ran.  You finished.  You wipe your hands, note the effort in your log, check the box and move on. 

That is the less interesting path without much adventure. 

But there is always a chance, I’d say better than 50/50 that something goes sideways. 

There are those glowing, multi-colored traces that arc off of the main path at crazy angles into the unknown.  This is where the good stuff happens.

Adventure is when you show up for a 12-person relay and there are only 8 runners.  Adventure is when you start throwing up 75 miles in.  Adventure is when you roll that ankle or crash your bike in the early miles.  Adventure is when that storm blows in with its driving wind and hail. 

Adventure steps in and tears up your well-made plans. Adventure wipes the slate and resets the score. It strips you of your smug comfort and your middle of the road expectations. 

But, my friends, adventure is not catastrophe.  Adventure is not some evil, beady-eyed thug stepping out of a side alley to blacken your eyes and steal your money.

No, my friends, adventure is an opportunity.  Adventure strips away our silly human thoughts of predetermination and let’s us draw on deeper pools of resource and strength that we didn’t know we had.  Adventure, you see, leads to fulfillment. 

Adventure is where the “Epic” lies.  Adventure to the shores of new worlds, and to the walls of Troy. Adventure is a tool to flush out the human spirit.  We, endurance athletes, we hardy few, we celebrate Adventure.

“You are better than you think you are, and can do more than you think you can.” – Ken Chlouber

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

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Section one – Form series Chapter Three - http://runrunlive.com/form-series-chapter-3

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Matt Schorer

Matt is father, husband and triathlete from upstate NY who recently made the successful move to reclaim his health. 

Matt is currently training for the Lake Placid IronMan in Late June of this year.

https://www.facebook.com/fatguytotriguy/

https://www.facebook.com/matt.schorer.71/about

https://www.facebook.com/dailyfitbook/

 

 

Section two – Thoughts on Seneca’s Letters– http://runrunlive.com/about-senecas-letters

Outro

Well, my friends, you fixed your form and fixed your sites on the new horizon, which, by the way, was the name of a NASA probe that made a flyby of poor old demoted king of the kuiper belt but no longer a planet Pluto, and then, even more astoundingly cool, Ultima Thule which turned out to be two big chunks of accreted dust bunnies from the birth of the solar system 4 billion years ago, to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-414, which is in some small way astounding in itself.

For me the weirdness that is my life continues.  I try to not struggle against the current so much.  I try the choose, as much as I cah the rocks to bump against on the way. 

I will be pacing Eric this weekend at Leadville.  And, don’t anyone tell him, but I’m terrified.  My training has been shyte (it’s not really bad language if I use a non-U.S. dialect).  I’ve still got that damn rattle in my lungs from whatever that airplane cold was, I’m thinking consumption, or maybe grippe, or apoplexy – but I’m no doctor.  And I have the great personal responsibility to guide a dear friend through 38 miles of dusty Colorado trail, at night, over a pass that tops out at 12,600 feet. 

I may die.  I would rather die than not support a friend who needs me.  People often over estimate my ability, but, thankfully they also underestimate my insanity – so it balances out. 

Assuming I survive this adventure I am actually registered for a series of hard races, that I’m also not prepared for. 

Screw it. Why change my approach now and do the smart thing?  That might work but it’s a boring narrative. 

I’m going to call this a training run.  A nice long hike in the woods.  Good for building strength and base aerobic fitness, right? 

Then in a couple weeks I’ll run the Wapack trail race and that’s another nice strength builder.   Which is stupid because a week after that I’m signed up for a marathon to see if I can’t get a qualification time before the Boston registration window closes. 

Ya never know.  It’s happened before.  Remember when I rolled out of that 6-hour Spartan race in 2017 and requalified at Portland?  Or when I turned my training for an Olympic tri into a qualifier at Baystate in 2018?  It happens.  I have a history of doing better when I’m not focused.

I’m also signed up for the Baystate Marathon in October which would give me 6-7 weeks of training to make another good show. 

I still have some tendonitis in my ass.  My knee is still crunchy from crashing in June.  The machete injury healed fully, so at least I have that going for me.  Maybe the $1,000 emergency room visit was worth it.  Although my wife is of the opinion that I should have gone to the Redi-clinic or stitched it up myself.  And I may be patient zero for some new form of zombie plague that starts as a juicy night cough you can’t shake. 

So – everything is status quo over here at the RunRunLive HQ. 

And honestly I’m happy to be alive. 

But, I can hear you scream, “Chris, no one cares a wit about your constant stream of whinging about running.  What about the puppy?”

As we speak Ollie the border collie is what? 10-11 weeks old?  He’s growing like a weed.  He bites everything and everybody.  If it exists it goes in the mouth.  He’s sleeping through the night mostly in his crate, but usually sleep in the couch in the vicinity and that calms him down.  He’s a random poop and pee machine, but we’re working on it.  He is teaching us patience. 

I’ve realized how much older I am since I last had a puppy or a baby in the house.  They have two speeds – all ahead full and sleep. 

He likes to destroy Yvonne’s perennials. He like to chew on rocks.  He likes to steal my socks.  The other day I walked out to my garden with him.  I picked a pile of produce.  Tomatoes, peppers, squash and cucumbers.  He stole one of my cucumbers and gleefully kept it away from me as I grumbled and fumed and chased.  He capered away with a sparkle in his eye.

I ended up freezing that cucumber so he could use it as a chew toy. 

He’s probably a month ahead of where Buddy was at this age.  Buddy was the runt of the litter, a sad little dog that grew into his wonder.  Ollie is the class clown, full of energy, bravado and clever impishness.

Does he run? Yes, he does.  He’s traversed the mile-ish trail with me at a trot a couple times now.  He’s not quite sure what we’re doing but he hangs with me and has plenty of juice left over at the end. 

At the end of the day I’m happy to have this little, warm ball of fur weaving around my legs and trying to knock me down so he can bite my face.  I need that.  I miss that.

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4414.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 9:20am EDT

Let’s talk about form

Part 2 in a series on form

Ok Bubbah, you’ve been patient .  Now I want to fill in the details .

Before I start out, let me say one thing; if you’re getting out and running and enjoying yourself then don’t obsess about form.  If it’s working for you, hey, that’s perfect.  I don’t mean to form-shame anyone.  I certainly don’t have perfect form. 

But, if you want to learn more form.  Let’s talk. 

I always worry about this because it is so holistic.  There are so many moving pieces – it s like juggling octopi. 

But – we will progress.  The other point worth mentioning is there are a bunch of interconnected movements here and there is really no precedence in what sequence to work them.  Most coaches start with foot strike and posture, so that’s where we are going to start. 

Foot strike – This is when, where and how often your foot hits the ground.  Let’s talk about ‘how often’.

Cadence: In your running form there is a certain frequency to your foot strike.  It is 180 hits per minute.  That’s the magic number.  That’s the cadence.  Plus or minus 2 hits per minute. 

Like everything else that may vary slightly from runner to runner, but overall this number is pretty solid.  When I count my cadence it is usually a bit low, in the 170’s.  When I’m doing speed work it might be a bit fast.  Uphill, downhill, it varies, but somewhere around 180 is a good number.

Bump   Bump    Bump   That’s the cadence.  Burn it in.  Bump   Bump   Bump

There are different ways to count your cadence.  Newer GPS watches come with a foot-pod accessory that you can stick in your shoe and it will count your cadence for you as part of the data. 

The easy way is to just look at your watch, or phone, note the time and count each time your right or left foot hits the ground. At the end of the minute multiply that by 2. There’s your cadence.

There is also a ton of music you can get, and even a metronome app that will give you a 180 count you can practice with. 

When you first time your cadence you’ll typically find that you are too slow.  It’s seldom too fast. The reason your cadence is too slow is because you are over-striding. What does that mean?  It means you’re reaching out too far in front with your leading foot and dwelling too long in the transition.

Which is a nice segue into next bit of running form in the foot strike itself.  

You want to pull your form upright and forward so that your center of gravity is slightly forward of your foot strike. 

Your center of gravity should be slightly forward of your foot strike. 

Where is your center of gravity? It’s in your core.   In your torso.  You want to push that center of gravity out in front of you so that you are falling forward.  You are falling and you are catching yourself as you are falling. 

The way you push your center of gravity forward is by pushing your hips forward.    Imagine that there is a rope tied to your belly button and it is pulling you forward.  Push those hips forward.   Move that torso so it is falling forward. 

Then your feet have to keep up with that forward fall.  This almost forces you to land on the forefoot.  That space right behind the toes.  You feel the foot hit the ground, but since you are falling you flow through that foot strike and kick it up behind.

Fast, hot feet.  Bump bump  bump.

No lingering on the foot strike.  Bump bump bump.

A great mantra here is “Light Feet” or “Run Lightly” this will remind you to loosen up, run tall and maintain fast cadence.

Fall through the foot strike.  

Push those hips forward. 

Move those feet quickly. 

Bump bump bump.

Think about your torso.   When your hips are pushed forward that automatically straightens up your posture.

You should be, in the words of running coaches “Running tall”. 

Don’t slump forward. Straighten up your shoulders.  High and square.  Light and relaxed. 

Let all that tension release out of your back and shoulders. 

It’s all being pulled along by the hips. 

Bring your head up.  Look forward.  Relax your chin.  Smile.   Breathe.  In through the nose.  Out through the mouth.  

What do you do with your hands?

Bring your hands up lightly to your chest.  Elbows at 90 degrees and slightly pushed back behind you.  Straight back and forward in rhythm with your quick stride. 

Hold your hands lightly and open, high and close to your chest. 

Quiet your arms and hands. 

Don’t swing or pump.  Just quiet.  High and quiet.  light and quiet.

Bump Bump Bump. 

In your mind imagine a string that runs down your spine and pulls you upright.  Though the top of your head.  Run tall.  Hips forward.

Bump Bump bump. 

Forefoot strike.

Hot feet.

Bump Bump Bump. 

Light feet.

Fast feet. 

Tall and strong. 
Easy.

Relax into this form. 

Tall and strong. 

When you get into the right spot there is no wasted energy.  There is no pushing off.  You are falling easily down the trails with you light, fast, feet catching you. 

That’s good running form. 

Next time we’ll talk about some of the “Why do you care?” moments for running form.  Like in races. 

Last time I asked you to look at the form of good runners and make a mental note of what that looks like.  I also asked you to have someone video your own form so you can see the difference. 

This week I’m going to ask you to pay attention when you’re out running with other people.  If you have a running group take a look at the various ways people run. 

Better yet, if you are in or watching a race watch what happens to people’s form at the end. When they get tired what happens?

This is fun right?

 

Direct download: 4413-Form.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:38pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-413 – Morgan Writes in the Wilderness

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4413.mp3]
Link epi4413.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to episode 4-413 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   We’ve got a great show for you-all today.

A couple weeks ago I interviewed Morgan.   I really enjoyed the interview.  You’ll hear the story in the conversation, but the brief version is that I get the privilege to read a lot of books by athletes, and seldom does the writing do justice to the story.

In most cases there is just too much exposition and too much linear narrative.  Morgan’s book, “Outlandish” is the exception.  She is good at her craft. And I dig that. 

Also, note that about 17 minutes into the interview my phone crapped out and we had to reconnect to finish it.

In section one I’ll give you a nice stand-alone audio on good running form.  I’ll also post it as a separate file so that you can have it to listen to independently when you’re out and about on your feet.

In section two I’m going to finish talking through the “Happiness Curve” which I completed last week while traveling. 

It has been an action-packed couple weeks since we last talked. 

I knocked off 16 miles with my Sunday-Morning Buddies on that one Sunday that was really hot and humid.  It was pretty awful.  I got home, took a shower and immediately napped for 2 hours.  I fought through it though and that was a good confidence builder.

I was down in Memphis at a client last week, (the week of the 21st of July 2019 – for those of you who are time traveling – or are interested aliens from another dimension and need a way-point). 

I got a couple decent runs in on the sidewalks.  

Had some dicey travel coming back and didn’t end up getting to bed until 4:00 AM on Friday morning. But, of course I was still at work at 9:00!  

Then Saturday, Yvonne and I drove out to North Central PA to meet up with Greg to pace the Conquer the Canyon ½ marathon.

I know what you’re saying, “this is normal Chris stuff”, but wait for it…

The big news is that we stopped to see a puppy litter on our way and came home with a new puppy! 

Yup, an eight-week border collie. 

I don’t know what I was thinking.  It’s like having a new baby in the house.  He’s starting to settle in now, but he’s a terror.   God help us.  As I am editing this sitting on the steps in my front yard he wasthrowing up some grass he just ate, now he’s rolling in it.  And...managing to be cute as hell in the process…

Oh, and I picked up a cold traveling.  So I lost some more training time and the continuous sleep deprivation doesn’t help at all!

I’m still a bit of a train wreck in my training…or should that be ‘training wreck’.

I’ll give you a story.  I posted a workout to Instagram.  One of my runs down in Memphis.  Nothing special just a sidewalk 8 miler out and back.  And one of the comments was that’s a pretty good pace and distance…wait for it… for a guy your age!  That’s it.  I’ve entered the “for a guy your age” club! 

And, because my expectations are exceeding low, I’m happy with that.

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Form series Chapter Two - http://runrunlive.com/lets-talk-about-form

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Morgan Sjogren

https://therunningbum.com/about/

Morgan Sjogren (“SHOW gren”) is a writer, adventurer, and former elite track athlete turned avid trail runner. A lifelong competitive runner, Morgan has raced sprints on the track to ultramarathons in the mountains, yet she prefers using running as a vehicle to explore wild places.

Her writing focuses on human-powered adventure, public lands, conservation, history, travel and food. Find her writing and photography published by REI, Runner’s World, Trail Runner, Patagonia, Archaeology Southwest, Sidetracked, Gear Junkie, Snowsports Industries America (SIA), The Gulch and Adventure Pro.

Sjogren is the author of three books. The Best Bears Ears National Monument Hikes, the first guidebook devoted to the National Monument. Her forthcoming guidebook, The Best Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument Hikes releases this year. Both are focused on educating the public to visit their lands with a conservation mindset.

Outlandish is a sun-soaked starter manual to fueling your own epic. Through her riveting ersonal stories, flavorful recipes, and the book’s gotta-go-there photographs, Sjogren shares her advice and lessons learned from years exploring the desert Southwest while living out of her canary-yellow Jeep Wrangler. Outlandish is a gorgeous guide to a more adventurous life.

Section two – The Happiness Curve Final cut– http://runrunlive.com/the-happiness-curve-wrap-up

 

 

Outro

Well, my friends, you packed your jeep with burritos and set out into the wastes for a long, soul searching, run and found yourself at the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-413,

Was it cathartic?

For the conquer the canyon ½ marathon,  I met Greg and was official alternate pacer for the 2:00 hour group.  It was fun to be able to coach people along and help them get through the race. 

The key difference when you’re pacing is that you aren’t going very hard, so you can help others.  That’s good, right?  That’s sharing some of that wisdom.  If you’re heads down racing you don’t have the bandwidth to help other runners. 

It was a pretty, wooded course along a packed gravel rail trail that follows a river through a canyon.  No hills.  Kind footing.  Decent scenery.  We had a bald eagle watching us at one point.

I think the best part about pacing is that people come up to you afterwards and thank you for helping them.  That’s cool, when someone thanks you for getting them through the rough spot and thanks you for getting them a PR. 

And there you go, one of the keys to happiness: helping others. 

My mileage has been pretty low.  I’m getting out 3 days a week.  I still feel that mountain bike dinger in my knee.  I rehabbed the hamstring pull I gave myself in that 5k a couple weeks ago.  And I’m just about through the other side of the airplane cold I caught traveling last week. 

I’ve been doing 3 sessions a week of high-hamstring tendinosis exercises.  Trying to get my glutes and hips strong.  It’s a couple sets of hip bridges, a couple sets of clamshells, and a couple sets of planks.  In between sets I do pushups and incline situps – so I’m keeping a bit of core strength.  I figure if I can still do a hundred pushups and 200 situps I can’t be that out of shape, right?

Next up for me is pacing Eric at Leadville in a couple weeks. Good thing I’m picking him up at 50 miles!  I have no doubt I can muscle through some Rocky Mountain High miles at 3.5 miles per hour. 

I did a night run last night over to the ski area next to my house.  I ran over and did the ski hill, hike up, run down, hike up, run down – ended up with 10+ miles and about 2,00 feet of climbing.  At this ski area they have a tiki bar in the summer months with bad cover bands and the like.  

The bouncers rode over on a golf cart to see what I was up to.  They could see my lights going up and down the mountain.  Told them I was training.  They weren’t happy but they went away.  I guess it might not make sense to see and old guy humping up and down the double diamond late at night.

Then I got up early this morning and ran part of the Wapack with Paul.   That was perfect.  Doing those technical mountains on tired legs was just the ticket.    

I’ll tell you a couple more stories to take you out. 

First, was on the plane flying back.  I sit next to this guy, maybe a couple years younger than me.  Looks a bit squirrely, a bit nervous, so I ask him where he’s going.  Turns out he’s going to Boston to meet his daughter who he hasn’t seen in 21 years, since she was 4 years old. 

Felt like I had stumbled into a reality TV show!

His story was that he had a drinking problem, left them and moved to California. Now he’s cleaned up and the ex-wife had orchestrated the reunion.  No wonder he was nervous.

I told him to not worry about the past and just be in the moment and this isn’t about him, and he’s going to do great.   Wish I could be a fly on that wall. 

Then, final story, I’m at this brewery with Tim and Frank, two of my running buddies, in Lowell, catching up.  They let people bring their dogs in to this brewery.  It’s all very Bohemian.  Bit of a hole in the wall.  I dig it. 

I’m at the bar saying hi to this big goofy pit bull and there’s a guy there, bit older than me.

He leans down to pet the dog, turns to me and says “A lot of times they’re afraid of me because they can smell the cancer.” 

How do you respond to something like that? 

Luckily, I happen to know everything, so I said, “You know, I’ve heard about that.”

People are funny.  I was out at the race last week and no one said “Hey, you’re that guy!” and no one asked me how many marathons I’d done. I didn’t wear any Boston gear.  I was basically anonymous. 

It was a different crowd. It wasn’t about me. 

If you want to be popular at a race, ask people about their accomplishments, ask them about their stories, listen intently, and then congratulate them when they tell you.

Everybody has stories. 

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4413.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:36pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-411 – Katy Sheratt – CEO Back on my Feet

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4411.mp3]
Link epi4411.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to episode 4-411 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   Like I mentioned last week 411 and 412 are out of order due to the forecasted recording sequence being different than the actual recording sequence and me not wanting to go move files around. 

But, I know you, you don’t care about such things.  You care about important things like running past your house at the end of a long run to pick up that last .003 miles because you’ll be damned if you enter 6.97 miles into your log.

Today we have a very good interview with Katy Sherratt who is the front person, the leader, for Back on My Feet.  This is the organization that helps homeless individuals by leveraging the transformational power of running. 

We have spoken with this organization before.  We have history.  I was so fascinated by their program that I chased down the initial leadership team for an interview back in episode 89, which would have been 10 years ago, and then interviewed one of their recovering addicts in episode 167.  So, if your interested we’ve got sample points in the life cycle curve of this program from its birth to where it is now. 

It’s a testament to how effective and resonant the program is that it grew from that nascent good idea of one runner in Baltimore to the professionally managed, multi-city, international manifestation of today.  And, I was interested to ask Katy about that progression.  Katy is a professional and you can hear the media coaching in her responses, but I think I did a good job of asking the questions that I truly wanted to understand. 

My training is not going great.  I’ve still got this troublesome high-hamstring tendinosis that is really curtailing my ability to push the pace or climb hills at pace.  It’s fine until I load it then it screams back at me.  I’m currently working through the best way to re-hab it. 

That being said I have been getting some good volume in.  I’m trying to get 2 longer runs of 8 – 10 miles in during the week, then get a bike ride in on Saturday, then go longer on Sunday on the tired legs.  But, it’s a bit unstructured and I a feel a bit adrift.

It’s getting hot and humid up here and the bugs are out.  This makes trail running a bit less enjoyable.

I tweaked it Tuesday night and I’m limping around a bit right now.  It was a hot night.  There is a summer race series that many folks from my club run in near my office so I decided I’d run over to the race, run the 5k with them, then run back.

Jogged over, it was about 4 miles away.  That was ok, a nice easy warm up.  Then I lined up for the 5K.  No big deal.  I just kicked it off at a solid tempo pace and felt pretty good.  Clicked off the first mile at around a 7 minute mile, working hard but not killing myself, it had a lot of downhill.  Then the course climbs a little hill over a bridge, over the river, and as I was leaning into the hill something tweaked in my left hamstring.

I didn’t stop running but I slowed down to a pace where I wasn’t loading the hamstring and limped it in.   Got passed by a lot of people in the 2nd mile!  Had to get a ride back to my office.  2 days later and it is still noticeable sore.  So, looks like I have a new project.

I listen to a lot of history podcasts.  And when I find a new one, I typically start at the beginning and listen through until I’m caught up.  The interesting thing about this to me, is the pattern.  There’s this arc to a successful podcast. 

They start out as tentative and unsure of themselves. Then they start to get positive feedback and they find their stride.  They comment with amazement on the 100 listeners, then the 1,000 listeners and the 10,000 listeners. 

Then they start to think that this could be a fulltime job for them and they start to look for revenue.  The audible ads, the Patrion page, the iTunes reviews.

At some point they become quite pleased with their progress and start having Q&A session about “Why they got into the podcast and where they got the theme music and some even quit their jobs. You can do that if you’re a history major.

It’s fun to watch.  I’m not sure what part of that cycle I’m in.  I decided quite early on that this was a labor of love and I was primarily doing it as an exercise in self-preservation and improvement for myself, not for any practical or commercial concern.  I talked to sponsors, but to be honest, I hate commercials and there just isn’t enough money in ads to move my needle.   

I stopped paying attention to numbers but, weirdly to imagine, we’ve had multi-millions of downloads from around the world.  I don’t even know how to containerize that number.  Each of those might be some individual, you for instance, at some point in their lives, looking for some combination of information, entertainment or inspiration, I get that personal touch point, but I can’t wrap my brain around the abstract of ‘millions’.

I do get a bit of a satisfied feeling about the 400+ hours of content we have available for you now.  That’s a goodly chunk body of work and by my calculations represents about a million words of content.  That’s 4-5 goodly books worth of material.

So, thank you all, whoever you are, wherever you are, and whenever you are, for facilitating my personal journey of creation.  I appreciate it. 

I think the lesson here, is that you, yes you, as an individual can start something for no apparent reason and it can be the proverbial snowball that creates an avalanche. 

For me it’s bee the personal connection and friends and opportunities for connection that are the best part.  For you it might be fame and fortune. 

Put yourself in the running shoes of Anne Mahlum.  You are running in Philly at 5 o’clock in the morning and you keep running by the homeless shelter. You think to yourself, “Ya know what would be a good idea?  If someone were to invite these folks out for a run and potentially transform their lives.” 

And so she started Back on my Feet with that one small thought and that one kick of the snowball.

What’s your snowball?

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Form series Chapter One - http://runrunlive.com/form-series-chapter-one

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Katy Sherratt

Katy Sherratt leads Back on My Feet as Chief Executive Officer. An award-winning social innovation leader, Katy has been instrumental in increasing Back on My Feet’s programmatic impact by over 75% and introduced new and important measures to demonstrate the holistic impact of the program. Under her tenure, Back on My Feet has gone from early stage startup to sustainable organization and is now a leader in the homelessness services space nationwide. Funding has increased by over 50% thanks to the growth of existing, and cultivation of new, partnerships and fundraising streams and the geographic expansion of operations along the East and West coasts.

Katy has been recognized across multiple media and news outlets including by The Economist’s Philanthrocapitalism program as a leader in social innovation and cutting edge non-profit management. In 2016 she was also named among Women’s Running Magazine’s “Top 20 Gamechangers” and most recently a winner at the Philadelphia Social Innovation Awards.

Katy brings over 15 years of leadership experience across both the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Prior to joining Back on My Feet, Katy led global projects for Accenture in their UK and US-based Strategy Practices working with corporate clients, NGOs and nonprofits with clients ranging from leading Financial Institutions to the United Nations. “I’m honored to lead such a unique, dynamic and growing organization,” said Katy. “You don’t have to be a marathoner or even a 5K runner, to feel the power of what we do on the morning runs – the community we build for individuals experiencing homelessness is the critical missing link and the reason why we’ve had such huge success in enabling our members to transition out of homelessness and maintain that transition.”

 

Section two – The Happiness Curve – navigating the cliff - http://runrunlive.com/the-happiness-curve-navigating-the-cliff

 

 

Outro

Well, my friends, that was fun, huh?  You got up at 5:00 AM and ended up at the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-411, you are amazing.

I have no idea whether or not I’m going to survive this summer with the sore but and sore knee and hot weather, I’m a hot mess!  But it is the season I’m in, yeah? 

I’ll give you a couple tips. 

The first tip, which I haven’t tested yet, bt seems to be corroborated from multiple sources is how to make a DIY der fly trap.  The deer flies are awful this time of year. I got chased out of the woods by them last week.  Even if you have the big hat on and the bug spray they still harass you in their multitudes.

You can buy the deer fly patches which are a sticky patch that you put on the back of your hat that they get stuck on.  Or, you can make them.  The instructions are to take some blue tape (apparently the flies like blue and that painters tape works great) and create a 2X6 inch patch on the back of your hat.  Then apply a layer of an off the shelf product called “Tanglefoot” which is sticky goop that you apply to tree trunks to keep bugs from climbing up.

That’s it. This will trap the flies, or enough of them, to solve the problem. 

The second tip is for your bottles.  If you carry water bottles on your run, either in your hand or in a belt, you may notice that they start to taste a bit moldy as they age.  Especially if you have been putting sports drink concoctions in them. 

It just can’t be helped.  The sugars get turned into wildlife.  You can wash them out.  You can rinse them with a bleach solution.  You can put them in the dishwasher.  But once those beasties get in there it’s a losing battle. 

I don’t want to gross you out but the problem is typically hiding in your nipples.  That rubber bit that sticks out of the top of the bottle has crevices that you can’t get to. 

But guess what?  If you pull on that nipple you can usually get it to pop off.  Once you pop it off you’ll see all the black stuff in there and you can scrub it out.   Then you can pop it back in. Good to go.

So that’s it.  We went from form to homelessness to old age to moldy nipples – such are the seasons of life.

 

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4411.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:50pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-412 – Maryro does Comrades

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4412.mp3]
Link epi4412.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to episode 4-412 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  You’ll have to forgive me an episode incongruity here, a non-linear scrap of publishing.  I had a couple interviews stack on top of each other, like the way you stack your hips in a yoga pose, and, apparently, in the race to you ears, episode 4-412 won out over episode 4-411. 

Confused?  Don’t be.  It will be fine. 

Today, this week, you will get episode 4-412, an interview by my friend Alex, long time participant of the RunRunLive podcast experience, of another long-time friend of the show Maryro Mendez, who ran Comrades this year. 

I’m always fascinated with Comrades.  It seems such a foreign place, an extreme adventure.  Both Alex and Maryro are world travelers.  I have yet to make it to Africa.  Except, maybe through enjoying a good read of “The Heart of Darkness”. 

In section one I’m going to give you the run-down on the cow-pasture race.  I got some positive feedback on the uncertainty essay from last show, thank you for that.  I certainly appreciate it. 

I struggled to write that last episode.  I felt too jacked up about other things.  I need a certain amount of alone time and contemplation to get the creative juices flowing and I couldn’t get settled. 

That has been solved!  I am took Vacation!  Yes, just my wife and I down on Cape Cod enjoying the beautiful weather.  Soaking up the sea breezes.  Very peaceful.  No internet.  Just reading and relaxing.

In section two I’m going to piece together a vacation story for you. 

I took 5 days off from running and riding due to a sore knee.  It was one of those things where I probably tried to do too much too fast.  In this case the too much part had to do with going mountain bike riding with Anthony. 

Don’t get me wrong, I love Anthony. Anthony has taught me an un-repayable number of useful things about bikes and riding over the last decade.  But, for my second ride in the woods in two years he overestimates my ability.  And, I on my part feel compelled to keep up, like a boy trying to please his Dad. 

I ended up bleeding from 4 different wounds at the end of the night.  Nothing life threatening.  Just those slow speed, slow motion crashes that stalk you when you haven’t got the miles in yet. That little bit of uncertainty, that spoonful of tentativeness as you go into an obstacle those few millimeters off your line that find you wide in the turns and stuck in the bad spots. 

You might call it ‘anti-flow’ 

On one of these slow speed crashes I couldn’t clip out and took the full weight of mass times acceleration (due to the force of gravity) on a pointy rock with my left knee.  It hurt but didn’t feel consequential at the time. 

Over the next week it just ached a bit as I kept up my running and cycling.  Finally, with the race in the cow pasture Wednesday night,  going hard on uneven ground and the knee seemed to be more sore than it should be after a week, so I did the smart thing and took a few days off. 

I was a bit worried I might lose fitness, but I managed to get over myself, and do a little core work and yoga instead.  Still a little sore, but I think it’s on the mend.  We’ll see.  I guess I don’t heal as fast as I used to. 

But, I feel pretty good and it’s summer time, and the days are long and what can be wrong with that?

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Lonely Cows - http://runrunlive.com/lonely-cows

Voices of reason – the conversation

Alex Cooke Interviews Maryro Mendez

Comrades Marathon 2019(up run): The other big 5

People always come to Africa wanting to see the big 5, Lion, Elephant, Leopard, Rhino and Buffalo, but I came here with the mission of not just seeing but conquering the other big 5. The nerve wracking 5 famous hills along the Comrades route, Cowies Hill, Fields Hill, Botha’s Hill, Inchanga and Polly shorts. What ever people can say about this race, they would be falling short but I will just describe my own experience here.

On our way to Durban, Andrey had a packed itinerary. We spent 2 days in Johannesburg and 5 days in Kruger National Park, chasing the animals and we were rewarded with amazing sightings. That on its own is worth a different write up.

We arrived in Durban on Friday afternoon, went straight to the expo, picked up my race pack and wonder around a bit just to feel the vibe but not too long. 

The city was filled with incredible energy. The people were amazing from day one.

There is no hiding that I was scared, scared of failure, of not finishing. I knew I had put it a lot of work but also knew I had not been feeling quite right, mentally and physically. I also knew even when I was creative trying to do hill work, living in Rotterdam, NL I lacked that part.

I felt excitement, fear and pure joy to be there. It was the fact that I was stepping in to the unknown but actually knowing that it was going to be the hardest race I had ever done that made this so especial. It was actually being part of a race that it is so important to a nation and you can feel it as soon as you land in Durban. Less than 10% of the 25000 runners are international runners, the rest are South Africans whom are very proud of their race. Only 20% are women.

On Saturday Andrey went hiking up Royal Natal Park and also drove on the route while I stayed in the hotel resting. When he got back, he said “if you see those hills, the first 40km are the most difficult, you have never done anything like it. Even by car they look horrible” ok that scared me even more.

“I got the belief, I will embrace the experience that I have earned after 5 months of hard training when conditions weren’t ideal. I got the belief that I am enough, good enough to be here but I will be patient and cautious because no medal will come easy tomorrow” I said to myself on Saturday. 

I woke up at 3:15, had some Ucan and almond butter, had a shower and we left for the start at 4:30 for a 5:30 start. Luckily our hotel was just in front so I was in my corral before 5. The atmosphere was incredible. I was next to a South African guy doing his 11th comrades. He started talking to me with a very zen like tone. He told me to be patient, that his first was also the up run and he did it in 10h15min. Even when my ultimate goal was to finish, on a good day I thought I could do 10h (A goal), my B goal was to finish under 10:30 but I thought “maybe my first can be close to this guy’s 10:15”. I also wanted to finish before sun set (5:15 pm)

The start is just amazing, very emotional no point describing because you have to be there to live it. Never felt such an emotional start in a race.

I started my watch as soon as the gun went off because this race is gun time and all the cut offs and different medals are awarded by gun time. I was seeded in corral C so took me a few minutes to cross but not too long. I had my watch in overall time and average pace, this time I didn’t want to get distracted  by mile splits that made no sense. It was very humid and I was sweating like crazy even when the sun was not out yet and I started to worry but tried to just keep it together. The sea of people in front and behind was incredible to see thinking we had 87 km to go. I followed Bruce Fordyce’s advice and ignored the distance markers that go in count down mode. 

I was running by feel and just checking my total time and average pace every now and again specially when I passed the cut off points (there are 7 in total) that would give a good idea of how much I was slowing down or not. I realised very early on that running up the hills in such a slow pace felt very inefficient, just didn’t feel natural to me so I decided to power hike up the hills. This was not a walking break this was very intense walking. I was passing people running while I walked up the hills, felt just like Killian Jornet  . However I did not train my body to do this so every time I was changing from walking to running my calves would rebel against me. I could feel my lower back too. But I just when over the initial transition discomfort and continue and as soon as I was in running mode it felt good again.

“do not stop” that was my other strategy, no matter what, I was not stopping for anything. And I didn’t.

There is no doubt as to when you are going up the big hills, they are relentlessly brutal. I was scared to ask anyone if we were at any of those hills in case I got NO for an answer.

All along the route the atmosphere is delightful, the locals set up tents full of aid for people apart from the official 43 water stations and they do it every year. People singing, dancing, bbqing. Going pass the wall of honour was neat, thinking my name could be there once I finished. When I reached Arthur’s seat I touched it out is respect and moved on. When I reached half way at 43km to go I knew I had just done the hardest marathon (a bit over a marathon) I had ever done in my life and I still had more than a marathon to go. I was supposed to see Andrey there but nothing. I struggled a little, but I said The only way you are not finishing this is if you do not make any the cut off point and you are forced to stop and get on a bus. 

The 10h bus passed me. They are amazing to watch. You can hear them coming, it is like a pack of horses trotting and singing. I felt a little disappointed that there would be no sub 10 for me but I was clear by that point I had underestimated the course so I just continued with my mission.

Suddenly with like 37km to go a familiar voice when I was not expecting “Moni, Moni” it was Andrey. That was my only stop. Maybe for just a minute or two. I grabbed a ucan bar and the hotshot anti cramp, which saved me because my calves were alive and kicking. My lower back was sore again for the power walking I am guessing. That gave me a second wind. 

The10:30h bus passed me and I was between 1h30- 1h20 ahead of the cut off time at the check points every time. I caught up with the 10:30 bus again. I was going to stay with them but I felt good so left them behind. 

The Coca Cola station is amazing and this kid starting calling, “my lady get a coke my lady” I grabbed a coke (never ever I drink real full sugar coke) and boy that felt good, it was iced cold. He said “I knew you wanted a coke my lady push on continue” and that my friends is reason 1568 I loved Comrades. With 20km to go I decided it was time to start counting down the km and noticed every km board. A runner with a green number that had done 13 Comrades started talking to me, he asked about my shoes, he congratulated me for my first comrades finish to which I thanked them but said that there was still 20 km to go. He said you will finish I know.

With 17 km to go I saw Andrey up on a bridge after I went under it, again great surprise, I waved and continued.

I reached little pollys, she is like The hiena, not part of the big 5 but her presence doesn’t go unnoticed in the wilderness. When I hit the 10km to go mark, I started feeling for the first time that I had it in the bag. Now my aim was to go sub 10:15. Then Polly shorts shoes up, and there is no need to ask anyone, I knew this is the famous mighty one that stretches along for 2km. 

Last 7 km I felt strong and full of joy. The down hills were hard, my toes were completely wrecked or so they felt. And the uphills even though shorter in comparison really sneaked up on you.

5 km to go and there he was again, I saw Andrey and I said “see you at the finish” saying that felt so good. I have say the performance of the day goes to him. Driving around with road closures it was messy.

4 km to go I kept checking my watch, 3 km to go and suddenly I felt it was taking too long for the 2k mark but then I saw 1km to go!!! I had missed the 2 km mark. 

I was there, I got chills. Yeah and because it is Comrades there is one final mini climb a few meters to the finish.

I crossed the line 10h 13 minutes and 55 seconds after the gun went off and got my bronze medal. 

The different colour bibs depending on if you are national or international, the number of medals on your bib, the different medals depending on your finish time, the people oh the people and how passionate they are, all that make this race extra especial.

With regards to nutrition I had 2 chia gels(low carb) and almond butter during the first third of the race. Then I started taking maurten gels I had 5 in total. I also had half a bar of ucan and some coke (I still can’t believe I drank full sugar coke but the even had ice cubes!) in the second half. I think probably consumed about 1000-1200 cals. I never felt I needed to eat but I forced myself to have something every 30 mins or so. I also had high5 zero electrolyte tablets. I grabbed 2 water poaches in maybe 40 out of the 43 water station, they were always cold so one to drink and one for my head and neck. All races should have those.

I realised now why this race was unique for me. I normally enjoy the training, the process more that the races themselves. Races are always an excuse for me to train. This time for the first time was the other way around, I enjoyed the race more than the training, the race was a whole process in itself that was changing me for the better as I went through. The race was a whole new experience. 

From a performance standpoint I could say I am a little sad I didn’t get a sub 10 but I am actually very happy my splits were consistent, I finished strong and I learned a lot. In the end it is only running so the time itself is nothing in comparison to what you gain as a person through running. But the type A person I am is already looking at what to improve 

Comrades you are much more that people say, I will be back for the down run but next summer is already committed for other adventures so will be tight. If not in 2020 I will be back for the 100th Comrades in 2021 which will be another down run as it was the original...and maybe for my second I can properly aim for a better time 

I am a runner because I run, I run because I am a runner 

We carry with us, deep inside, the knowledge that we have faced our fears and conquered challenges, and with that brings confidence, peace of mind and self-belief.

Section two – Puzzle Pieces - http://runrunlive.com/puzzle-pieces

 

Outro

Well, my friends you run the uphill course to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-412, see you in Paradise City.

Got a couple nice long runs and rides in this week down the Cape.  I did my traditional long run on the beach in Chatham.  I went on the 4th itself and it was jammed with people.  Usually once I get a mile or so down the beach I’m pretty much alone, but on the 4ht of July people come out by boat and hang out all over the place. 

At one point there was a seal on the beach injured, probably by a Great White Shark.  Some guy was yelling at me to, I guess, not run by it.  Chill out there Ranger Rick, it’s a seal, not a unicorn.  When I came back the other way they had the seal EMT’s there working on it.  There are a lot of seals and a lot of sharks now on the Cape. 

I ran out of beach almost exactly at 5 miles.  Which gave me a nice tidy 10 for the outing.  I timed it well too.  I got out just after high tide. That means the tide is going out and you get a nice strip of hard sand.

I got out this weekend for an 18+ mile trail run.  Felt ok.  It was a little hard at the end, but it’s supposed to be.  I have to bring my volume up for the races I’m running this summer. 

All in all I got a good mental rest.  I read a couple books.  The best one was a Bradbury collection of short stories from the 70’s.  Great writer Bradbury.  The better read among you will smell a bit of Bradbury in my writing this week.

One of the books I’m working my way through is ‘the happiness curve’ by Jonathan Rauch.  He basically says that the science shows everyone’s life arc is about the same.  You’re happy when your young, you’re miserable when you’re in the prime of your life for the most part and then, in the last bit, the middle age forward, you get happy again, because, I guess you just don’t really care anymore? 

A couple things you can take form that.  One is that your happiness is different depending on what phase of life you’re in.  Another is that it’s, on average, the same experience for everybody. 

There ya go.  Hang in there and it gets better. 

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4412.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:09pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-410 – Tim Vedder Qualifies

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4410.mp3]
Link epi4410.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to episode 4-410 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

It’s been an interesting and, I’ll admit challenging, beginning to the summer.  It’s been a few weeks since the Vermont Cities Marathon race.  I’ve spent that time trying to navigate the inevitable emotional trough and working how and what to do next. 

Even as well worn an athlete as myself is not immune to the post-training cycle slump.  And, as is my habit, one of the ways I work through these things is by talking to you about them.  It’s hard to see when you’re in the Sargasso Sea of a slump, but it is a learning opportunity like anything else. 

In the spirit of this I’m going to talk about some straight-on, tactical solutions to getting out of the blue doldrums in section one and talk a bit about balance in section two.

Our interviewee today is Tim Vedder who goes into what it took in his Boston Marathon quest.  When I started this podcast a dozen or so years ago one of the things I wanted to do was expose every-day, average joe runners to the community, because that’s who we are.  Average Joe and Jill’s who occasionally roll out of bed at 5:00 AM to do hill charges in the freezing rain.

What have I been up to?  Basically taking my own advice and letting loose of the tight grip I had on the wheel of life a bit.  I’ve been trail running, Mountain biking and lifting weights.  And I’ve been eating!  I felt a bit out of sorts being too skinny so I’m letting myself put a few pounds on.  Basically, I’m doing what I want to do, while still staying in good enough shape to be within reach of a race. 

We’ll talk more about what I’ve got on the race calendar at the end.

I got great feedback on my iPhone tips from episode 4409.  It seems I was not the only one getting annoyingly treated to the first song on my list every time I turned the truck on. 

For more detail, the audio I found was a very peaceful and meek morning meditation routine from YouTube.  You can search in YouTube for “Peaceful Morning Meditation” and it will find something to fit the bill.  

To get it off of YouTube and onto your computer Google “YouTube to Mp3”.  This will show you on-line apps that will convert the video to an audio and allow you to download it to your computer.  Then rename the Mp3 file aaaaaaaaaaaa.mp3 – this will cause it to be that default first song in your music library. 

To get it into your iPhone go into iTunes and do “Add File to Library”.  Then, while your phone is connected to the computer you should be able to select this file to be synched, either by name, genre or artist.  (there’s a icon of your phone in iTunes when it is connected and you click on that to set the sync rules).  Then you sync and the mp3 should be on the phone.

There has been a lot of talk recently about digital diets and addiction to the phone apps.  You can track how much time you spend on social media or news and there are ways to set limits. The friends I have who have gone cold-turkey report that they have about a week of withdrawal, but by the second week they feel more in control and have more time. 

Failing that I have some middle of the road tips for you around social.  I don’t use Facebook that much, nor Twitter anymore just because I naturally don’t find it all that interesting.  I do like Instagram.  But, here’s my tip.  Only allow social apps to be used when you are connected to WiFi.  This means you can’t use them randomly as you’re out an about. 

It removes the knee-jerk reaction to check your feeds.  It’s a setting on your phone.  Go into the app and set it to NOT use mobile data connection.  It will keep you from looking at it in the car.  It’s a good compromise. 

Second tip is to turn on the Do Not Disturb while driving.  There’s no reason to be checking you phone while you’re driving.  Turning this on adds a barrier to phone use in the car.  Might save your life. 

Third tip is to turn on a generous quiet time at night.  There is a Do-Not-Disturb setting that you can set your phone to silent between the hours of X and Y.  I set mine to 9:00PM to 6:00AM.  This keeps me from hearing or seeing anything you text to me at 10:00PM when I’ve nodded off. 

Psychologists will always talk about setting boundaries.  The real risk with the technology is that it takes our boundaries away, and that is not good for your mental health.  You have the ability to take some of those personal boundaries back. 

So, take them back. 

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Practical Slump Advice - http://runrunlive.com/changing-it-up

Voices of reason – the conversation

Tim Vedder

Bio: Timm Vedder is a neonatologist in St. Cloud, Minnesota who also serves as a physician in the National Guard. He is married, with two awesome kids. His other athletic pursuits include trail running, triathlon, tennis, and CrossFit.

Section two – Balance - http://runrunlive.com/the-certainty-uncertainty-balance

 

Outro

Well, my friends you Successfully trained and qualified for the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-410, see you in Boston. 

On the calendar I’ve got the ½ marathon pacing duty at the end of July. Then I’ve got Pacing duties at Leadville in mid-August.  I also signed up for a local “last chance to qualify” type marathon for September 8th.  We’ll have to see if I run Wapack on Labor Day.  Then BayState in October.  I don’t think with the weird assortment of races and training this summer I’ll be fit to qualify, but I’m starting to doubt whether I have a clue about my own fitness. 

The first 14 days of June I ran 5 miles a day as one of those slump-busting tactics.  My plantar fasciitis was acting up so I pivoted to bike riding, weight lifting and trail running.  My club had an ice-cream social over in Groton yesterday so I rode Fuji-san over, had a bowl of ice cream, chatted for a bit and rode back. 26 or so miles of road riding separated by ice cream eating.  You won’t find that on your coaches training plan. 

Then I rolled out early this morning for a 15 mile run with my buddies.  My theory is that I for Leadville I have to run on tired legs, so I bike ride on Saturday and long run Sunday.  I’m trying to get 3-4 longish trail runs in a week with a couple rides. 

I’m toying with organizing an overnight run out in July.  This would be a 10 hour trail run where we start at 10:00 PM and run through to 8:00 AM for me that’s probably 50K or more.  This falls under the category of if you do something stupid enough people will join you. 

I did a similar 12 hour run last year as part of my 100 training and it was cool.  It’s quite surrealistic.  Time goes by weirdly fast. 

Enough random training talk.  I hope you are doing well as we move into official summer.  Thanks for bearing with me as some of these episodes come in a couple days late.  I do enjoy the writing, but I am in a place where balance has been hard to find. 

I watched my way through the Netflix original zombie series “Black Summer”.  As much as I appreciate a good zombie show, being a professional zombie hunter myself, this one had a lot of holes in it. They used every zombie trope and seemed to have a very small budget. 

So remember, cardio and double tap and…

I’ll see you out there.

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4410.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 9:10pm EDT

VT 2019 – The French Farce

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/Vermont2019.mp3]
Link Vermont.mp3

Farce.

A farce is a comedy that aims at entertaining the audience through situations that are highly exaggerated, extravagant, and thus improbable. Farce is also characterized by physical humor, the use of deliberate absurdity or nonsense, and broadly stylized performances.

Covered in dirt, sweat and sawdust.  There I was, laying on the table in the emergency room at my local hospital.  A nice thick maroon swell of blood blobbing out of the gash on my shin.  Waiting for the doctor-lady to come back.  You might think this would make me cranky.  But, on the contrary I was having a pretty good day.

It was, ironically, Memorial Day.  A long weekend and I had gotten a lot done, including running the marathon in Vermont.  I was relieved to have that off my agenda, be done training and back to working on other stuff.  Like cutting up the trees I had felled in the yard. 

Then the machete glanced off a branch and I whacked myself square on the shin bone with that long, heavy, sharp blade designed for slicing. Right on the shin bone.  Nothing serious just a bit of a rent on the protective covering of skin that keeps the red stuff in. 

Editor’s note: “Rent”, to divide, usually violently or abruptly from the middle English Renden and Old English Rendan.

I staunched it with a rag from my chainsaw box and hobbled inside for some awkward first aid.  I flushed it out with Bactine and taped a bunch of gauze to it, wrapping the tape around my calf, ending up with something that you might see in an old war film or maybe an even earlier mummy movie. 

That held it in place long enough for me move enough trees out of the driveway to get my truck out.  I drove to the emergency room.

I wasn’t looking forward to the emergency room.  On a major holiday it was sure to be filled with drunken yahoos, with “hold my beer” accidents.  I brought along a book and was going to start working on this report for you in the hours of waiting that I anticipated. 

But, I was positively thrilled with service.  I barely had a chance to sit down in the squeaky, vinyl, institutional seat when I was called.  I was attended to by no less than 4 or 5 charming, enthusiastic and competent medical professionals.  It turned out that the doctor-lady on duty’s favorite thing was stitches. 

We had a great chat and I was in and out in 45 minutes!  They were impressed that I could tell them exactly how much I weighed.  They were almost as impressed with me having run a marathon in Vermont the day before as I was impressed with myself for, well…just being me.  It’s a curse.  I drove home and finished chopping up my trees. 

The next night I went to the local Red Cross and tried to give blood.  I see you rolling your eyes.  Chris, what the hell?  You run a race Sunday, your put yourself in the Emergency room Monday, why are you trying to give blood on Tuesday?  In my defence they really want my blood.  They are on me serval phone calls and emails a day about how much they want my blood.  But, I’m usually in the middle of a training cycle and can’t really afford to tapped of my basic circulatory life essence. 

Consequently, I try to schedule blood donations for after my target events.  The nerve of them.  After begging me for weeks and putting me through all the preliminaries, they turned me away when I told them of my recent forestry mishap.  Apparently there is have some silly rule about ‘no open wounds’.

I mean, you’re after my blood, wouldn’t this be a positive proof point that I’ve got some to spare?

No worries.  On to my next thing.  I like to be tightly scheduled.  I’m happiest when I have a nice pile of tasks in my que.  That’s how my weekends go in the spring and summer.  A yellow sticky pad list of chores in my pocket that I try to get done to have that warm fuzzy feeling of accomplishment from washing the car or folding the laundry or … maybe even running a race. 

Teresa had come home from the City to pick up some stuff Friday.  We had to do a bike swap. I had procured a new city bike for her.  A city bike is a bicycle that is perfectly functional but has a low value and low probability of being stolen.  The 40-year-old Schwin I had previously procured was broken.  She had managed to crank out the bearing, which is not something I’m going to fix on a bike where the tires are worth more than the bike. 

I procured a ‘new’ old bike, cleaned it up, got most of the gears working, and transferred the rack from the old-old bike Saturday morning.  As we are all destined to do, I have turned into my father. 

I had to drive her back into the city on Saturday.  I had to be in Vermont Saturday night as well.

I had packed up my race stuff.  Since I was driving, I didn’t need to be picky.  A little of this, a little of that.  I opted to go back to my old Brooks baggie shorts with the bike short liner, because they have enough pockets to carry all my standard race stuff. A couple gels, a baggie of Endurolytes, a small thing of lube.

I was trying to make the 7:00PM deadline to pick up my bib in Vermont.  Burlington is about 3 hours and change from my house.  After the side trip to the city it was going to be tight. 

The weather forecast called for clear skies Saturday slowly changing to rain in the evening, then into thunderstorms through the morning.  I try not to think too much about the weather when I’m approaching a race.  There really isn’t much you can do about it. No sense wasting your energy fretting.

It was starting to drizzle when I pulled into the race expo hotel in South Burlington with 8 minutes to spare.  I was able to get my bib and pick up a couple Expresso Love Gu’s – old-school nutrition.  In a change of pace, I got a medium shirt, instead of a large due to my current waifish deportment. 

Then I wandered off in the strengthening showers to find my campground.  My comfy rustic home to pitch my lonely tent for the evening. 

To get to my camp I was routed right by the race start/finish area. Which was nice.  The college town of Burlington sits on the edge of Lake Champlain.  The race course for the marathon is a sort of figure 8 that goes out north of the city, turns around and runs back through the city, turns again and comes back by the park again to go north, again, then comes back south along a bike trail at the edge of the lake to the finish. 

Eyeballing it on the map I thought I might be able to walk to the race start in the morning from my camp.  The bike trail that the race finishes on runs right by the edge of the campground.  I measured it to be over a mile by the road. I figured I probably wouldn’t want to hike that, especially in a storm, in the morning, and definitely wouldn’t want to hike back after the race. 

I called Brian to see what his plans were. He told me he wasn’t racing. He was running with his son Chris.  Good for him.  That completes something special for him.  Running a marathon with every one of his kids.  But, for me, I wouldn’t be able to pace with him.

Did I mention I was racing?  Yeah, I had a goal.  I was trying to spin that fitness from my Boston training cycle into a qualifying race.  I thought it would be a no-brainer.  I was in good shape.  This was supposed to be a more reasonable course.  I’d just hang on to the back of the nearest pace group to 3:30 and be done with that.  Piece of cake. 

Checking in to my camp site it was raining fairly hard now, and of course, as I unrolled my tent it started pouring.  I was trying to hurry but that just made things slower.  The way these tents work is that there isn’t a real roof.  The roof part is a screen, a mesh, to I suppose, let your foul camping breath and farts out.  But that let the rain come right through.  The way you make it watertight is to string another bit, called a fly, over the open part, which was giving me trouble in the wind. 

Picture ma trying to do all this in the pouring rain and wind.  I must’ve looked incredibly pitiful.  Hold that picture in your head next time you think hiking the Appalachian trail is a good idea.  Some guy even ran over from a neighboring camp site to help me.  At least it wasn’t dark out yet.

The good news was that I was right next to the shower & bathroom facilities buulding. The bad news was that I was right next to the shower & bathroom facilities building.  Lots of traffic. Lots of lights.  People wandering around.  I took a few minutes to pump up my mattress.

This all seemed like a great idea when I set it up last month.  Not so much now.  Soaking wet.  Pumping away in my little tent with the rain beating on the sides.

Now I’m thinking I should have some sort of meal before I crash out in my soggy hidey hole.  I did what any sentient 21st century droid would do and asked Siri for a grocery store nearby.  I was thinking maybe a Wholefoods or something similar.  But, Burlington, being an old New England Town, is filled with corner grocery stores. Basically, one room affairs with beer, chips and lottery tickets.

I was getting tired at this point, so I gave up and bought a turkey sandwich and a beer. I returned to my campground and sat in my truck, thinking how sad a spectacle I was soggy, in my truck with the rain pouring down, chewing on a gas-station sandwich.  Having paddled my canoe through these types of adventures before and thought to myself, smiling a bit, ‘this will make a great story’. 

I was worrying a bit about logistics for the morning.  I didn’t want to hike the mile plus to the start in a rainstorm.  I decided I would drive in early and find a place to park. They said there was municipal parking, but after my ‘grocery store’ adventure I wondered what that would be like, or if it even existed. 

Ce’st la vie.  Time for beddy-by. 

In normal conditions my tent, mattress and sleeping bag are pretty darn comfy.  These weren’t exactly ‘normal’. It was storming hard, with blowing wind and driving rain. I could hear the waves crashing down on the lake shore with a steady roar. The spotlights on the facilities lit up my tent like an operating theatre.

I crawled into my tent, dragging mud and water with me.  Crawled into my sleeping bag and wrapped my throw away shirt around my head like a bandage to block the light, put my phone on airplane mode and set the alarm for 5 AM. That should give me plenty of time to get ready and find a parking spot.

Now, on a normal night, in the campground, hard up against the communal bathroom, I probably would have been kept awake by the noise of the park denizens coming and going and recreating.

This was not a normal night. I considered my good fortune. The roar of the waves and the wind and the steady drum of a hard rain was like a meditation track, right?  White noise.  The song “The wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” was running slyly through my head.

“The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down

Of the big lake they called 'gitche gumee'

The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead

When the skies of November turn gloomy”

That’s when I realize that I had to pee.  At the same time I realized I would rather have my bladder explode and die of sepsis than go out int o this storm.  Then I fell asleep. 

A couple hours later I woke up to an eerie, (no pun intended), silence.  I was woken up by pause in storms.  It was a bit before 11:00 and I thought, now would be an excellent time to make a run for the facilities next door.  As I started moving around I realized that there was a fair amount of water inside my tent.  Whether it was from me bumping the sides or the rain coming sideways under the fly, I don’t know. My sleeping bag was wet. 

As I extracted myself and went to the rest room I thought that this might be a problem if the storms returned and temperature dropped a bit more.  Woke by quiet after 10.  Goodtime to pee.  Sleeping bag wet.  So, we held an executive meeting in my head and decided to sleep in the truck for the rest of the night.  It was surprisingly comfortable with my sleeping bag and the seat all the way back.  I slept great. 

My 5 AM alarm woke me to a humid, cool morning with scattered, pudgy clouds.  I was still worried about parking so I got my stuff on and drove into town.  Not only was the parking garage available and deserted, I’m pretty sure it was free.  The gate was open and the display had some sort of non-descriptive announcement. 

I didn’t have too many options for breakfast so I ate one of the SpringEnergy gels I had brought.  They’re more like baby food than race gels.  My next mission would be to find a cup of coffee somewhere. 

I took $5 with me and went out to walk around the start area. 

After a few laps I found a gas station with some coffee and checked that box.  That left me with another problem.  Now I had $3 left over that I didn’t know what to do with.  I could just drop it on the ground.  I could try to carry it.  In the end I just handed to some guy in a Bruins shirt.  He was confused.  He was pretty sure I was up to something nefarious. 

Then I just hung out in the park and stretched and relaxed.  It was partially sunny, very humid with a bit of wind and lots of puddles.  The race starts at 7:00 now, ever since the heat incident of 2 years ago.  Looking out over the lake there were towers of blackish clouds. 

As I wandered about someone called my name and it was Brian and his son.  I was glad to see them.  Glad to have someone to chat with.  We hung out and listened to the race announcements.  Bart Yasso was saying something to the assembled throng. 

There were maybe 3,000 people in the race.  Lots of 50 staters.  A nice size for a race. 

About 15 minutes before the start the announcers came on and told everyone to leave the park and take shelter in the parking garages.  Apparently one of those black clouds out over the race had us in its sites.  

The crowd filed out of the park across the street and down the road.  Brian, his son and I went into the Courtyard Hotel lobby.  We chatted with some of the folks in there, but basically stood around for 45 minutes while another small storm cell passed over. 

That’s a first for me. 

They let us go back to the race start after the danger had passed.  Speaking of passing, I got passed by Bart Yasso leaving the hotel.  I said hi but he was in a hurry to get back to the announcing. 

We found our corrals.  I hunted down the 3:30 pace leaders.  And we were off and running about 7:45.  It was a bit humid but nothing terrible.  I hung close to the pace leader and we were quickly up to pace. 

There were two pacers for 3:30.  They did a good job. They kept us within 5 seconds of the pace even with the rolling hills, the hard lefts and rights, and the slight wind.  They did something really useful.  Instead of running together one guy ran about 50 to 100 feet behind the other guy.  I started out with the lead guy but then filtered back to the second pack.  

The effort was steady but not hard.  I felt fine. 

It was hillier than I had surmised from Brian’s description.  There was one long hill back into the city that wasn’t steep but was a nice long pull.  There was a pretty good head wind in one direction.  It was useful to be in the pack and I was able to draft the pacer. 

There were some good crowds in the city but not much as you got out of town.  When the sun came through the clouds it was a little hot. 

I was staying on my nutrition, taking enough water and sipping from my bottle of F2C.  The gels they had on course were maple syrup gels.  Which is fitting for Vermont, but basically, you’re drinking pancake syrup. 

I knew the “big hill” was coming up at mile 15ish.  As we turned back towards that hill I put a little extra fuel in the fire and dropped the pace a bit.  I knew, from my training I had some faster miles in me.  I figured I’d put a little buffer between me and the pace group in case I struggled on the hill.  I thought that once I got over the hill, I could relax into the rocking chair and just glide home. 

Up to this point I was pacing well.  Not easy but not hard either.  Race pace.

The hill was a monster.  For some reason it really knocked me back on my heels.  I had to grind it out.  I lost some time but stayed ahead of the pace group.  I was suffering badly as I neared the top, but I got over it. 

On the back side of the hill I was trashed and focused on finding a recovery pace. 

My hips were tight.  My stride was painful.  That high hamstring tendonitis was biting me in the ass. 

Remember when I said I “had some good training runs and some not so good since Boston”?  Remember how I said I had somehow managed to give myself tendonitis in the ass?  Well, one of those workouts was a 20+ mile tempo run.  And what happened on that run was I got to about 16 miles and this tendonitis flared up.  It hurts.  Like some monster biting your ass.  It makes it hard to lift your legs and makes running up hills really hard.  It makes it hard to keep your stride length.  I ended up doing a fair amount of walking at the end of that workout. 

This showed up again at Vermont after the big hill about 16-17 mile in.  It wasn’t the ‘wall’ I had plenty of calories.  It wasn’t cramps, I had plenty of salt.  It was this pain in my ass that kept me from holing my pace. 

And that’s where I stopped racing and started limping in. 

In a few minutes the 3:30 pacers went by me. I said “That hill was a bitch.” 

He said, “Yeah, but it’s done now.”

I said, “Yeah, but so are my legs.”

At this point I still had about a 2-1/2 minute cushion but I could race anymore and had 8-9 miles to go.

There were still some rolling hills and each of those little rises hurt like hell. 

I threw in the towel and started walking and jogging, just to get it done. 

I ran by my camp ground a couple more times and thought about just leaving, but my truck wasn’t there, it was downtown. 

I was depressed and having dark thoughts.  I thought to myself “Now I know why those people cheat.  You can put in the work and do all the right things and what do you get?  Nothin.  That’s why they cheat.:”

I might even have had a thought or two about how I’m just getting slower and what’s the point of staying in a world that’s just a constant loss of ability? 

Such is the death march. 

When you get into the death march late in a race you notice there are people there doing the same death march pace you are.  You see them walking, stumbling, summoning the strength to run a bit, walking some more.  The comradery of zombies. 

It wasn’t awful physically.  I was fit enough to not be physically suffering.  Not like a calorie crash.  Not physical exhaustion.  My HR was fine.  I just couldn’t get my legs to turn.  And my mind had left the building.  I was done.  Done with training.  Don’t with chasing unicorns.  Done with it all.

At one point the course cuts through a wooded section in the high miles.  Just a short bit of trail to connect to road sections.  With the rain and the runners it had turned into a mud hole.  I felt bad for the runners who were still racing. 

Also, late in the race, in one of the neighborhood sections, there was a bunch of people, a couple neighborhood families handing our Budweiser pony cans.  I had no desire for a can of beer but one of the guys in front of me took one, took a sip and immediately dropped it in a big splash of foam.  The guys handing out the beers yelled at him for dropping it.  It was a bit surreal. 

Finally we found our way onto the bike path for the last couple miles back to the finish.  I came upon a guy clutch his calf, hopping around and screaming with a cramp.  I dug out the rest of my Endurolytes, gave him two and said “chew these, to get the salt into your system.”  Hope he had some water with him. 

With the late start it was pretty hot and really humid.  It didn’t impact me.  I was out of the fight before any of that would have hit me. 

As I was pulling into the finish, I was trading places with an older, grey haired woman wearing a singlet from one of the regional running clubs I know.  I thought to myself, ‘great, my finishing photo is me being out kicked by this lady!”  I wasn’t in a good place mentally. 

I managed to find a pretty fast last mile heading into the finish.  It didn’t matter.  I had turned a 2-1/2 minute buffer into a 12 minute hole with a 3:47 finish.  I got my medal and a bottle of water.  I stood around waiting to see if maybe Brian and his son weren’t close behind me since I lost so much ground.  I had passed his daughter out on the bike path and she hadn’t seen them yet. 

I saw the club singlet and congratulated her.  She turned around and said “Chris?” Turns out it was Linda one of the Goon Squad runners.  We had a long talk catching up.  She was coming off AFib surgery and starting her recovery.  The doctors had told her to quit running and it took her a long time to find a doctor who could give her a correct diagnosis and fix it. Now she’s on her way back. 

I got my truck and made my way back to the campground.  I didn’t see any reason to sleep over another night, so I broke it down and loaded up.  I stopped to tell the kid I was leaving early and he insisted on giving me my $36 back. Good Karma. 

I drove the sunny, warm day home to get back onto my list of chores. 

I must tell you I was relieved to get this race over with.  But, now I’m out of qualification and I don’t have the time or the energy for another campaign this summer.  Maybe I can’t make the standard? I don’t know.  I kills me to give up, but I’m not having fun anymore and my body is talking to me. 

I need some time off. 

It took me a few days to come to grips with not running Boston.  I’m not making any proclamations.  But, I’m ok with letting it go after 21 years.  I’m not saying I am.  I’m saying I’m ok with it. 

That’s the best I can give you coming out the back of this farce of a long weekend. 

I’m ok with it. 

“To be alive: not just the carcass / But the spark. / That’s crudely put, but … / If we’re not supposed to dance, / Why all this music?” – Gregory Orr

Direct download: Vermont2019.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 2:50pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-409 – Julie the Marathon Goddess

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4409.mp3]
Link epi4409.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to episode 4-409 of the RunRunLive Podcast.

With any luck I’ll be able to publish this before I jump in my truck and drive up to Burlington VT for my next marathon.  It’s go time and I’m stressed out about it.  I’ve held my weight and conditioning and am coming into the race in good shape, on paper anyhow.  It’s a 3.5 hour drive from my house.

Vermont Cities, I’m told, is a much more reasonable course than Boston.  Fewer hills.  My training buddies tell me that it has always been a good race for them.  It still stresses me out.  Age graded, for my goal, I’m targeting times that are faster than I ever ran when I was younger – if you believe age grading.

Looks like the weather is going to be dicey.  The race starts at 7:00 AM so I shouldn’t have to worry about heat.  But, they are calling for thunder storms and a stiff wind in the morning.  Doesn’t matter.  I’m committed.  I’ll fight it all the way down.

It’s a figure 8 course.  I’m not sure how sheltered it is, but that should mean I’ll have as much head wind as tail wind and side wind.  I’m going to find a pace group and stick with it.  Stay in the shadow of the pace group.

I need a 3:35 to requalify and it looks like they have a 3:30 pace group.  I’ll have to decide whether I want to hang with them or freewheel.  10 seconds a mile could be significant and I’d much rather negative split than burn out.  We’ll see.

I’m camping in a park on the lake front.  Like I said it’s a trick I learned in my mountain bike racing days.  Frankly, I don’t think those hard-core mountain bikers are house-trained.  I’ve got a tent, a mattress and a mattress pump in the back of my truck.  You don’t sleep much the night before a race anyhow.  Eyeballing the map, it looks like I can walk to the start from where I’m camped.

Brian is going to be up there with his son.  I’m going to stay over Sunday night probably.  We’ll see.

I can’t wait to have this over with.  I’m pretty sick of road racing and training.  Not sure what I’m going to do if I miss my time.  I might hang it up.  Move on.  What would you do?  Do you think 21 Boston marathons is enough?  Or will my life totally unravel if I remove this prop from the infrastructure?

Today we have a great interview with Julie the Marathon Goddess.  You know Julie.  She’s the California Girl from the move “The Spirit of the Marathon 2”.  Which isn’t an awful movie.  The reason it’s not awful is that it has a cast of characters and Julie is one of those characters.

In section one I’m going to talk about some new things I learned in this last training cycle.  In section two I’m going to talk about the wild and whacky English Language.

And, since we’re talking about the English language and the Boston Marathon I have a question for you?  What is another perfectly good word for ‘unicorn’?  Monocerous!  Isn’t that a great word.  Monocerous!

Here’s another one.  Did you know that the word Cadence comes from the same Indo-European root as Cadaver?  Same Latin root meaning, loosely to fall.  The cadence is the foot fall.  The cadaver is a fallen one, so to speak.  So next time you can’t keep up your cadence and you feel like a cadaver, you’ll know why.

Oh, I have a redaction from last show.  My childhood friend Dave didn’t die.  He’s living in Seattle I think.  His older brother Eric, who I went to school with passed.  Rest in Peace Eric.

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

    • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

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Section one – LEssons from this long training cycle. http://runrunlive.com/what-i-learned-from-this-extended-training-cycle

Voices of reason – the conversation

Julie Weiss

Author/Runner/Marathon Goddess 

www.marathongoddess.com

 

Available now on Amazon:

52 Weeks, 52 Marathons: The Miles and Trials of a Marathon Goddess by Julie Weiss with John Hanc and Ali Nolan (Tender Fire/Enhanced Communications)

 

Do you ever wonder, or have a burning desire to be more than what you have aspired to be? I always knew there was more to life, and I found it through my joy of running.

Before I started running I was overweight, on antidepressants and I could barely run around the block. I was a young mom and had battled some very dark moments. Since I started running I am no longer taking any medication and I have lost 20 pounds. Running saved my life. On March 2, 2008, I ran my first marathon, the Los Angeles Marathon. I had made all the beginner mistakes. Ouch! Pretty much sums it up. I had not trained properly, and swore I would stick only to 10K’s after that. But it was not long, two months in fact, until I ran another marathon and then another. My father became my biggest fan. We had a goal, that goal was that I would qualify for the Boston marathon where he would go to see me run. I attempted to qualify for Boston 19 times. Every time I completed a marathon I would call my father and let him know how I did. He was still proud of me, even if it was my slowest time. He always encouraged me to keep going and so I did. In October of 2010, my father was diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. I was devastated, but my father urged me to continue to train, to work and go on with life as usual. It was hard, but I did as he wished. On December 5, 2010 I finally did qualify for the Boston marathon and made it in 3:47, sadly it was 1 week after my father passed away, just 35 days after his diagnosis. I know he was there with me, he was the wind at my back and had the best seat in the house, my heart. After I ran the Boston marathon in 2011 I looked deeply into the disease that had taken my father. I found that pancreatic cancer was the 4th leading cause of cancer death and the least funded for research. This was unacceptable to me. I knew had to something dramatic to raise awareness and that it should be centered around my passion for running and the love for my father. So I set out to run 52 marathons in 52 weeks to raise $1,000,000 for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. I recently completed marathon#52 on March 17, 2013 at the ASICS L.A. Marathon. I did all of this while holding down a full time job. I work 9-5 as an accountant. I would leave my office on a Friday or Saturday, travel to a different city, state or even country, run a marathon on Sunday and fly back home to get to work Monday morning. Almost every weekend waking up at 3:30 in the morning to get to the starting line. Not even Super Storm Sandy could stop me. I dedicated each of my marathons to someone affected by pancreatic cancer because my fight was nothing compared to what theses people had to go through. They are my heroes. I am now 42, have two amazing kids, who are 20 and 24, my wonderful fiance, and of course my first running partner ever, my dog Jessie. I have found my purpose in life. Now, I invite you to join me in the light, embrace your highest self and start being the person you were put on this earth to be. If it speaks to you, I also invite you to join me in the fight against pancreatic cancer. The disease that took the life of my number 1 fan, my father, and so many others. I am so grateful that we have completed this amazing journey, but we are not done yet.  I am currently on a journey to finish 100 marathons ending at the 2016 Sketchers Performance Los Angeles Marathon and hope to reach my 1 Million dollar fundraising goal by then. When you do what you love, for those you love, that is when the miracles happen. The joy comes from the heart. If your love is running, I have learned that it’s not about how many miles you go, or even how fast. The heart does not have a clock, it has beats. My mission is to make sure those beats are spent on pursuing your dreams, your passions and having fun. Marathon Goddess is about embracing the God or Goddess within us all. Now I am running with a purpose, to fight the good fight against pancreatic cancer. It has become my mission, and I will not stop until we have found a cure. Find your passion, bring out your spirit and let it shine. We got this!!

https://marathongoddess.com/about-us/

Section two – The Wonderful, Wacky, English Language - http://runrunlive.com/the-wonderful-english-language

 

Outro

Well, my friends you did that thing where you strike the Goddess pose in your underwear in front of the bathroom mirror and though tno one was watching, but we won’t judge and you have come to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-409, Keep up the good work.

We’ve been having a cold and rainy spring in New England.  Every time I hit one of those long hard tempo runs in a 45 degree drizzle I mutter a little curse to the gods.  Why couldn’t we have this weather at one of my target marathons?

I’ve been working in my garden for the last couple weeks.  I started some seeds earlier but the weather has been so cold they are quite stunted.  I got some tomatoes and beans and squash in.  We’ll see what come up.  Nothing like a warm, garden fresh tomato on a warm August afternoon.

Part of the rhythm of life.

I should be able to execute a decent race at Vermont.  I’m still light – hovering around 170 pounds – I’m still hitting my tempo paces in the mid-7’s.  Like, I said, on paper it’s a lock.  We’ll see.  Wish me luck. Send me whatever universal Karma you can.

I accepted an invitation to pace a ½ marathon in PA at the end of July.  It’s the Conquer the Canyon marathon and half marathon.  I’ll be the alternate pacer for the 2 hour ½ with Greg.  Light duty.

It looks like a pretty course on a rail trail that winds through a river valley.  6-hour drive for me.  This pacing outfit is called Beast Pacers.  If you want to be a pacer they have races all over the country.  They comp you the entry.  Would be a great way to pick up your 50 states.

One more of my favorite old-English words for you before you go.  The old/middle English word for window or opening was ‘thirl’.  You may be familiar with a compound word we still use this in.  It combines the word for ‘nose’ and that word for window ‘thirl’ – and you may have guessed – that compound word is ‘nostril’ – literally ‘nose-window’.  Isn’t that great?  Nose window?

Julie’s story is a good one.  On the one hand it’s familiar to us.  It’s the classic hero’s journey.  Over coming challenges to become the champion.  On the other I think it verifies a useful truth: if you just decide to do something you can change the world, at least your little part of the world.  You don’t need permission.  You just do it and let the details figure themselves out.

It’s not goal setting.  It’s not achievement.  It’s more like directing, or freeing the universal energy that is in each of us.

Looking inside yourself, how do you let that energy free?

I’ll see you out there.

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4409.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 4:28pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-408 – Bill Endures

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4408.mp3]
Link epi4408.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to episode 4-408 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

Well, folks it’s been almost a month since Boston, so let’s get back on track, back in the saddle and do some serious podcasting!  Grr…

I’m sitting in the Starbucks, one of the two Starbucks that is on my work commute route.  My hands are a bit cold.  I road my motorcycle this morning.  It’s in the low 40’s but sunny.  I like to stop and write for small patched of time in the morning at these oases of warmth and humanity. 

I’ve got some calls that I’ll take from here and then I’ll wander into my office later.  

Today we’ve got a great chat with Bill who is one of those crunchy, old ultra-runners who have done everything.  I was interested in how he did his cross country run and he definitely has a view point on it!

In section one we’ll talk about working through a post event funk.  In section two I’ll keep pounding away on the big, navel-gazing topics of Eckhart Tolle’s book. 

I’m training, actually in my taper for Vermont.  I have had some good workouts and some not-so great workouts.  In general I’ve kept the weight off and my training paces are good.  I’ve got some high-hamstring-attach point challenges that I’m trying to rehab through. 

The challenge with extended training cycles on the road is that they tend to get very specific and make you fragile.  Somehow this long cycle has made my hips and glutes a bit weak and they go on me in the high miles.  It’s the same old story, lower the water level and you find new rocks.  Keep training and you’ll find new weak points. 

So I’m working through that. 

We talked for awhile, but I’ll save the updates for the Outro. 

I will tell one story.  It’s a story about a giant, half-eaten catfish.  When I was in elementary school, so 8, 9, 10 years old I had a best friend whose name was Dave. 

We built a fort in the rafters of my Dad’s garage one summer and decorated it with stickers from Mad Magazine.  I can remember listening to “Ricky Don’t Loose That Number” by Steely Dan on the pop station, which would make it 1975ish. 

I’d go over to Dave’s house on the weekends and we’d disappear into the woods and roads around his house to go exploring.  We would wander over to the train tracks and put pennies on the tracks for the trains to smoosh, things like that. 

One time we were out on the power lines behind his house, the same power lines that I ride my mountain bike on and do long trail runs on now.  It was this time of year – spring in New England. 

What happens in spring is we get the melt and a lot of rain and the ponds, rivers and swamps all fill up with water.  For instance, I have a little pond in my back yard, right now that only exists this time of year. 

Anyhow we were wandering through this patch of swamp that had recently been a pond and we came across a giant catfish, high a dry, with a bit missing from the scavengers.  Too bad we didn’t’ have Instagram back then.  Here was this enormous fish, as if dropped form the sky by aliens into the middle of a field.  That’s a 50-60 year-old fish that took a wrong turn somewhere. 

I’ll always remember that image in my internal Instagram, which is probably much better than the actual picture anyhow.

I tell this story because my Mom called to tell me Dave died this week.  I hadn’t spoken to him in decades.  BNot to be morbid, but I want you to understand and appreciate today as a gift.  We’re all winning.  We are all in extra innings and you and I are blessed.  Don’t waste it. 

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

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Section one – Warning Lights - http://runrunlive.com/paying-attention-to-your-warning-lights

Voices of reason – the conversation

Bill Schultz

Not sure what you're looking for as far as links and articles, but I've included a few below.

I started running in 1978 and ran my 1st ultra in 1979.  Ran my 1st 24Hr around 1982 and my 1st 6 Day race in 1984.  My best was in 1989 when I won with 475 miles. The next year, 1990, I took a sabbatical from teaching and ran a US Trascon water to water in 95 days. (Huntington Beach, CA to Atlantic City, NJ.  I've been Co-RD for the Dawn To Dusk To Dawn Track Ultras (D3) since 1984. This year's race will be the 24th edition.  Along with my own running, I've been helping Mike Melton time ultras from 100K to 6 Days around the country (13 last year).

 

Attached are some Articles that came out back in 1989 and 1990 regarding my Transcon and my best 6 Day race.

Here are a few links.  

 

https://karenputz.growingbolder.com/bill-schultz-ultra-running-is-his-passion/

http://collingdale.blogspot.com/2012/09/profile-bill-schultz-runner-and-educator.html

http://chesterspirit.com/2017/03/ex-southeast-delco-teacher-is-a-record-setting-star-runner/

 

Section two – No-Mind - http://runrunlive.com/space-and-time-are-an-illusion

 

Outro

Well, my friends you called ahead, made your plans and safely ran across the nation in record time to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-408, nmaybe it’s tome to retire?  Don’t get caught in a funk!

Enochs results

Like I said I am in a short training cycle for the Vermont City Marathon.  There’s just no way I’m going to walk away without my qualifying time this spring.  I’m in too good shape. 

If you’re going to be up there let me know and we’ll say high.  I’m going to pitch a tent in the park there for a couple nights.  It’s something I learned from mountain bike racing.  Just pitch a tent you’ll be fine!

I got a new Garmin, a 235.  I’ll give you a write up at some point.  I’m still figuring it out, but I like it so far. 

One quick story / iPhone tip for you to take you out. 

I have an iPhone 6s.  like it.  I listen to podcasts and music on it.  When I drive to work I tend to listen to podcasts.  Now, for some reason, when I plug in the phone to the radio I put in my truck, it decides to start playing the first song, alphabetically in the song list on my phone. 

The first song alphabetically in the song list on my phone was a really aggressive punk rock number called “Already Dead” by Rancid. 

The challenge I had was that some of the podcasters I listen to, and I won’t name any names, haven’t figured out how to level their audio.  You have to turn them way up to hear them. 

The result, as you may have guessed by now, was that I’d get blown out of my seat a couple times a week when I plugged in my phone for the ride to work.  It was like having an audio bomb go off in the truck! 

Eventually I was moved to engineer a solution.  I downloaded a really mild morning meditation and renamed it lower case aaaaaaa-filename…. Now I am greeted by a lovely, low and soothing voice encouraging me to embrace the day.  It’s much better.  And if someone is in the car with me I get to tell this story. 

As a corollary, I also changed the my alarm to wake up in the morning on my iPhone to be an compilation of inspirational “seize the day!” type speeches. 

If you want me to walk you through the how to’s just shoot me a note.

And I’ll see you out there.

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4408.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 10:26am EDT

Boston 2019

All in – my  21st Boston Marathon

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/Boston2019.mp3]
Link  Boston2019.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

I didn’t sleep great the night before.  Part of it was the driving rain and the thunder and lightning that shook the house.  Part of it was my ruminating brain. 

You might think that having such a great training cycle would allow me to rest easy. But, no, it somehow raised the stakes.  My trusty subconscious was chattering away.  What if after all this work I managed to screw up the race? What if the weather was bad? 

Of course I tied to let my big brain take over and talk myself down from the window ledge.  I am grateful to be here. Yeah.  I am happy to still be doing this 20+ years in?  Yeah.  I am blessed?  Yeah. 

Blah, blah, blah…

After 20 years you’d think I’d be able to rationalize.  Repetition doesn’t lower the stakes.  This is the Boston Marathon.  It matters to me.  I put in the work.  I qualify.  It matters. 

It matters to me.

I rolled out of bed reasonably refreshed and put on my throw-away clothes.  With the lingering rain I didn’t want to wear my race stuff, especially my shoes.  Stay dry as long as possible.  I had time to take a nice shower and have a bit of breakfast.  A normal day at the Russell house. 

My wife dropped me off at the local Starbucks where I caught a ride with some of the folks from my running club out to Hopkinton. 

Without incident I hopped the spectator bus to downtown Hopkinton and made my way over to the senior center to join Eric and the St. Louis runners.  My second year of avoiding Athletes’ Village. Call me soft, but warm and dry with a bathroom beats ankle deep mud and a 45 minute porta-john line. 

I stretched and rubbed and pre-gamed.  Got my race gear on and lubed up really well.  With the humidity and warmer temps I figured chaffing might be an issue. 

I ran in my old Hoka Cliftons, split shorts and a race singlet.  Nothing fancy.  I wore the Boston Strong hat I had bought at the expo.  I felt like that was an appropriate message for my training cycle and my race plan. 

Like Coach said in his pep talk to me;  it didn’t matter if it was 100 degrees or if there were 80 mile an hour winds.  I was not going to waste this training cycle.  No matter what happened I was committed.  I wasn’t giving myself any option to give up or to ease off.  No matter what I was all in.  I would control the only thing any of us really controls; my commitment to fight – to be strong. 

We watched the early waves start on TV.  We saw the wheelchair finish, which seemed a bit strange to see people finish a race you are an hour away from starting.  In the room were several faster, red-bib, wave 2 runners.  That seemed to be the demographic in general.  Lots of fit, young, fast runners in Nike Vapor Fly’s and a handful of us old war horses. 

Eric and I were in the same wave and corral.  3/3, which put us up the hill not far from the start line. Without hurry we made our way over when the time was right.

It’s an electric time.  Walking to the start of the Boston marathon.  If you could somehow drop an emotional energy meter into the center of Hopkinton Massachusetts it would be bouncing off the rails and maxing out. 

Thousands of qualified athletes stepping into the culmination of their training cycles.  Each one a story of dedication and perseverance and, right now, in this very moment, at their emotional peak.  This is it.  The big test.  The qualification effort is well in the past.  The months of training and sacrifice all leading in an inevitable emotional march to this day and this moment. 

The atmosphere buzzes like an electric field. 

Eric and I made our way out of the senior center in the misty, post-rain, cool, overcast morning.  The sun was struggling to break through the remnants of the storms that had passed.  We walked the short trek to Main Street and the bottom of the hill where the first half of the corrals take a turn back towards athletes’ village.

As we cleared security to access the melee of runners trying to find corrals I ran straight into Alett.  This is one of the alternate universe characteristics of Boston.  If you are trying to meet people on purpose, you can’t find them.  But, you randomly run into people you know, for no predictable or probable reason in the crowd of 30,000 athletes.  I gave her a hug.  We had a few words. 

Eric and I continued our hike up the hill towards the start line to find our apportioned 3rd corral.  Corral 3 is close to the actual start line.  We got to the opening just before our wave start time and ended up in the back of the corral just as they pulled the ropes and the corral 4 runners flooded in to fill the gap. 

And like that we were off again, bounding down the steep hill out of Hopkinton, heading towards another date with destiny. 

I went into my training cycle angry.  It was mid-October and I had just jogged off the course at Baystate after one lap.  I thought I would have the legs after that big training cycle volume over the summer training for the Burning River 100 mile ultra.  But, I could not hold the pace at Baystate and gave up. 

There wasn’t a lot of urgency in that race.  I was already qualified.  I could run another if I wanted to.  I let my big brain rationalize me off the course. 

Ultra-training was all about multi-hour runs in the trails.  Great for fitness, great for peace of mind, but not great for racing marathons.  While putting in those 90+ mile long training weeks I didn’t pay much attention to nutrition or flexibility.  I paid no attention to speed and tempo work. 

Coming into the late summer I was tipping the scales in the mid-180’s.  That’s not obese for me, but it is some extra weight.  I have discovered that as I age, I’m losing body mass in general so my old race weights aren’t something I can compare against.  Instead I look at body fat % as a decent proxy for excess.  Late summer I was up in the 12-13% body fat. 

The extra weight doesn’t matter when you’re ambling around in the woods, in fact it’s probably an advantage, but it sucks to carry when you’re trying to run fast circles on a track or hard charges up a hill. 

Trying to tune up for that race in the fall I noticed that I really struggled with speed and tempo.  My legs weren’t cooperating.  My turnover was pathetic, and I had no pop. 

That’s when I got a bit angry.  I knew I had work to do. 

Talking with Coach, after the race, he convinced me to not try to race again and to focus on Boston, still 5 months in the future.  I committed, to get lean, to get healthy and to go into my 2019 Boston training cycle with a higher level of commitment.  To see what I could do. 

Running a qualifying time has never been easy for me. I’m not that naturally talented athlete who glides by the standards.  I struggle and work to barely scrape by.  The BAA has helpfully lowered the standard by 10 minutes over the last few years and that struggle to scrape by is even more scrapier.  I need to meet the same standard today as I did two age groups ago. 

And so it began…I worked my diet and worked my plan through the holidays.  Dropping those first 10 pounds and working daily on my tight hamstrings and quads.  I came into this training cycle lean and fit.  By the end of this cycle I was hovering around 170 pounds and 9% body fat.  I was getting good sleep and I was healthy. 

Bringing this health into my training cycle enabled me to hit paces I haven’t seen in 10 years. It enabled me to attack workouts that I would have walked away from in previous cycles.  I had the quality, if not the volume, I needed to do well. 

Like I said.  I’m quite proud of this training cycle.  I feel like it was a major lifestyle change for me.  I’m also cognizant of the fact that I’m not a 20-year-old (or a 30-year-old…or a 40-year-old) anymore and this kind of intensity may not be the best choice for longevity in this sport. 

I was dead set on sticking to my plan.  I was not going to go out too fast.  I was going to stick to 8 minute miles or slower.  My strategy was to make it through the hills with enough juice left to close the race.

Maybe it was because we started at the back of the corral, but it seemed very crowded in the beginning.  We crossed the first mile mark at somewhere around an 8:24 pace, successfully resisting the pull of the hills. 

Again, from the random encounter files, Frank, one of my training partners tapped me on the shoulder and congratulated me for not going out too fast.  I was glad to see him, but I turned around and he was gone, running his own race. 

I say ‘somewhere around an 8:24 pace’ because my Garmin was off the mile marks from the start and got worse as the race progressed.  I ended up off my 3 tenths of a mile.  Which is a lot.  It’s close to 3 minutes discrepancy at the finish. 

The next few miles brought our average down to right around 8:03 official at the first 5Kmark.  Which was right where I wanted to be.  We were running smart.  According to the official BAA timers we were right on our target splits. At 5K and at 10K.

My legs didn’t feel great.  There have been times at Boston that early in the race I can feel that ‘pop’ in my legs.  This wasn’t one of those.  I knew it was going to be a work day, but I was committed to the work.  I wasn’t going to waste this training.  No matter what I was going to work my plan – all the way. 

The race felt very crowded this year, especially in the water stops.  People were bumping and pushing and getting knocked off pace in those early tables.  

Eric started grumbling about it ‘not being his day’ but I pushed back and said all we have to do is hold this pace and get to the top of that hill.  Hold this pace and make it to the top of Heartbreak.  That’s the plan and I was working my plan – come hell or high water – all in. 

We were taking water at every aid station because it was a bit warmer than it should have been and we wanted to stay ahead of it.  I got a couple endurolytes down at around the 10K point.  It was still overcast and wasn’t uncomfortable. 

I had a couple gels with me that I had tried to pin to the waistline of my shorts.  I had no ither way to carry them, except in my hands.  I was going to tuck them inside my shorts but that didn’t feel right so I let them hang outside and flop around.  At one point I had a guy say “You’re going to lose those gels” and one did break free, but I got the other one through the first hour and choked it down. 

With the warmer weather I was a bit concerned about my gut.  I knew I had to stay on top of the water and fuel but by doing so also risked nausea from too much.  Again, when you’re racing at your threshold pace your body doesn’t like to digest stuff too. 

Some where before the 10-mile mark I turned around and Eric was gone.  Off to run his own race.  Now I had to pace myself and execute my plan. 

Through the half I was right on pace, with even a couple faster miles.  According to my watch I was a bit faster than the race splits and that difference would end up being significant.  My watch splits were probably 5 seconds a mile off my race clock splits. 

We pulled through Wellesley and the scream tunnel.  I stayed to the middle of the road to not get tangled up.  I remember seeing some young men mixed in with the Coeds and hoping this wasn’t a trend.  I was pacing a couple guys around my age who looked like they were on the same mission.  But, one of them had this annoying habit of going much faster on the downhills and I moved on. 

Somewhere around Wellesley the clouds cleared and the full sun came out.  Not terribly warm, but full sun, calm and around 70. 

The weather was a big story this year at Boston as it usually is.  It wasn’t a major issue, but it was a big story.  A week out it was forecast to be raging thunderstorms, rain and wind like we had last year.  The race officials moved up the wave 4 start to get people out of athletes’ village and onto the course a bit sooner. 

As the race got closer the forecast changed to 60’s, rain and significant tailwind.  This forecast held right up to the race.  The only thing that changed as the days clicked by was that the temperatures were predicted to creep up to close to 70. 

Still, drizzly with a stiff tail wind sounded pretty good to me. 

The dynamic was, as it usually is, that Boston is the last stop for any storm train that rolls across the country.  Typically, these come through in waves, or fronts.  When you look at a weather forecast for New England it really depends on where these storm fronts are, how fast they are moving and what’s on either side. 

That’s why this year was so squirrely.  We had two energetic systems sweeping across the country and as good as our weather technology is it’s a guess as to when the fronts show up and when they leave.  The first traveler was a warm front with tropical downpours.  Then on the heels of that one was a cold front with another line of rain and high winds.  This is all in the same 24 hour period. 

Depending on a couple hours or a shift in the storm path you could get rain, wind, warm, cold or sunny skies and/or calm.  That’s why you’ll hear people say they got all 4 seasons during the race this year.  That’s why, even the night before, we didn’t know what we were getting. 

What we ended up getting was the tropical storm early with lots of rain, warm temps and wind.  That’s what woke me up the night before. 

As the out of town runners made their way out on the buses to Athetes’ village they had to deal with these tropical downpours, thunder and lightning. 

As the waves started to go off this weather calmed and it was overcast, wet and calm.  Still this early rain turned the Hopkinton Highschool fields in athletes’ village into a medieval mud bath again for the waiting athletes.  By the time my wave, wave 3 went off it was overcast, warmish and humid with very little wind. 

As I started the race in corral 3 wave 3 it was mid-60’s, calm, overcast and humid – not bad racing weather.  But, as we got into Wellesely and the hills in Newton the sun came out.  It was 70, full sun and no wind.  A bit warm for us but not horrible. 

Ironically, after all the storms and dire forecasts, all the New Englanders got a touch of sunburn on their virgin skin.  Those poor people from out of town who packed their winter gear in anticipation of Armageddon got a nice, warm and sunny New England day. 

Then that second front, the one with the rain and tailwinds, came through right after we finished.

By the time I finished the clouds were coming in again.  It started raining and gusting walking to the hotel.  When I left for the train a couple hours later (after a shower and rehydrating) the temperature had dropped and there was a biting wind in the city. 

All four seasons in one day. 

The net result was, at least for we wave 2-3 runners, we hit the gap exactly between storm fronts and ran on a clear, windless, slightly too warm, spring day. 

Did it impact my race?  I don’t know.  It was a bit warmer than I like and there was no tail wind.  It certainly didn’t help, and I’ve heard a lot of people blaming it, for poor performances, but it wasn’t awful.  Probably more of a convenient excuse than a causative factor.

That’s Boston. 

After the sun came out and we passed through the scream tunnel the next major landmark is the drop down into Newton Lower Falls and the start of the hills, with ‘hill zero’ climbing up over 128. 

It was in this section where I started to feel a bit funky.  I had a classic power loss moment and it freaked me out.  This is too early in the race to be having power loss.  All those negative thoughts started swirling.  I shut them off and recommitted to fighting it all the way. 

I took another gel and that did the trick.  I felt human again.  Just in time for the hills.  I worked my downhill form down the steep hill into Newton Lower Falls and refocused on getting to the top of Heartbreak. 

I did great job of reeling my mind in.  Each time my head started to go sideways I would refocus on what I was doing right now.  My mantra became “Run the mile you’re in”.  And I kept working. 

I lost 10 seconds or so on that slow mile but according to my watch I had a couple minutes in the bank for the hills so I wasn’t going to let up. 

And that’s the trick at Boston.  How do you go fast enough in the beginning that you don’t fall behind your pace and have a bit of buffer for the hills, while at the same time not burning out your legs in the process? 

I was right on my plan.  It was a work day but I was on my plan.  According to my watch I could give a couple minutes back and still make my time.  Maybe not my A goal but certainly my B goal.

Hill zero was hard but manageable.  After you get over the highway they are handing our gels again so I grabbed on of those for later.  I was keeping my water intake up, but not really drinking much of the F2C I was carrying in my bottle.  Mostly because it was warm by now and my stomach was a bit nasty.  I couldn’t summon the energy to dig my Endurolytes out but figured I was getting enough from the gels and occasional sip from my bottle. 

We turned by the Fire House and I was grinding away, staying on pace.  The uphills didn’t feel great but my downhill pace was nice a strong.  It was still work and I wasn’t having a great day but I thought I was managing it well.  I was running the mile I was in and focused on getting to the top of Heartbreak.

Hill one wasn’t bad and I ran really well off the back of it to recover.  This was very positive for me because many years this is the spot where the race completely unravels.  Around 18 miles in before you even get to Heartbreak. 

Hill 2 was a bit harder, but again I recovered well and ran smoothly on the back side.  Then we were into Heartbreak  I wasn’t looking at my watch anymore.  I was all in, working as well as I could and staying as close to pace as I could, looking to get to the top of that hill and reap the benefits of the downhills and flats into the finish. 

I took a quick walk of the water table before entering the hill to get my head right and started to climb. 

I raised my head and looked up that ½ mile climb and I got back to work.

My training and preparation were excellent.  The only blip was that I had a business conference in Chicago the final week of my taper going into the race.  I ate too much and drank too much beer, got bad sleep and spent way too much time on my feet.  That shouldn’t have been enough to unravel the total quality of my training, but it may have been one of the small factors influencing my race.

My legs were a bit tight and I was a bit jetlagged and heavy as I rested out the weekend before the race. 

Since I was flying back from Chicago Friday morning anyhow, I figured I’d swing by the expo and pick up my bib.  I usually go in Saturday, but this seemed convenient and I really wanted to get off my feet and rest for the remainder of the time I had left. 

I dragged my travel bags onto the train and made my way over to the Hynes at the Pru for the expo.  There was no line at the bib pickup.  I cruised right through without breaking stride.  When I turned into the shirt pickup room there was a long line. Luckily, instead of just joining the line I asked someone what the line was for.  Apparently, it was for people to take a photo of themselves in front of a particular wall banner. 

I skipped that line and cruised through shirt pickup without breaking stride. 

There were people and family groups taking pictures all around with their bibs and shirts. There were people immediately taking the shirts out and trying them on for fit so they could exchange if necessary. 

All these people were just so excited to be there.  They were clutching and fawning in the symbols and idolatry of the moment.  So many stories, all different, but all the same too.  They worked so hard to get here and now they were celebrating and in awe of the moment

I made my way over to the expo.  This is where the crowds were. There was a veritable feeding frenzy at the Adidas official gear booth.  Crowds of runners pawing through the over-priced merch and a line to check out that would make Disney proud. 

I didn’t see anything I liked.  I usually buy a hat, but all the racing hats had the logo as a stuck-on chunk of plastic, not stitched in, so I passed.  None of the shorts looked like anything I’d want to wear either, so I skipped that line too and moved on. 

The Expo seemed smaller than usual.  A bit underwhelming and disappointing. There were the usual big shoe companies and such.  There was the theater showing the race course run through video which is always popular.   On the negative side there seemed to be a lot of ancillary, what I might call, “late night TV products”.  Various potions and devices guaranteed by someone to do something. 

On the good side there were two beer booths.  The Sam Adams guys had a large presence and runners were happily consuming the 26.2 brew specially made for the race.  And Zelus, the beer for runners out of western Mass had a booth.

I might suggest that they consider the expo at Boston as part of the character of the race and find a way to do better.  Maybe get people and products in that fit our lifestyle.  I’m sure it’s just a financial thing, they fill the space with whoever is willing to pay.  How about setting aside booth space for something more intrinsic to our demographic? How about authors?  Important charities? Or maybe to good races? Or maybe some science-based products?  Maybe I’m over thinking it.

My legs were pretty shitty at as I went into the ascent of Heartbreak.  Even after all those awesome sets of hill repeats I had donei n training I couldn’t find that gear, that energy and strength, so instead of slowing to a shuffle I switched to a fast-hike, run cadence, an ultra-running trick, to save my legs and not lose too much time. 

My legs were really heavy and refused to climb well but I worked through to the top of the hill.  I figured that was my time buffer.  Now I had to hang on to close to race pace to have any chance of making my time. 

Coming off the hill I relaxed and again had good downhill form and effort.  I felt comfortable.  I figured I was really close to my goal pace and just had to keep hitting it. I kept running the mile I was in.  I thought I carried a couple minute buffer at least into the hills, so even if I lost a minute or two, I would still be close. 

The course started to take its toll on the runners.  The pack was looser here but runners would be stopping or weaving or sitting on the side of the road and you had to watch out or bump your way through.  I saw two runners being packed onto stretchers by EMTs.  I pushed on.

In my head I thought I could just stay close.  All in.  keep fighting.  It was work.  I wasn’t terribly uncomfortable.  I was able to maintain close to goal pace on the downs and flats in the that last 10K.  I felt strong rolling down that hill with the train tracks into Cleveland Circle. 

Then, I looked up to see the 24 mile sign, and, out of habit, looked at my watch.  My Garmin said almost exactly 3:20.  Even with my addled brain I could do the math.  I would have to run the last 2.21 miles in 15 minutes to get my time.  I had been battling to hold on to 8:10’s in these last miles, thinking I had some buffer.  But, battling as I was, there was no way I was going to lay down a couple sub-7:30’s at that point. 

The wind came out of my sails.  I let my foot off the gas.  I reminded myself to lift my head up and look around.  The screaming crowds, the Citgo sign, the mile to go, the right on Herford, the left on Boylston.  The crowd on Boylston like a living, screaming animal pulling you in to the finish. 

I let myself be in that moment.  I finished easy in 3:40:19 according to the BAA timer.  A full five minutes off my B goal time.  As near as I can figure, with my watch being so far off the race splits I did not have that 2-3 minute buffer going into the hills.  I probably only had 45 seconds to a minute. 

When I lost those 2-3 minutes in the hills, combined with a couple slower miles where I was 5 or 10 seconds off pace at the end I was in the hole coming off Heartbreak.  I didn’t have the juice to negative split it in.  In those final miles where I was working to stay close to race pace I really needed to be negative splitting.  Of those 5 minutes I missed by, ½ of that is real and half of that is me taking my time to enjoy the last 2miles of the race.

..

In these last few days since the race I struggle with how to write and talk about it.  I suppose that’s the defining characteristic of this race – that it refuses to play along and be categorized.  On the one hand I feel blessed and awed to be able to be part of this great thing.  On the other I have mixed feelings about how I haven’t had a great race there in almost a decade. 

That’s why I like to let these things sit a bit before I try to write it up.  Let something that makes sense congeal into narrative and form.  Come to some sort of conclusion.  Some sort of tidy summary to stamp a smiley face on the report before turning it in for grading. 

This week, since the race, I’ve been waking up early.  I don’t know why.  Maybe it’s the early rising sun of late spring.  Maybe it’s the damage in my legs.  Maybe it’s my unsettled mind.  I’m typically blessed with clarity in mornings so why not work on this report for you?  Let’s see if we can’t benefit from an early release of green, fresh thoughts still weeping sap from the fresh cuts.

The summary statement, if one can ever summarize a Boston Marathon race, is I’m happy with my training effort, I’m happy with my racing effort, I think I executed my plan well, but I’m a bit disappointed with my results. 

Here are the two sides of that coin; I missed my A goal by 10 minutes, and I missed my B goal by 5 minutes.  Now I’m out of qualification.  Flip that over and you find that I trained well, executed my plan, worked hard and didn’t give up.  Relatively I did very well.  But, relatively doesn’t get you entry into next year’s race. 

How can I say that relatively I did well?  That’s quite simple.  Since Boston is a seeded race all you need to do is to look at how you performed vis-à-vis your bib number.  For every finishing spot you beat your bib number by you finished better than someone who qualified with a better time than you did. 

I beat my bib number by 6,595 places.  Even if you throw out the outliers it’s obvious I had a much better day than many of my cohort.  It was my training, my execution and my pure stubbornness that enabled me to do so. 

Part of me wonders just what I have to do to have a break out race at Boston.  Part of me wonders if I have anything left I can do.  Part of me wonders if maybe I just don’t have the ability to pull it off anymore.  And, of course, part of me wonders why I care so much?  Really? What is it about this race that turns me into a neurotic mess once a year?

Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t have a terrible race. I’m not jumping out the window with remorse.  I’m just stressed out, because I controlled everything I could, I did everything I could, and it still wasn’t enough for Boston. 

Based on my training paces I should have hit my A goal of breaking 3:30 and should have easily hit my B goal of 3:35.  But that didn’t happen.  I crossed that line with a hard fought 3:40:19.  I am beat up and sore.  I executed my plan but those training paces and that training fitness weren’t enough for Boston.

I worked hard.  I worked my plan.  And I never gave up.  I’m proud of the effort. There were times in this race where I was struggling and I was able to pull myself together, focus on the mile I was in, and keep racing. 

It was probably the depth and quality of my training that allowed me to fight back.  A positive spin on it might be that without that training and execution it would have been a real train wreck. 

So here we are, Dear Reader, out of qualification.  As my training buddies and I joke there is not way to gracefully disengage from Boston. If you have a good race, you’re qualified and might as well run.  If you don’t you’re pissed off and don’t want to end on a down note.  Either way you’re back on the neurotic Boston horse for another round.

I signed up for the Vermont Cities Marathon at the end of May.  I’m going to take this training and go up there and get my qualification on a reasonable course that doesn’t feel the need to demonstrate its dominance and extract its pound of flesh. 

And, I’ll see you out there.

Direct download: Boston2019.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:21pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-407 – Enoch Builds a Life of Running

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4407.mp3]
Link epi4407.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to episode 4-407 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

The first paragraph comes to you from Chicago where I am sipping coffee at in an airBNB getting ready to go work a convention all week.  It’s not perfect, having to stand around on my feet and act like an adult all week, but at least it gives me something to do to take my mind off where I’ll be in 7 days – and that would be driving to Hopkinton Massachusetts to join 30,000 other friends to run the 2019 Boston Marathon. 

Bear with me. There will be some time jumps in the narrative this episode as I work through the week in the snippets of time available to me.  I’ll try to give the updates as they pass through my big, dense brain.  It may cause us to time shift a bit as we progress but should eventually coalesce into some sort of thematic narrative. 

As for today, I feel good.  I’m very happy with my fitness.  The only thing left to do is execute a good, conservative race plan.  Which sounds easy enough, but has always been a challenge for me, especially at Boston.  I’m known as that guy who trains well and then has a bad race.  When you see that pattern consistently in an athlete it’s usually mental. 

Today we chat with Enoch who is also running Boston and we have a good conversations around coaching, training and running that I think you’ll get some value out of. 

I don’t know what section one is going to be, but you can bet it will be some sort of rumination on the upcoming race or the just-ended training cycle. 

I capped off my training since the last time we talked with a 23ish mile long run.  My buddies joined me for the first 2 hours and we ran a fair bit of it at a tempo pace.  When I dropped them I slowed it down.  I didn’t want to practice going out too fast and crashing.  I don’t need any more practice on that front!

I finished up the distance fine.  I was pretty tired for a few days as I recovered from it.  I managed to tweak something in my left foot on that run but nothing that will keep me from racing. 

I finished off the first week of taper, cutting way back on the volume.  My last tune up was 10 miles with the middle 7 at faster than race pace – no problem.  I’m fit and I have good pop. 

I went into this week of travel under 170 pounds, which is 15-20 pounds lighter than I usually race at.  I stopped thinking about dieting this week at the conference and have probably put 5 pounds back but I’ll eat clean this weekend to cap it all off,  I’ll line up light enough and I’ve stopped focusing on it. 

It looks like the weather is going to be good old Boston Marathon weather again this year.  Some sort of rain and wind.  I don’t really care.  I’ve got enough fitness to overcome most anything and I’ll take cold and rainy over hot any day. 

We’ll see how it plays out but it can’t be a s bad as last year.  Even if it is I’ll be ready both mentally and physically to adapt to it. 

I’ve run Boston 20 times.  This will be my 21st.  It still motivates me but it doesn’t hold the dread or make me crazy like it used to.  We are two old soldiers grappling our friendly match over a shared past that resonates with gratefulness for the opportunity. 

I am blessed.   

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Prelude – Boston 2019 - http://runrunlive.com/prelude-boston-2019

Voices of reason – the conversation

Coach Enoch

Thanks for having me on Chris, I really enjoyed it!

My Journey to the Olympic Trials: goo.gl/x8V527

www.TeamFloridaTrackClub.com

Istagram: Team_FTC

See you in Boston,

Over the past 15 years, Coach Enoch (pronounced e-knock) has worked with countless runners of all ages and abilities. He enjoys sharing his passion and knowledge of the sport with all of his runners. Enoch loves helping runners achieve their goals and dreams.

Coach Enoch first found his love for running in the 9th grade at Keystone Heights High School. As a member of the cross country and track team, Enoch took it upon himself to learn all that he could about running. He would go on to coach himself to multiple top five state championship finishes, and under his guidance, help his cross country team finish with its highest place in school history at the state meet. Upon graduation, Enoch was awarded a cross country/track scholarship to the University of Florida. During Enoch's freshman year at UF, he coached local High School Senior, Jeremy Criscione. Under Enoch's coaching Jeremy won the Cross Country state championship and set a State Record for the 5K and a 2-mile State Track championship. At UF, Enoch was a multiple All-SEC Conference and South Region Honoree. He was the captain of his Cross Country team and won numerous invitationals around the southeast.

Enoch still holds top 10 time records at UF in the 8k and Steeple Chase. During Enoch's time at UF, he worked closely with the coaches and gained much of his running knowledge from some of the top minds in the sport.

After College, Enoch stepped away from running to pursue other passions but he knew he would return back to his first love one day. In 2012, Enoch moved to Dallas and began coaching himself again. From 2012 to 2014, Enoch coached himself and qualified for 2016 Olympic Trials in the Marathon event. He trained 85 - 100miles a week and competed in both national and local track meets and road races. Enoch also took it upon himself to coach numerous local athletes in the area and helped elevate the local Dallas running scene to a new level. In 2014, Enoch and his wife Angela took a travel sabbatical living abroad for 15 months. They traveled 5 continents before returning home to Florida to settle down and be closer to friends and family in November 2015.

Upon moving home, Enoch began volunteering with the local non-profit, Youth Combine and competed on the Youth Combine's record breaking relay team at the Five Points of Life Marathon. In August 2016, Enoch began coaching with the Florida Track Club and fell in love with the team coaching aspect. Soon after, Enoch and the Florida Track Club formed a partnership, and thus, Team Florida Track Club was born! TeamFTC offers runners an exciting team atmosphere, organized group runs, customized training plans and one on one training sessions.

Enoch continues to race often and can be seen fighting for the win with other local elite athletes. Enoch debuted in the Marathon in 2017 running 2:18:17 to qualify for the 2020 Olympic Trials. Look for Coach Enoch and his Team Florida Track Club at your next local race or join today and become part of the team!

Enoch's Personal Records:

  • Distance Time
  • 1 Mile 4:08
  • 2 Mile 8:45
  • 5k 14:05
  • 8k XC 23:46
  • 10k (split in 1/2 Marathon) 30:02
  • 15k (split in 1/2 Marathon)  45:01
  • 10 Mile (split in 1/2 Marathon) 48:20
  • Half Marathon  1:03:54
  • Marathon 2:18:17

Athlinks race results

Section two – Now and the Body - http://runrunlive.com/now-and-the-body

Outro

Well, my friends you probably have trained hard and are ready to race after listening to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-407, now you just have to execute.  

Here we are on Saturday morning.  I’m pretty tired after a week of hard business travel.  Got up early to get to the airport Friday morning, quarter of 5 Chicago time.  My flight got into Boston around noon and I navigated the public transport, dragging my bags, over to the Hynes to get my bib. 

Walked the expo.  It was packed but smaller than previous years.  Lots of useless crap.  I wish they’d let more races in.  Who needs more crap?  I’m particularly disappointed with the official gear.  Seems like the Adidas folks are designing for a different audience – not me.  I don’t need shorts with an abstract picture and the unicorn on the ass.  Who wants to look at my ass?  Get off my lawn!

I bought a Boston Strong hat at the Marathon Sports booth. 

Took me forever to get home.  By the time I got out of the expo it was rush hour do I couldn’t get on any of the inbound Green Line trains at the Pru.  I had to drag my bags down to Park street, about a mile walk and then jump on the Red Line.  Lots and lots of time on my feet and walking this week.  I need get the heck off them!

I am avoiding getting on the scale!  Too late now anyhow!

Checked the weather this morning.  Understanding that it changes every day and there is no guarantee that the weather predicted today will have any resemblance to the weather on race day.  Earlier in the week they were saying it was going to be like last year.  The BAA sent out an email saying they would smoosh wave 4 into the back of wave 3 to get folks out of Hopkinton sooner. 

But as of this morning it looks, actually, like great racing weather.  Yes, it will be raining and windy.  But the key difference from last year is that it will be 20 degrees warmer and there will be a stiff tail wind for most of it. 

So, my friends it looks like we will be buffeted, but we will set the sails, rig the flying jib and point our small but rugged craft downwind. 

And I’ll see you out there.

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4407.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 12:18pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-406 – Dave McGilvary - How to Run Across the Country

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4406.mp3]
Link epi4405.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my endurance compatriots, companions and comrades and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-405. 

Had a bit of a scare or a potential set back in my training after the last episode.  You could hear it in my voice that I was had a little something going on and sure enough I woke up that Sunday sick as heck!

I was really looking forward to my long run that day.  It was just a plane Jane 3-hour and 15 minute surge run that would get me 21-22 miles.  Nothing complicated.  And I woke up with a fever headache.  After a few seconds of indecision, (you know me), I said ‘you’ll hate yourself if you don’t go try’. 

I met my buddy Tim who was only doing 2 hours and we got out.  I could tell I was hurting so I called it at 2 hours.  Got a solid 13miles in.  Went home.  Took a shower and laid in bed the rest of the day. 

I was concerned because I had a busy week with a 2-day road trip.  I figured I’d be out on the road, sick in airplane - you get the visual. 

It turned out better than I thought.  Coach had me scheduled for a recovery week anyhow.  There weren’t any monster workouts to add to being sick and traveling.  I was able to drug myself up and made the travel and meetings look easy.  And, most importantly it didn’t turn into something awful. 

You always run into some blips in your training cycle.  My training cycle has been going so well that I was due.  A couple more big weeks would be good for my confidence, but for the most part ‘the hay is in the barn’.  

Today I called up our old friend Dave McGilvary, head of DMSE sports and race director for the Boston Marathon.  I had a simple question to pick his brain about.  “What does it take to run across the country?”  We also chat a little about that other race…

Section one – the hay is in the barn… What to do when you have late-cycle training issues.

Section two – continuing homilies on being

Speaking of the Boston Marathon, they released the bib number assignments.  If you want to track me I’m 18,543. 

Think about that.  As hard as I train, with my finishing time around a 3:30 I’m nowhere near the mid-pack of this race.  There’s 30,000 runners in the race but only around 25,000 are qualified.  That means close to ¾ of the pack is in front of me.  You’d have to run my old Boston PR of 3:06 just to make it into the first wave. 

When they changed the standards by 10 minutes people wondered if the runners could keep up.  There’s your answer.  They certainly can.  The entire curve just shifted by 10 minutes and the race is still over-subscribed.  Amazing. 

This will be my 21st running of the race and I pulled out all the stops for this one.  I think I’m going to have a good race.  Regardless of what happens it is and has been an honor to be part of this thing, this slice of local history.  On April 15th this year, Patriot’s Day in Boston, my buddies and I have done the work and earned the right to play – and play we will!

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – The Hay is in the Barn! - http://runrunlive.com/late-training-cycle-drama

Voices of reason – the conversation

Dave McGillivray, Founder DMSE

RACE DIRECTOR, PHILANTHROPIST,  MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER,  ACCOMPLISHED ATHLETE. DAVE MCGILLIVRAY IS A PROFESSIONAL WITH A PURPOSE.

From his extraordinary 1978 run across the U.S. to benefit the Jimmy Fund and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute to serving as technical director then race director of the BAA Boston Marathon since the 1980s, McGillivray has helped organize more than 900 mass participatory events since founding DMSE Sports in 1981, while raising millions for worthy causes close to his heart.

Here are a few of his many career highlights:

In 1978 and over the course of 80 consecutive days, McGillivray ran across the U.S. from Medford, Oregon, to his hometown of Medford, Massachusetts, covering a total distance of 3,452 miles. He finished to a standing ovation of 32,000 fans in Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox. His effort raised thousands of dollars for the Jimmy Fund, a charity that supports research toward eliminating cancer in children.

The 1980 East Coast Run to benefit the Jimmy Fund consisted of 1,520 miles from Winter Haven, Florida, to Boston, Massachusetts. McGillivray was joined by Bob Hall, one of the pioneers of wheelchair marathoning, and raised thousands of dollars for the Jimmy Fund. He also met with then-President Jimmy Carter at the White House during the trek through Washington, D.C.

In 1980, McGillivray competed in the Hawaii Ironman Triathlon, the premier individual endurance event in the world. He finished 14th overall and was only the 30th person to have ever competed in an Ironman. The Ironman consists of three back-to-back distance events: a 2.4 mile rough, open ocean water swim, followed by a 112-mile bike race, and finally finishing up with a 26.2-mile marathon run. He completed the event again in 1983-1989 and 2014, for a total of nine times.

The Wrentham State School 24-Hour Run was designated as the "Run for Our Dreams Marathon." In 1980, this run traversed 120 miles in 24 hours throughout 31 cities within southeastern Massachusetts, ending in Foxboro Stadium during half-time of a New England Patriots football game. Held to benefit the Wrentham State School for the Mentally Retarded, this particular run raised more than $10,000 for the handicapped.

1981 brought an invitation to participate in the Empire State Building Run-Up. The course consists of 86 stories, 1,575 steps, 1050 feet in elevation, 40" stair height. Finished 10th place overall in a time of 13 minutes, 27 seconds.

His 1981 New England Run was a triathlon (running, cycling, and swimming) of 1,522 miles throughout the six New England states. He raised $55,000 for the Jimmy Fund. Unusual segments included running up and down Mount Washington and swimming two miles across Lake Winneapesaukee, both in New Hampshire. In addition, highlights included swimming one mile from Woods Hole toward Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts and running three miles with inmates inside Walpole State Prison.

Officially completed his New England Run by swimming more than seven miles from Martha’s Vineyard to Falmouth, Massachusetts, again raising more money for the Jimmy Fund. McGillivray was greeted by thousands on shore including some of the world’s greatest runners, including Alberto Salazar.

In 1982, McGillivray ran the Boston Marathon in 3:14 while blindfolded and escorted by two guides to raise more than $10,000 for the Carroll Center for the Blind in Newton, Massachusetts..

He traded his running shoes for swimming shorts in 1983 for the Jimmy Fund 24-Hour Swim. He swam for 24 consecutive hours in the Olympic-size Medford High School pool, swimming a total of 1,884 lengths and covering 26.2 miles (distance of Boston Marathon), again raising funds for the Jimmy Fund.

Over the course of 14 days in 1983, he bicycled more than 1,000 miles throughout six New England states to raise money for a scholarship fund for McGillivray's alma mater, Merrimack College.

In 1986, he formed the first sanctioned running club inside a maximum security institution at Walpole State Prison. He also conducted and ran in numerous distance races inside the prison yard, including completing and winning a full 26.2 mile marathon against inmates.

Also in 1986, he biked for 24 consecutive hours around a five-mile loop course in Medford while simultaneously directing the annual Bay State Triathlon, which was being held on the same course at the same time. He covered a total of 385 miles, again raising money for the Jimmy Fund.

Since 1988, he has been the Technical and Race Director of the Boston Marathon. He manages and oversees all technical and operational aspects of the oldest and most prestigious marathon in the world.

McGillivray’s many endurance events for charity are legendary, including running 120 miles in 24 hours thru 31 Massachusetts cities; an 86-story, 1,575-step run up Empire State Building in 13 minutes and 27 seconds; and running, cycling and swimming 1,522 miles thru six New England states while raising $55,000 for the Jimmy Fund.

In 2000, he was chosen as Race Director of the Year by Road Race Management/Running Times Magazine.

That same year, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award by Competitor Magazine for more than 30 years of service to the sport of road racing and triathlons.

In 2003, McGillivray created the DMSE Children’s Fitness Foundation to support non-profit organizations that use running to promote physical fitness in children and help solve the epidemic of childhood obesity.

In 2004, McGillivray and a team of veteran marathon runners journeyed across the country following the same path he took in 1978. Trek USA raised more than $300,000 for five charities benefiting children.

The race director of the Boston Marathon as well as an accomplished runner, McGillivray has run the marathon each year since 1973. For 16 years he ran it with all the other runners and since he began working with the race in 1988 he has run the course afterwards.

His 2006 book, The Last Pick, which he co-wrote with Linda Glass Fechter, chronicles his childhood and career as the last pick for team sports because of his small stature, motivating readers to never underestimate their own ability to set and achieve goals. Order here on Amazon.

In 2009 he was awarded the prestigious “Jimmy Award” from the Jimmy Fund of Boston for his 30-year association and his work with helping to raise money to fund cancer research at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

A skilled motivational speaker, McGillivray has displayed his signature ability to engage and inspire listeners to more than 1,600 audiences from corporate executives to high school students.

McGillivray has received numerous awards –  valedictorian at both his high school and college, 2005 Running USA Hall of Champions, 2007 Runner’s World Heroes of Running Award, the 2010 Fleet Feet Lifetime Commitment to Running Award, 2010 Ron Burton Community Service Award, the 2011 Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center's 2011 100 list, inducted into the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame in 2011 and also received the prestigious "Jimmy Award" by the Jimmy Fund and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for 30 years of contributing time and expertise to help raise millions for cancer research and treatment. In 2015, he received the MarathonFoto/Road Race Management Lifetime Achievement Award, and was named One of the 50 Most Influential People in Running by Runner's World - tied for 6th place.

In 2017 he was inducted into the Road Runners Club of America Long Distance Running Hall of Fame, joined by Ryan Hall, Desiree Linden, and George Hirsch.

In 2018, he completed the World Marathon Challenge: seven marathons on seven continents in seven days.

McGillivray has logged more than 150,000 miles, most for charity, raising millions for worthy causes.  He’s completed 155 marathons, which include 46 consecutive Boston Marathons (with 31 run at night after his race director duties are fulfilled).

In 2018 he published his first children's book, Dream Big: A True Story of Courage and Determination, co-authored with Nancy Feehrer. The illustrated book is based on his 2006 autobiography, The Last Pick. Dream Big may be ordered here on Amazon.

His personal bests? Marathon: 2:29:58 and for the Ironman: 10:36:42.

Each year he runs his birthday age in miles, starting when he was 12, and has not missed one yet. He was born on August 22, 1954 – you can do the math.

McGillivray, DMSE Sports and his DMSE Children’s Foundation have raised more than $50 million for various charities, including: The Jimmy Fund, Carroll Center for the Blind, Cystic Fibrosis, Lazarus House, Massachusetts Dietetic Association, Massachusetts Special Olympics, Moth- ers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD), Muscular Dystrophy Association, Sports Museum of New England, Wrentham State School.

 

Section two – Future, Past and Now - http://runrunlive.com/homily-2-on-being

Outro

Well, my friends you probably have not run 3000+ miles across the country to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-406, but maybe you will some day.  

One thing I would encourage you to do is to look at Dave’s resume.  He has accomplished so much in his life.  But, that’s not what’s special about Dave. What’s special is that most of his accomplishments are focused on helping others, he lives his life in service to the greater good.  And even with all he’s done he’s extremely approachable and humble. A good role model for us.   

I’ve had a great couple weeks since we last spoke.  I did get that quick fever/flu/cold whatever it was but I got through it in a week.  I had a bit of a anxiety spot when I bailed on that long run. 

As you may remember I did most of my long runs on the treadmill in February and early March.  I was hitting my paces but in the back of my mind I was always cognizant of the fact that the treadmill is not the road.  Until I road tested some of those paces I was going to be tentative. 

Last week was a rest week but coach gave me a nice long tempo run for Saturday.  And of course, the weather didn’t cooperate.  We had 20 MPH gusting, swirling winds and I was almost ready to drive into work and knock it out on the treadmill again, especially coming off that cold. 

But, I stuck my head outside and it wasn’t too bad so I suited up and hit the workout.  The workout was to warm up for 20 minutes then run 50 minutes at faster than race pace. The out and back I run these on starts out as a rolling downhill.  This means that when you make the turn-around, the second half of the run is a rolling uphill.  Which, in theory is a great workout, but in practice sucks as you climb those hills at the end of the tempo session. 

It turned out that the wind was a tail wind on the way out and a head wind on the way back.  I don’t really look at real-time splits as I’m doing these workouts.  I try to run them by feel.  When I hit that tempo I try to ease into what I think feels like, in this case a 7:50 mile.  I get feedback on my pace every mile. 

I was a bit horrified when the first mile split was a 7:30.  Too fast.  I tried to ease off a bit and the second split came in at 7:30 again.  Going into the turn around I really tried to ease up and managed a 7:45.

The challenge here is now I was turning back into the wind and up the hill.  In previous training cycles this is where my legs would have gone on me.  But I was able to hold the pace at a 7:39 a 7:49 and a 7:58 up the hill into a stiff headwind without my legs failing at all.  And when I made the turn to be running with the wind for the last half mile I averaged a 7:25.

A number of positives.  I was able to go out too fast and recover without failing.  I was able to do the hard work up hill and into the wind and my legs felt great.  I was able to close it hard.  All good signs. 

And I followed up this week on Tuesday with a similar step up run, on the same route without the wind, with 30 minutes at 7:50’s and closing with 30 minutes at 7:30’s. 

Last night I knocked out a set of 200-meter hill repeats at sub-7 pace and it felt easy. 

How is this possible?  Am I just lucky or gifted to be able to pull this kind of speed out of my butt at the ripe old age of 56 going on 57? 

No, I mean, yeah of course there is some underlying DNA involved, but this is the result of 20 years of consistent effort over the long run and 6 months of focused effort on this cycle.

What have I done differently this cycle to get such great results?  Near as I can figure it comes down to the following:

  • Consistency – I do the work with consistent focus and effort over time. This isn’t different from previous cycles, but it’s the baseline. 
  • Nutrition – I have dropped close to 20 pounds over the last 6 months. I usually shed 10 pounds in a marathon cycle. The last few cycles I haven’t really focused on going the extra 10 pounds.  The combination of less weight and cleaner eating early in the cycle allowed me to have higher quality training and faster paces.
  • Stretching and core – Another difference in this cycle is an early focus on daily flexibility stretches. This allowed me to train harder and probably kept the injuries at bay. 
  • Finally – good sleep – I haven’t been traveling as much and my commute isn’t bad. I’ve been getting that full 8-9 hours of sleep every night and I’m sure that contributes to my ability to execute.

Turns out the secrets to success are no secrets.  You just have to do it! Which is the hardest thing, right? It’s easy to say these things, it’s another to actually do them. But, if you do, I guarantee you’ll see the results.

Next time we talk will be the weekend before the Boston Marathon.  I’ve got one more long run and I’m into my taper.  Remember, my number is 18543, If you want to steal it you need to be able to run a sub-3:30 marathon. 

Your etymology for the week is the word “compass”.  This is a combination of two Latin words.  ‘Com’ meaning with and ‘passus’, which means pace or steps. 

So following your compass means bringing together your paces.

And I’ll see you out there.

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4406.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 3:57pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-405 – Julia and the Path Taken

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4405.mp3]
Link epi4405.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-405. 

Today we are going to talk to Julia.  Here’s the funny story.  About a year ago my friend introduced me to Julia and I interviewed her here in episode 4-368.  Then recently he introduced us again and I interviewed her again for this show. 

But here’s the thing.  None of us remembered the fact that we had already done it less than a year ago! It’s ok – she’s got a great story.  This stands alone.   And what I want you to take away from this is how she chose a special path for her life.  It involved a lot of marathons and twists and turns but it also involves a lot of love and fulfillment. 

We all make choices and those choices determine our paths.  Don’t assume you can’t choose a different path.  Don’t be afraid to try. 

So we’ve got the interview with Julia.  Also, in this episode I’m going to talk about one of my favorite topics, speed work.   Then I’m going to preach a bit about a new work I’m digesting by Eckhart Tolle.

My training is going great.  I’m super lean.  I’m strong.  I have no injuries. 

I’ve got a couple more big weeks left before I taper in to Boston. 

I knocked out a 20 miler with 18 of those at race pace on the treadmill last weekend.  I’ve been hitting all my workouts well.  I’ve got a 20+ outing tomorrow. 

The thing that really has me optimistic is that I feel a good ‘pop’ in my legs.  That feeling of strength and energy that I haven’t felt in a long time.  That last few cycles for Boston I’ve just been grinding through, hoping for a marathon miracle when I get to the race.  But this cycle feels different.  I’ve got pop. 

...

And Spring is here in New England!

I had my shorts on yesterday.  You can feel the Earth awakening.  You can hear the birds and smell the fecundity in the ground. 

And as the snow melts, let me share with you my favorite old-English word of the week.  Because it has to do with snow.  At some point I’ll tell the whole story of why English is such a greatly diverse language, but for now, the original Old-English brought over by the Anglo Saxons was a Germanic variety. 

In the old Germanic languages, they had ‘strong’ verbs.  About 300 of those strong verbs came into English and about 70 of them survived into modern English.  A strong verb is when the vowel sound changes to indicate the tense of the verb.  For example, a surviving strong verb is Sing, Sang, Sung.   So instead of adding an -ed or -s ending like ‘walked’ or ‘walks’ we change the vowel sound to indicate tense. 

With me so far?  Here’s the punchline.  The verb ‘to snow’ was originally a strong verb.  So my favorite Old-English word of the week is the strong verb past tense of snow.  Snew.  Isn’t that great?  Instead of ‘it snowed’ you can say ‘it snew’. 

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – My current nutrition - http://runrunlive.com/my-current-diet-and-meal-planning

Voices of reason – the conversation

Colin – Run Romsdal

Run Romsdal is a guided trail and mountain running company set up by Colin Thornton & Hélène Hubert. Through our love of running in wild, remote and spectacular places we discovered the Romsdal region in Norway and decided we could not think of a better place to bring like minded people to come and enjoy the outstanding beauty of the place in the safe hands of people who know it the best.

www.runromsdal.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/runromsdal/

Twitter - https://twitter.com/romsdalrun

Facebook - runromsdal

I have attached a few photos as I can never decide what to use! 

Section two – Feel the Fear (and do it anyway) - http://runrunlive.com/a-short-review-of-a-short-book-on-fear

Outro

Well, my friends you have chosen a path through this world even though it may have rained and snew along the way, you’re still going to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-405. 

Things are getting busy for me now for a few weeks.  I have some travel and some more big weeks in the lead up to Boston.  But I’m already looking beyond Boston.  I’ve signed up to pace Eric at Leadville late in the summer so it looks like another trail-running ultra summer for me.  I’m ok with that.  Very peaceful. 

I’ll probably look to work in a 100K race somewhere because it’s a distance I haven’t run.  Or maybe a 24 hour race or some other event that gets gives me a point on the horizon to point my coracle towards and steadies my hand on the tiller.

I’ve found a few new podcasts that I can recommend to you.  By the way, have you seen all the venture capital that is being poured into podcast content?  Hundreds of millions of dollars.  Maybe my ship is coming in after a dozen years of doing this? 

The first podcast is called “The Dropout” by ABC News.  It’s an investigative journalism piece about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos.  This was big news for awhile.  She was a 19 year old Stanford dropout that had a billion-dollar startup, but turns out there wasn’t an actual product that worked and the whole thing was a bit of Ponzi scheme. It’s a great window on, and indictment of, the whole Silicon Valley zeitgeist and how it can go horribly wrong.  It’s only 6 episodes and you can power right through the narrative in a week. 

The second is and NPR podcast called “Throughline” that explores historical events that you may not have known about.  Like how Sam Adams was the original conspiracy theorist, the almost impeachment of Andrew Johnson after the civil war and how we engineered the overthrow of the Iranian government in 1955.  Good stuff.  Fun, but also food for thought. 

Finally, another NPR show called “Invisibilia” that “explores the unseen forces that shape how we act and who we are”.   Very interesting.  I listened to a show last night titled “how to be Batman” about how the way we treat blind people prevents them from ‘seeing’. 

They talk to a man who uses echolocation to see.  He can ride a bike and hike in the mountains.  He believes that it is because no one ever told him he couldn’t.  When they tested his brain to see what was going on, sure enough the same place that sighted people use lights up the same way when he echolocates.  

The images he sees are the same images I see. The input mechanism is just a little different.

The links for all of these are in the post and in the show notes.

What are your beliefs keeping you from seeing?  Maybe your thinker is too busy thinking for you to be able to see?  Maybe there is another path?

When you find it…

And I’ll see you out there.

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4405.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:07pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-404 – Fjords and Mountains – Run Romsdal

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4404.mp3]
Link epi4404.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-404. 

This is the point where I frantically try to remember all those great stories, amusing anecdotes and funny things that I had ready to go when I was running but now retreat into the fog of my memory like scared children confronted by the full, blank whiteness of the empty page and blinking cursor.

Bam! Right out of the gate a 54-word sentence!  Yeah! Homeric in its epicness.  I am a prose god!

(Editor’s note: Word wants to change ‘epicness’ to epicenes, which is an entirely different thing. That is a Greek word meaning containing both sexes – so androgynous or hermaphroditic and if I wanted to use either of those words I would!  So, get out of my hair Bill Gates!) 

Now I am picturing the poor, confused new listener who though they were tuning into a running podcast and instead are getting a crazed etymology tantrum.  Welcome to the inside of the RunRunLive hive mind my friends – sometimes it’s a bit fractal in here.

But yes, we do talk about endurance sports.  I have been easing myself back into Twitter after a couple years off and there is a group called #RunChat that is nice. 

That’s where I found today’s guest. 

I like cool places to run and explore and these folks have gone off to the edge of the map in Scandinavia to set up a running adventure company in the Fjords and mountains. 

The photos are spectacular.  Real Viking land stuff.

Which causes me to remember one of those amusing anecdotes.  Have you ever heard of Ragnar Lodbrok?  The infamous Viking chieftain who plundered around Frankia and Anglo-Saxon Britain in the late 700’s?  Lodbrok is a compound of two Germanic words.  And literally translated means “Hairy Breaches” or “Hairy Pants”. 

You can kind of see some English words in there think ‘Locks” as in ‘flowing locks of hair’ and ‘Breach’ – so Lod-Brok.  Because Old English and Old Norse both came from a common Indo-European root language. 

In section one I’ll talk about what my nutrition and diet looks like this cycle that is getting me lean and in section two I’ll talk about a little book I read about fear. 

And yes, as we speak I’m about 6 weeks away from the Boston marathon, which in runner-speak means 4 weeks of big miles and 2 weeks of taper. 

My training is going really well.  I’m still quite lean and have been sticking to my diet plan for the most part.  I am battling the weather though.  Every time I have a hard workout it seems like it’s snowing or raining or in a deep freeze. 

I’ve been spending a ton of time on the treadmill.  Which is good and bad.  It’s good because I can cleanly set the paces I want and hold them.  It’s bad because the treadmill does not translate 100% to road training. 

For instance, I knocked off 18 miles on the treadmill last Sunday with the middle 14 at target race pace minus 7.  If I did that outside in the freezing rain storm we were having my pace would be all over the place and I’m not sure I’d get the benefits of the workout.  I need the confidence of knowing I can hold those paces. 

Now over the next 4 weeks we’ll throw in some 20 milers and some race specific stuff.  But, all else being equal I feel great.  Light, fast, strong and healthy. 

….

One of my habit changes that has been successful in this nutrition cycle is how I’m making my suppers now.  In an ideal world I would eat anything late in the evening, but when I get home from work I’m starving. 

What I’ve been doing is using my cast-iron skillet to sauté up some vegetables when I come through the door.  This gives me something to do and takes maybe 20-30 minutes to prepare.  The resulting dinners are healthy and fill me up.  They are nutrition dense and calorie reasonable.

Take your big cast iron skillet.  Put it over medium heat.  Pour a glug of olive oil in.  Dice up a garlic clove or two.  Dice up a small onion.  Dice up a teaspoon-sized chunk of ginger.  Put all this into the pan and stir it around in the oil until the onions are clear.  2-3 minutes.

While that’s cooking cut up your veg.  It can be mushrooms, cabbage, squash, broccoli – whatever you have.  Fill up the skillet because the veg shrinks as it cooks.  Sauté that while mixing it so it doesn’t burn. Maybe another 5 minutes. 

Pour in a half a cup of stock to get the steaming going.  You can cover it and it will cook faster but will get soggy.  Alternately you have to keep mixing it so it cooks evenly. 

Serve over rice or anything else you have.  The key ingredient is the ginger.  The ginger makes it taste like restaurant food. 

That will fill you up and while you’re waiting for it to cook you can clean the kitchen up a bit and kill two birds with one stone.  Actually, PETA doesn’t want us to use those animal threatening phrases anymore.  They want us to modify our speech to be animal friendly.

So – instead I’ll say – you can feed two birds with one scone.

Birds like scones.

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – My current nutrition - http://runrunlive.com/my-current-diet-and-meal-planning

Voices of reason – the conversation

Colin – Run Romsdal

Run Romsdal is a guided trail and mountain running company set up by Colin Thornton & Hélène Hubert. Through our love of running in wild, remote and spectacular places we discovered the Romsdal region in Norway and decided we could not think of a better place to bring like minded people to come and enjoy the outstanding beauty of the place in the safe hands of people who know it the best.

www.runromsdal.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/runromsdal/

Twitter - https://twitter.com/romsdalrun

Facebook - runromsdal

I have attached a few photos as I can never decide what to use! 

Section two – Feel the Fear (and do it anyway) - http://runrunlive.com/a-short-review-of-a-short-book-on-fear

Outro

Well, my friends you have traversed the dangerous, naked spine of a rocky mountain to the Fjord at the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-404.  Careful you don’t twist an ankle.

Next time we are going to talk with Julia who has a great story and a passion for telling it. 

I hope you noticed I’m trying to re-energize the podcast.  Baby steps!  I am working on a lot of projects and life gets weird sometimes, but it’s all good.  I’m thankful for your company and the opportunity for us to connect.

So – Thank you.

My training is hard, but boringly predictable.  I’m getting in 50ish miles on 5 days of hard work on my big weeks.  I’m typically doing 3 hard workouts a week.  I have been doing more speed work this cycle which I really feel like I needed.  I have knocked off 10 Yasso 800’s at my target race time which supposedly is a positive predictor!

I had a great workout on Tuesday this week.  On the treadmill again (because the weather was awful) It was a 1 hour step up run, which is actually an ‘easy’ tempo session for me because this is a step back week.  On a build week that would be a 1:30 step up run or even more.

For an hour step up you warm up for 20 minutes.  Run at tempo pace for 30 minutes then cool down for 10.  At first I was struggling a little, breathing hard, battling the workout.  But at 20 minutes into the tempo (40 minutes into the workout) it was like a switch flipped and I felt great. 

I dropped the pace to 30 seconds per mile faster than my goal marathon pace and held that for the last 10 minutes of the step. 

I somehow got into flow state and was just flying and feeling great.  It was effortless.  It was great.  That’s why we do it right?  Every once in a while, it feels effortless and that’s a beautiful thing.

I’m going to leave you with more word play from my current fascination with the history of English.  My favorite Old English word so far is ‘Gongawiver’ which translates to “Going Weaver”, Gongawiver.  That’s the old English word for spider.  Isn’t’ that great?

You can use it in a sentence… Like, “The epicene server at Starbucks was frightened by a scary gongawiver.

And I’ll see you out there.

 

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4404.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-403 – Marnie’s Art Adventures

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4403.mp3]
Link epi4403.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-403. 

How is everyone doing?  Reinvigorated for this new year?  No?  Feeling the cold winter doldrums? 

Well snap out of it!  Put on your big pants! Suck it up Buttercup! 

There are roads to be run, there are adventures to be had, there are people to see, people like Marnie, who we talk to today, who did what we all want to do – she took two of her passions – running and art and mixed them together with community to form a little tribe, a little business. 

And that was a 56-word long sentence! Vladmir Nabokov would be proud.  Who needs grammar?  It just slows the creative flow.  The first written languages had no grammar.  They were just strings of words. That’s why you need priests to read them and interpret them.  I suppose not unlike our current internet…

Anyhow – back to our story.  And what a story it is!

I am neck deep and two months out from my 21st Boston Marathon.  My training is going as well as can be expected.  I’m getting all the workouts in.  I’m light and strong.  Weighed in at 172.8 pounds this morning with 9.9% body fat. 

Those are random numbers without some context.   What’s the baseline here?  When I raced my PR’s Decades ago the lightest I ever got was the low 180’s.  But as you get old you lose muscle mass.  Just looking at my body composition now at 173 versus then at 185 – they are close to equivalent.  Meaning I’ve lost about 10 pounds of body mass over 20 years.  Some is muscle mass, some is fat storage, some is the shrinking of my brain. 

Because we all know that people start losing their minds as they get older, right?  Kurt Vonnegut referred to the 6 pounds of brain in the human skull dismissively as nothing more than “A dog’s Breakfast”. 

As for body fat %, a healthy male is not going to get much leaner than 3-6%.  5% is often quoted as the apex of physical, lean, fitness, - the gold standard - for men.  6-10% is considered ‘athletic’ for men.  Women are designed differently and normally (key word there ladies) ‘normally’ are 7-9% higher in fat percentage across the board on all these numbers.

In section one I will talk about listening to your bodies.  And in section two I’ll talk about a book I read called “The Subtle Art of not Giving a F*CK” 

What I love about Marnie’s story is that she took a personal adventure, running around her neighborhood, and turned it into a ‘thing’.  You don’t have to get on an aeroplane or cross an ocean to have a fulfilling adventure.  Adventures are all around you.  You just have to reach out and grab them. 

You might even say; the adventure is inside you. 

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Listening to your body - http://runrunlive.com/listening-to-your-body

Voices of reason – the conversation

Marnie

Thank you so much for the interview! I am excited about this. To answer your questions:

 

  1. A short bio for the notes:

Marnie Kunz is a running coach, writer, and entrepreneur. She is the founder of Runstreet Art Runs, which fuse running and street art to bring people together to learn about art in their communities while getting in a fun workout.

 

  1. a good picture for the episode art - Please see attached. Photo by Filles Garcons Photography.
  2. Any links you want to include. Sure!

 

Runstreet Art Runs https://www.runstreet.com/events/

Runstreet Instagram https://www.instagram.com/runstreet/

Runstreet Twitter  https://www.twitter.com/runstreet

Runstreet Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Runstreet1/

Marnie's writing on Runstreet and on Medium

 

Let me know if you need anything else. Thank you!!

 

Cheers,

 

Marnie

Section two – Life sucks, then you die… - http://runrunlive.com/life-scks-then-you-die

Outro

Well, my friends you have taken a small adventure to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-403.  It’s a rough stretch for me.  I’ve got Valentines Day, my wife’s birthday and our wedding anniversary all in the same 3 week period. 

It is a dark time where the alpha male must stick to the shadows and hunt carefully. A time fraught with peril. 

Like I said we are 2 months out from Boston.  I’ve been doing some daily blogging of my workouts and other tidbits on my website runrunlive.com if anyone is interested.  The challenge I have is that I’m usually writing those posts at night, after my workout, when I’m half asleep and brain dead. 

I do a lot of monosyllabic grunting – and that doesn’t translate into prose well. 

I’ve been challenged to keep up with the podcast for a few reasons.  Primarily I don’t have a good place to record.  I used to work from home on Fridays and that was  good, but my wife has decided to take Fridays off – so she’s podcast-blocking all of you. 

I’m actually in a conference room right now in the building I work at.  The space that the company has is designed into an old manufacturing space.  I don’t have a real office with a door and the acoustics are terrible.  So, we’ll test this out and see how it works.  I may have to build a studio somewhere. 

Another podcast prohibitor is that coach has been scheduling big workouts for me on Fridays.  I came in early this morning to hit the treadmill. He gave me a 7 by 7 minutes at 5K pace. Which is not an easy workout.  With the warm up and cool down and shower you are at over an hour and a half, close to two hours. 

Having these long, hard workouts hanging over my head on a Friday screws up my schedule and my head. 

I had a video shoot in the office today so I had to get cleaned up.  Of course, no matter how much time you spend wandering around the house preparing stuff for work and the gym you always forget something. 

This morning was a belt, which was a problem because I’m so lean my pants are falling off me.  I had to have my wife run a belt over.  Good thing it was her day off! 

With Sunday’s 2:30 long run this will give me another 50ish mile week.  So far, so good. 

You may have thought the message of the don’t give a F book was a bit depressing.  But the power of that message is a reset to reality and critical thinking.  When you are forced to confront the fact that life is suffering, you’re not all that special and none of it is going to matter in 100 years anyway it frees you. 

It frees you to not take yourself so damn seriously.  It frees you to choose what makes you happy. It frees you to execute with detachment and that enables you to get stuff done, important stuff, that will, at the end of the day make a difference and ease your own and other peoples’ suffering. 

So – detaching, helps you to find and to own your own journey. 

At least that’s what my dog’s breakfast is telling me. 

I’ll see you out there,

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4403.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 6:00pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-402 – A Narcissistic Interviewee

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4402.mp3]
Link epi4402.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-402. 

First of all let me apologize for causing so much mid-workout vision issues last week for many of you.  I got multiple letters that many of you had some dust in your eyes when I talked about the passing of my friend Buddy.  Or as my sister put it, “Thanks for making me ugly-cry in the gym!”

Twas no my intention.  I just wrote what came to me in that moment on that day when I knew we were going to have to make that last trip to the vet and my old friend would need to bring some change to pay the ferryman. 

Let’s not be all sack cloth and ashes here, rolling in the mud, tearing at our hair and wailing.  Let’s celebrate today, this moment and the friends we have to share it with.  If a dog teaches you anything it is how to live in and enjoy the moment. 

The sun came up today.  The reaper hasn’t caught us yet and we, you and I, are going to fight that asshole all the way down.  We are not going to sit around and wait to be caught. We are going to get out there and live and love and have adventures and make that sonnabitch work hard to catch us. 

Right?

Sorry for the shows being a bit less predictable in cadence recently.  Life happens.  Even to me!

Today we interview some narcissistic knucklehead about pretty much nothing.  In section one I’ll talk about committing, really committing to this marathon cycle.  And in section two I’ll give you the draft introduction to a new book I’m writing on startup sales. 

I’ll give you a couple useful tips for the season.  First, this time of year we end up having to hit the gym a lot.  One of the things I do during my warm up, because whether you’re running or lifting or whatever you should do a little 5 minute warm up, what I do is get on the treadmill in my socks for 5 minutes.  I set it at a slow pace, (for me), like 12-15 min miles and just let my feet relax and spread out a bit.  Really helps get everything warm and relaxed. 

Second tip is about consistency.  One of the things I’ve been challenged with over the last couple cycles, especially since the 100 miler, is my legs are super tight.  What I’ve done is to work a simple 5-6 minute stretching routine into every day regardless of what my workout is.  It’s not the stretching per se but the consistency of doing it every day that makes a difference. It has really helped my running this cycle.  Small things done consistently have a huge impact.

I’ve got a new podcast for you.  The History of The English Language.  If you love words and language like me, you will find this fascinating.  This is for all you closet Philologists and Lexicologists.  If you don’t like these things it’s going to be like a freshman English lecture. 

For example, I learned that there is a root language known as Indo-European that influenced Latin, Greek and Germanic.  Those languages borrowed from each other, but were all decedents of the Indo European. 

And, today I learned that the original Indo-European word for ‘host’ had a dual meaning of both the host and the guest.  Same word.  This root word gives us both ‘host’ and ‘guest’ as well as house, hospital, hospitality, etc.  It also means that the word Ghost is literally a guest in your house.

Ok.  Get your hankies out. One last Buddy story from last week.  I stayed home with him Thursday and even though we had a rough night he rallied during the day and was up tottering around the house.  At some point in the afternoon my wife came home so I took the opportunity to jump out the door for a run in the woods. 

As I’m standing in the open doorway in my running kit talking to me wife the old dog stumbles over and sticks his head between me and the door.  The dog can barely stand but he’s decided he’s ready to head out into the woods with me on a run. 

A gamer and a wonder dog to the very end.

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – A new training cycle- http://runrunlive.com/hitting-the-training-again

Voices of reason – the conversation

Chris Russell

Chris is the product of suburban entitlement and over-education.  I promise I’ll find real guests in the future.  😊

Section two – Startup Sales - http://runrunlive.com/startup-sales

Outro

Well, my friends you have looked at your reflection and fallen in love through to the end of the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-402.  Wake up.  We’ve got work to do.  And miles to go before we sleep. 

My training is going very well.  My strategy of losing weight and eating clean is paying off with some great workouts.  I feel lean and strong.  At least this week. 

I’ve been holding steady at around 173 pounds, which is somewhere around 10 pounds lighter than I normally would be at this point.  The first 10 are easy.  I want to see if I can get down to 165ish and go into Boston at 170ish.  My paces ae better and my staying power in my legs is better.  We’ll see how it goes. 

I don’t have any races planned for the spring besides Boston.  This is good and bad.  It’s good because I won’t waste energy and risk over-training by racing too hard.  It’s bad because I like to use those races as practice runs to give me confidence.  So much of racing well is confidence.

I’m in the midst of thinking thorough what I want to do with the podcast going forward.  I think this current format has run its course.  I like the format but I want to bring the quality up and be more consistent on the cadence and the themes.

Went out into the trails today.  It was Sunny and just below the freezing mark.  We had a deep freeze, followed by a heavy rain, followed by another freeze.  The trails are nice and firm but there is a lot of ice.  It’s slow going.  Buddy would not have liked it.  He didn’t like the ice. 

I ran into a guy ‘walking’ some sort of cattle dog cross that was wildly exuberant, running in circles and giving me friendly full-body hip checks.  Fun times.  Nice to see the people using those trails.  Buddy and I made those trails. 

It’s good for the soul.  Getting out in the woods.  Wending your way through the ice and snow.  Splitting the horizon where winter sun meets frozen ground.  That’s life.

I’ll see you out there,

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4402.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:42pm EDT

A life Well Lived

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/ buddy-Eulogy.output.mp3]
Link buddy-Eulogy.output.mp3

A life well lived.

I’m standing in the front yard in my pajamas.  It’s 18 degrees and everything is frozen hard with that late January freeze that penetrates deep into the earth.  I’m holding Buddy’s emaciated body up to see if maybe he wants to pee.  He’s warm as he leans against me. 

He hangs his head and collapses on weak legs.  I pick him up.  So light now.  Just a warm bag of bones.  Nothing left of that strong dog that would sprint laps in this yard or launch himself 10 feet in the air to grab a frisbee in this yard or steal the soccer ball off my foot in our yard.  His yard. 

I have a photograph that I gifted to my wife one year, many years ago.  It’s an aerial photograph of the yard some outfit was peddling in our neighborhood.  The photo is late summer.  There in the green of the grass sits Buddy, ever watchful, surveying the land from his perch on the hill.  Always at the ready.

I stayed home with him yesterday.  I slept in the chair next to his bed the night before.  It was a long night.  I was woken every hour or so by the grinding of his teeth and the spasming of his body from long, violent seizures.  I put my hands on him and tell him it’s ok as he rides them out. 

Oddly it was a comfort to me.  To be able to spend this time close with him.  I stayed home from work and built a fire in the fireplace.  I sat on the couch and read while he stumbled around or slept. 

It brought back memories of a parallel time when my oldest daughter Katie was born.  I was in transition between jobs and took a couple weeks off to stay home with the newborn.  I quickly discovered that all I could do was hold that warm infant on my chest and read.  And we spent that time together.  And I was grateful for it. 

After this long night I thought this was the day, but he perked up.  He was stumbling around the house.  He was eating some treats.  I figured I’d give him another night.  He earned it.  But today is that day. 

He was doing fine a month ago on his 16th birthday, but something happened.  Some sort of system failure.  He lost 15 pounds in less than a month.  The seizures.  This morning he could not stand.  It happens quickly.  He’s exhausted. 

It’s a difficult puzzle to unravel with a pet.  How much of this is me trying to avoid my own pain and how much of it for them?  How do you make that decision or more importantly, when do you make that decision?  We can’t fathom their thoughts and emotions. As close as they are to us, they are still an alien mind.  Most of the narrative our own egomaniacal anthropomorphizing.

It’s a weighty thing to have to decide the time of death for a friend. 

These last couple days he hasn’t been eating his food, but he has been more than willing to eat our food.  As sick and weak as he is, even when we have to hold him up, he’ll inhale that hamburger and chicken and chees with a pepperoni chaser.  Good for him.  Getting the last laugh.

Most people have many pets in their lives, but there is always that one.  The one that grew up with your kids.  That one that was your best friend.  Buddy was that pet for us. 

He was not without neuroses.  He was irrationally afraid of thunder and fireworks.  He was hard-wired to chase anything that moved, no matter what your opinion on the appropriateness of that chasing was.

But he was the best dog I have ever known.  He was my running partner.  He shared thousands of miles of road a trail at my side, stride for stride.  He was incredibly smart, incredibly athletic and the kindest, gentlest guileless soul to his pack. 

How many spiritual moments did we share in the trails?  Hundreds.  Thousands.  Uncountable.  Truly shared, because he an I had this resonance in the woods, this shared joy of the joyous bounty of nature beneath our feet and around us.  We celebrated together.  We were a pack of two, brothers, and single-minded on the hunt. 

As men and dogs have been for eons.  Filled and vibrating with the perfectness of the forest.  Permeated with that primeval joy. 

I’ll miss that.  But, I’ll also celebrate it.  Because how lucky am I to have intersected with this soul in this time and place?  How much fuller am I?  He gave me more than I can ever give.  He was an example of kindness and joy.  He was my friend and his passing will leave a big hole in all our lives. 

It was a life well lived. 

 

Direct download: buddy-Eulogy.output.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:48pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-400 – Matt makes it stick

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4401.mp3]
Link epi4401.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-401. 

Nice to be back in the saddle from the holidays.  I feel like I’ve had a good couple months.  I took an extra week on my cadence for this one because It was the holidays and, frankly, I had a lot going on.  Plus I was sick.  I got whatever cold is going around.  Not the flu.  Not pneumonia. Just a cough that hung around for the better part of 2 weeks. 

I managed to hold the line on my diet through the holidays.  I did not lose a bunch of weight, but I did eat relatively cleanly and avoided most of the sweets and adult beverages of the season.  This was my plan, so well done me.  This puts me in a healthy spot to hit my Boston training hard and lose 10-15 pounds. Because I think that’s what I’m going to need to do to have any shot of requalifying. 

People think ‘Hey, Boston is in the spring! You’ve got plenty of time!” But that’s not really true.  When you turn the corner to a new year on January 1st you are only 3 and ½ months away, which in broad strokes means 14 weeks.  A typical hard training cycle for me is 12 weeks with a 2 week taper, so it’s game on. 

I’m not starting from scratch and I’m healthy and I’m mentally enthusiastic.  The dark times will come, but as of now I’m in a good spot. 

Today we chat with Matt who is a team mate of mine.  He’s got a great story.  And it’s a timely story as we ease into the ‘resolution season’.  Listen to what it took for Matt to find the courage to switch the momentum and begin his transformation. 

In section 1 I’ll give you a wrap up on the Groton Marathon, which, against the odds we managed to pull off successfully last Sunday.  Thinking about it, if I include that in my week, I’m over 50 miles for week one of my training!  Feel pretty good for that.

In section 2 I’ll perambulate about goals and stuff, because, hey, it’s that time of year.

When I was out running the Groton Marathon with my buddies I told them I had two topics that I wanted to discuss.  The first was the ending of the movie Road House and the second was the Boston Marathon of Sex.   Now, this being a family friendly show I’ll reserve the latter explanation for my members feed. I’m writing that as we speak and I crack myself up.

But, I was watching, or more to the point being forced to watch the movie Road House with Patrick Swazey, may he rest in piece, and like so many of the movies from that era, the ending didn’t make any sense. 

So he rips the one bad guy’s throat out.  Then he goes after the big bad guy.  Kills 4 of his henchmen and then has the final fight with the big bad guy.  In the end he decides not to rip that guy’s throat out but the friendly villagers kill the bad guy with shotguns. 

Shortly after the police show up.  Now we have been told that the police are in the back pocket of the bad guy.  The police ask, ‘What happened?’ and everyone says “We didn’t see anything…”  And that’s it.  Cut to the final seen of Swazey skinny dipping with the love interest. 

So, let me get this straight… There’s 6 dead bodies, one of which has Patrick Swazey’s knife sticking out of his chest, and the police just shrug their shoulders and say, ‘Well, I guess since no one saw anything…it’s all good… nothin to see here…”?

I’ve seen enough episodes of Law and Order to know they’re not getting off that easy! It’s ok, I ripped his throat out in self-defense…

Plus, they shot this guy with old shotguns.  He probably wouldn’t be dead yet when the police come in.  If it was bird shot he’d just be uncomfortable.   Maybe he had a heart attack from the shock. 

But think about all the movies you’ve seen where the end is a big pile of dead guys and it’s ok. 

That will give you something to talk about on your next long run.

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – 2018 Groton Marathon- http://runrunlive.com/the-groton-marathon-2018

Voices of reason – the conversation

Matt Schorer

Matt is father, husband and triathlete from upstate NY who recently made the successful move to reclaim his health.  He trains with Jeff Kline at DailyFitBook.net

Matt is currently training for the Lake Placid IronMan in Late June of this year.  

https://www.facebook.com/fatguytotriguy/

https://www.facebook.com/matt.schorer.71/about

https://www.facebook.com/dailyfitbook/

Section two – Your Best Self - http://runrunlive.com/your-best-self

Outro

Well, my friends kicked off your new year with a thorough listening to of  the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-401.  Check that off your list.  

Next up for me is a whole lot of training.  I’m going deep.  I can’t control the weather but I can control whether or not I show up and whether or not I consistently do the work.   I’ve got a good jump start on this cycle.  I’ve been working on my core a stretching daily. 

I skipped the Hangover Classic this year. I was still fighting a cold and didn’t think jumping in the Atlantic Ocean was such a good idea. 

I did finally start working on the startup sales book.  I pushed the introduction out to LinkedIn.  If anyone is interested in being a proof reader or a friendly critical eye I welcome the help.  One of the things I’m trying to do better is to ask for help.  I tend to want to do everything myself and that has a built in ceiling to it.

I see the people in my community starting to complain about all the people showing up at the gym this week.  My experience is that they tend to peter out after 10 days or so. 

I’ve got a couple suggestions for this first of the year gym bottleneck. 

First, if it really bugs you go early or late.  I don’t care what time of year it is, you’ll have plenty of elbow room at 5:30 or 6:00 in the morning. 

Second, as we heard from Matt today, some of those out of breath people ARE going to stick it out.  Let’s try to lean in and encourage them.  Be that person that is the tipping point in that emerging healthy person’s life. 

Take this as an opportunity to spread the good news and set a good example.  This is a good way for you to practice abundance in the new year.

And, if you see Patrick Swazey, run because he’s been dead for a decade so the zombie apocalypse will be under way. 

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

Direct download: epi4401.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 6:05pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-400 – David Crosses the Jordan

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4400.mp3]
Link epi4400.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-400. 

Yeah, that’s right, 400th numbered episode.  That’s something.  I still get the occasional letter form someone who has found inspiration or comfort in what you and I, my friends, do here on the RunRunLive Podcast.  And by George, if we’re still helping people or adding value, we’ll keep going!

A couple notes about last week’s show.  I said Buddy was 14, which was technically correct, but he turned 15 this week.  The old dog.  He doesn’t like getting up in the morning now, especially when he has to troop outside in the freezing cold. 

The other thing I forgot to add was that I got so flustered by the karmic peeing - pooping incident at the pet store that I forgot to use the coupon that I went home to get originally that started the whole thing. Ce’st la vie.

I’m making some progress with my nutrition.  I’m going on over 30 days of pretty clean eating and starting to see some results.  My strategy was to start early and not wait until after the holiday.  This way even if I could only battle to a tie, I won’t be starting my spring training cycle in a hole.  If I look at data from previous years, I typically lose it big time in December and it costs me 5-10 pounds.

If I have any chance of re-qualifying this year with the new standards, I’m going to have to be 10 pounds lighter going into the race.

My legs and pacing continue to give me trouble.  Coach says it’s a hangover from the 100 miler.  I just can’t seem to find my easy zone 2 pace on the roads.  I’m working it.  Trying to be patient. 

On today’s show we have our friend David Foss who took an adventure to the Dead Sea to run a trail marathon.  In section one I’ll probably give you a brief recap of my Mill Cities race. In section 2 I’ll talk about a book I’ve been reading. 

I read a lot of books.  Reading is my go-to vehicle for absorbing content.  I have to be careful because I can be influenced by books as well.  I’ll read the latest book on XYZ and find myself all of a sudden trying to put XYZ into full blown practice.  My filter is not the best sometimes. 

This time of year is hard for a lot of people.  I don’t know why.  Maybe it’s the holidays force you to deal with family stuff.  Maybe it’s the cold and dark.  Maybe it’s something seasonal with our species. 

I was reading an emotional outpouring from a woman on the social media site where she was really struggling.  She had abusive relationships, she was injured and she couldn’t shake the feelings of desperation and depression.  The walls closing in.  I suppose that’s one positive thing about social media is that people can use it to reach out to the community for help. 

Sure enough there were a long trail of positive responses.  People trying to help.  It was a positive response to a cry for help.  111 responses as of last viewing. 

I happened to notice a post that our friend who is in a related profession shared.  So I copied it and reposted it. 

“Did you know that if you text "Home" to 741741 when you are feeling depressed, sad, or going through any kind of emotional crisis, a crisis worker will text you back immediately and continue to text with you? Many people, especially younger ones, prefer text to talking on the phone. It's a free service to anyone-- teens, adults, etc.-- who lives in the US. Depression is real, you are not alone.”

741741 I have not tried it, but I trust Greg – it’s in the show notes if you need it.

I also responded that “We are all basket cases. Some of us just hide it better. And to Keep running.”

Because on social media people only share their perfect worlds with their perfect relationships and perfect children and perfect race times!  Life’s not like FaceBook.  Life is rusty and lumpy. 

Don’t get caught comparing yourself to someone else’s best day ever. 

On with the show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Mill Cities Relay- http://runrunlive.com/mill-cities-relay-2018

Voices of reason – the conversation

David Foss

During the business day, David is a professional geologist and Massachusetts Licensed Site Professional, focusing on Brownfields redevelopment and the productive reuse of regulated hazardous waste sites. 

After hours, David is an endurance athlete making time to test his limits and expand his horizons.  In 2012 he joined some friends for a New Years’ 5K and came to the realization that something was missing from his life.  He was a busy environmental professional, husband, and father of two, but what was missing was the time to clear his head, think, and get back to nature.  Endurance sports (road cycling, kayaking, and running) helped round out David’s world view.  Since that first 5K race, he has found distance running to be a path to happiness and mindfulness.  He has run 4 road marathons (one DNF), 2 trail marathons, 4 trail 50K’s, a 50-Mile race, and a 12-hour race. 

 After running 57-miles in 12 hours in the rain and dark, David shared the following blog post:  Suffering is Optional

https://www.wilcoxandbarton.com/news-resources/Suffering-Is-Optional-entry-34

In 2015 David Followed the “Marathon BQ” training plan and grabbed that golden ring, running a 3:19 to qualify for Boston.  Running the Boston Marathon was an amazing, magical experience.  In contrast, this interview is a discussion of the Eilat Desert Marathon in the Negev Desert in southern Israel.  The Desert Marathon was an amazing experience - - and as different from Boston as can be imagined. 

David is a regular contributor to “The Extra Mile Podcast” and shares his thoughts on running and life in the Spreaker podcast:  “Running Virtually” by Just-Plain-Dave.

https://www.spreaker.com/user/8342740

Section two – Fear – You can handle it - http://runrunlive.com/you-can-handle-it

Outro

Well, my friends you have spurred your camel through the eye pf the needle that is the the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-400.  I’m sure it was a biblical, real old testament, experience.

Next up for me is the Groton Marathon.  It’s a made up race in the town I grew up in.  I’ve got a handful of people coming out to run with me.  Hopefully the weather won’t be so dreadful this year.  There’s construction at the place we start and finish so I’m going to have to figure out how to put in another couple hundred feet somewhere! Or just cut the course short.  I mean who really cares, right?

If you want to swing by Groton Massachusetts, we have all sorts of distances, not just the marathon.  I usually get 15 -20 knuckleheads from my running club to show. 

I think David Foss is going to come up. 

The dates work out well this year in that the marathon will be on the 30th so I get a day to recover for the Hangover Classic on the 1st. 

Then I jump into some serious training for Boston.  January and February are the big months.  I’m going to talk to coach and see if we can’t load it up and get some good miles in.  I’d like to be over-confident going in.  Because, as we all know by now, you never know what the weather is going to be. 

If you want to follow my training I use the Daily FitBook platform.  My Garmin data also updates Garmin Connect, Strava and Myfitness Pal – as far as I know. 

I love adventures.  I’ve been traveling most of my career and I always enjoy the spaciousness and freedom of business travel.  I haven’t been getting out as much as I like to in my last couple roles.  Which gives me less fodder for storytelling. 

Thanks to David for sharing his travel adventure with us.  I felt like I was there.  I could feel the dry heat and smell the dust.  The dust of centuries.  The dust of civilizations. The dust of history.

The first crusade went through where he was.  It was the only recorded time the Europeans used knights in full armor on heavy horse for a frontal charge.  It worked well the first time.  You can imagine how surprising it would have been to have these characters show up in your back yard.   A couple hundred of these guys in heavy armor charging down on you. 

As far as historians know it was only used that once in the beginning of the first crusade. Turns out riding a giant horse around the desert in a full metal jacket wasn’t the most effective or flexible means of desert warfare. 

I understand.  I get uncomfortable in phoenix riding around in a full suit of clothing. 

Last week I was in the glorious Holiday Inn at the Cincinnati airport.  I was out at dinner with the client and say myself next to their marketing person who I will be working with.  Come to find out she’s running her first 50K that weekend!  You can bet she regretted broaching the topic of endurance running with me!

You see, our tribe is everywhere, wandering over in deserts of Negev and over deserts in Hebron KY. 

Groan all you want.  I own the Dad jokes.

and I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

Direct download: epi4400.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:30pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-399 – The Mindful Runner

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4399.mp3]
Link epi4399.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello, my friends and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-399. 

This is Chris your host and today we are going get a bit emotional.  We are going to the dogs.  Our themes are Buddy the Wonder Dog and courage. 

One of our longtime friends Janet inquired how Buddy the old wonder dog is doing so today we are going to tell some Buddy stories. 

In the interview I invited Gary back on to talk about his new book on running.  I thought the timing was good with the holidays to give you another gift option!  What can you buy for runners that they won’t hate?  A book.  Lots of books on running. 

Gary has a dream job of writing about running for a living.  I would have to become independently wealthy to do that.  As it turns out words are cheap, in my experience.

I’m doing fine.  I haven’t made much weight loss progress but I’m eating healthier.  The weight will come off as I start building up miles in my spring campaign.

I’m working with Rachel to lose some weight and get my nutrition right.  It’s hard through the holidays but I’m giving myself a long runway into the spring so even with setbacks I can ease my way into a good race weight for Boston. 

And I’m working with Coach to build some strength.  My core is not as strong as I’d like.  My legs fatigue way faster than I think they should.  My aerobic fitness is good, but my legs can’t get near that aerobic barrier and hold it like they used to. 

I went to the PT to get his opinion and there’s nothing wrong with me per se I’m just getting old.  I’m healthy and not injured. 

With the shorter days I’ve been pushing my runs out into the evening.  I find this is a dead time for me anyhow.  I’m too mentally tired to do anything creative.  I find it nice and head-clearing to get out on the road in the cold and dark with my lights.  It’s peaceful. 

Sometimes the stars are out, or the moon and it’s quite pretty. 

Like I said, we are going to spend some time talking about my old running partner Buddy the Wonder Dog today.  He’s doing OK.  He’s here with me now, sleeping. 

The old saying is that you can’t teach and old dog new tricks. I beg to differ.  You can teach an old dog bad habits rather easily. 

Buddy has never been given human food.  We never fed him from the table or scraps. I never gave him anything I was eating and as a result he never learned how to beg.  You could eat, he wouldn’t bother you. 

As he’s gotten older I started to toss him a peanut now and then.  We let him have the morsels that fell on the floor and what have you.  I figured, hey, how long has he got left?  Let him live a little.  What’s the harm? 

Of course, now it doesn’t’ matter what I’m eating.  A soon as I sit on the couch his nose is 3 inches from my food staring intently.  And any time we’re in the kitchen he’s underfoot on scrap patrol. 

So, yes, you can teach an old dog bad habits. 

The same is probably true for humans.

On with the show.

 

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Buddy in old age- http://runrunlive.com/buddy-in-old-age

Voices of reason – the conversation

Gary Dudney

GARY DUDNEY has been publishing articles on running, trail running, and ultrarunning for the past 20 years. His work has appeared in all the major running magazines, such as Runner’s World, Running Times, Trailrunner, and Marathon & Beyond. For Ultrarunning magazine, considered the “voice of the sport” of ultra long distance running, he’s served as a regular columnist since 2008, and he has additionally supplied the magazine with dozens of uniquely quirky race reports.  Ideas for The Tao of Running were shaped by the 60 one hundred mile races he’s participated in and the almost two hundred other long distance races he’s completed. He holds a Master’s Degree from the University of Kansas in English Literature and his fiction credentials include stories in Boy’s Life magazine and in numerous literary magazines and one published novel, Cries-at-Moon of the Kitchi-Kit. His second book on the mental side of running, The Mindful Runner: Finding Your Inner Focus, was just released on November 1 of 2018.

Section two – Courage-

http://runrunlive.com/courage

Outro

Alright, I appreciate you sticking with me through the emotional journey of  Episode 4-3989of the RunRunLive Podcast I’m sure it took great courage on your part.    

I ran the Thanksgiving 5K with my daughter and a bunch of people from my running club.  I had a good time.  It’s always great to see friends and its always great to spend time with my kids. 

I also decided to stop stressing out about pace and time.  This is just about the only 5K I run each year so it bothers me if I don’t’ race well.  When we woke up before the race it was 9 degrees Fahrenheit, which is very cold for this early in the winter.  There was a nice little breeze too.  So itf you’re one of those softies who believe in windchill it would have felt about zero. 

There was no warming up.  I didn’t even bother.  I just went out at what felt like a good hard pace and tried to hold it.  I think I ended up with7:20’s, but who cares, right?

I’ve been trying to follow a good morning routine with stretching, meditation, reading and writing and it helps.  I haven’t made much progress on my new book about startup sales, ironically because the startup I’m in is keeping me uber stressed out and busy. 

Thanks for playing along.  Next episode will be our 400th official episode. I’ll have to think hard about what I want to do next. 

I decided to write that quick update on Buddy because I got an email from long time friend Janet inquiring for his health and wellbeing. 

Let me tell you my Buddy story of the week. 

Monday night I was getting ready to leave work.  It was after 6:30.  I had a need to pick up a bag of dog food, because we were almost at the bottom of the barrel.  This is ok, because the dog food store is on my way home. 

Then I realized I have forgotten to bring the 10% off coupon for said dog food that I received in the mail and was quite excited about.  I believe the coupon algorithm in the great coupon generating AI computer typically only sends coupons when you don’t need something.  So, the universe has made an error in my favor and I aim to take advantage of it.

I decide to go home first.  Which is not on my way.  But I can pick up the dog and take him to the pet store with me as an outing.  It’s one of the few places they allow dogs. 

As I leave work it is sluicing rain.  Again.  Rainiest month in history.  (Like a normal week in Seattle or London.) 

I get home and go to let Buddy out.  He’s been in the house all day.  He looks outside at the weather and digs in his heels.  “Like, it’s only been 8 hours, I can hold it.  I’m not going from warm bed to cold rain!” I push him out onto the wet front steps. 

I do some quick things around the house.  I grab the coupon off the fridge and retrieve him for the trip to the store. 

It’s still pouring rain.  I’m not dressed for it having just come from work. 

He digs in his heels as I try to load him into the truck.  Armful of wet dog into the seat. 

We drive off to the pet store to get the food.  It’s late.  No one is in the parking lot and the store is empty.  I unload the dog and lead him on the leash to the store.  He wants to wander around the parking lot and sniff everything.  It’s pouring rain, still. 

We enter the empty store and I lead him back to the section where his food bags are stacked.  Leaving a trail of wet footprints.  I have to keep pulling him away from all the interesting things to sniff on the way. 

I know to keep an eye on him because the pet store is full of pet smells.  There have been hundreds of other dogs in there getting groomed and trained and just wandering around.  I know if I don’t watch him, he may try to mark something.  It’s not that he has that bad habit, it’s just that his reptilian brain gets overwhelmed by the scent of other dogs.  For a dog nose that place must be the equivalent of technicolor. 

I find the food and sure enough as I’m hoisting a 30-pound bag up onto my shoulder one handed with the leash in the other hand, he starts peeing on the floor.  Dammit! I yank him away and go to check out. 

Now I have a moral decision to make.  A decision that requires courage.  Pretend it didn’t happen or confess to the young lady at the register.  And as I’m practicing doing things that scare me this month, I decide to come clean, so to speak. 

She says they have “Sanitary Stations” just for this and asks if I want her to clean it up or would I like to do it myself – with the clear emphasis on ‘do it yourself’. 

I grab a handful of paper towels from the sanitary station and the bottle of organic squirty stuff.  I mop up my friend the dog’s unfortunate leavings.  I have to make another trip to get more towels.  He was serious about his duties. 

When all is as clean as it’s going to get we wander back to the register to retrieve the big bag of food.  I ask her if most people just ignore it and leave.  She says that mostly happens with poop. 

Que the ominous foreshadowing.

We exit the building.  It is, impossibly, raining even harder and colder.  Me in my dress pants and shirt with a big bag of food balanced on my shoulder like a suburban lumberjack and the leash in the other hand. 

I decide to pause to let him sniff the pots outside the door.  I feel bad that I had to practice urinatus-interuptus on him in the store.  But he has other plans and begins to poop on the sidewalk in front of the store. 

I say ‘no’ and try to pull him away but he manages to leave a trail of breadcrumbs, so to speak across the parking lot. 

Eventually I wrangle him and the bag of food into the truck. 

Now I’m stuck in another moral conundrum, but since I’ve already got momentum, I grab a plastic bag (that I keep in the truck for these types of outings) and stoop amid the puddles to undo the poo. 

And that is my old Buddy story from this week. 

There is no moral to it, but I think I earned some karma. 

and I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

Direct download: epi4399.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:02pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-398 – Kat Comes Back  

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4398.mp3]
Link epi4398.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-398. 

I was on Facebook Messenger this week and realized there were unread messages in there.  Some several years old.  I’m not sure if this was an artifact of some server upgrade or from when they pulled Messenger out into a separate app, but If you sent me a Facebook message and didn’t’ hear back, I apologize. 

I usually respond to everything.  I like interacting. Hope I didn’t cause anyone to give up. 

Today we talk with Katrin who’s story I found in my Boston Marathon Training group.  Some interesting stories in there.  I wanted to talk to her because she was able to accomplish something I have never been able to.  She was able to race herself into the hospital. 

I don’t know about you, but I tend to give up way before I collapse on the course.  Don’t worry, it has a happy ending. 

In section one I’m going to explore the concept of mastery.  In section two I’m going to talk about happiness and purpose. 

I’ve been working on myself over the last couple weeks.  Not just physically but overall.  I’m working with Rachel on my nutrition, I’m doing some personal improvement work and I’ve got my morning routine going. 

I go through cycles and I was ready for a reboot. 

One of the things that popped up is I have another book in my mind that is begging to get out.  How blessed am I that these things just stand up and shout every now and then?

I’ve just started but the topic is going to be Startup Sales.  It’s going to be for the entrepreneur who has a  started a company, with a great idea and great promise but has to learn how to sell that idea and promise. 

This is my 3rd trip through the startup cycle and I think I could help a lot of people.  Not just the tactical ‘how to’ but the emotional wrapper that comes with navigating the choppy seas of a startup. 

Much like I combined the tactical practice of speedwork with the ability to mentally survive the dark places of an intense training campaign in MarathonBQ. 

I’m still in formulation mode, but if you have any good ideas or want to introduce me to a publisher or want to ride along as an editor or muse, let me know.

As you listen through today think about how you can focus on mastery and not just competence or getting by.  Listen to how Katrin was able to navigate the extreme learning of her two marathons. 

Think about what you love doing, what your purpose is and why you are here. 

And I’m glad you’re here. 

Brilliant!

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Mastery- http://runrunlive.com/mastery

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Katrin Maesse

My third marathon, two words: Boston Qualification!!!💙💛 The official finishing time was 3:28:50h, so much better than I thought it would be! Not sure if this will be really enough for Boston but for now I take it - happy and proud! 🎉
As usual, I went out too fast, so I took it easier after the first 17 miles. However, it was amazing from the start to the finish. I met super cool people to chat with, could motivate two guys not to walk but to stay with me for some miles, celebrated with the cheering crowed and loved to see my cheerleaders Christophand Donna along the course 😍26.2 miles of smiling! 
Right before mile 24 and again before mile 26 I had bad cramps and needed to stop to stretch my calves..I finished on cramping legs but I finished! I cried many happy tears, started smiling again and gave high fives to every single Marine I met on the way to my medal! 
Happy and proud of todays achievement! Like Adrianne would say: I can do hard things! ❤️

Section two – Happiness and Purpose-

http://runrunlive.com/the-pursuit-of-happiness-and-its-relationship-to-purpose

Outro

Thank you my friends for joining me for Episode 4-398 of the RunRunLive Podcast – were you able to collapse, recover and keep going? 

I’m still taking it relatively easy now.  I’m working with my nutrition coach Rachel to get healthy over the next few months (and of course lighter) so I can put a good training cycle in for the spring. 

I go through cycles of good nutrition and those typically last with some point adjustments for a couple years and then I need to get help again for a few months.  I’m definitely in the conscious competence Phase where I know what I’m supposed to do but have trouble executing. 

If anyone wants to work with Rachel, I’ll put her links in the show notes, or you can shoot me an email at cyktrussell at gmail dot com.  http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Next up for me is a Thanksgiving Day race that I run every year with my younger daughter.  I’m not expecting much but I’ll go give it a whirl, see my friends, have some fun. 

I’m a big consumer of podcasts.  Partly it’s my personality type where I just hate to waste time, so if I’m in my car or on the run I listen to podcasts.  I have smattering of business and pleasure and have gotten good at cycling on to new ones when I feel like it and ignoring old ones, otherwise the list of un-listened to podcasts will pile up and make you feel guilty.  It’s ok.  It’s ok.  Listen to what you like and dump what you don’t. You’re under no obligation. 

I don’t’ listen to those running podcasts where people just get on and talk while they run.  It’s just not interesting to me.  And I don’t feel like I get a lot out of the ‘how to’ running podcasts either. 

Here are a few episodes or podcasts that have stood out in the last few months.  I’ll try to link them in the notes.

First is a new podcast called Ultra running history by Davey Crockett.  Davey does a great job of producing a show.  It is well recorded with good audio and lots of sound effects and sound bites.  The history of ultra events is super interesting.  http://ultrarunninghistory.com/

Another show I have on my feed, like millions of other folks is Tim Ferris.  I would never say that a person as successful as Tim impresses me as a narcissistic ass most of the time, I would never say that, and I dislike the self-indulgent super long format, so I pick and choose based on the guest.  A recent episode #343 featured Seth Godin.  Seth is a wonderfully centered and mindful person.  That is a great listen.  https://tim.blog/2018/11/01/seth-godin-this-is-marketing/  https://tim.blog/2016/05/04/mike-rowe/

Since I’m a New England boy I have been listening to ‘Gladiator’ – by the Boston Globe which is a 6 part series on the rise and fall of Aaron Hernandez.  It’s super dark, but if you remember the murder trial and suicide of Hernandez you’ll be fascinated.   http://apps.bostonglobe.com/spotlight/gladiator/

Our friend Zen Runner is doing a new project called ‘Zen 2 Zion – Road to Ultra’ where he is training to run an ultra with his daughter.  It’s charming.  And Adam has always been a good podcaster.  http://adamtinkoff.com/

A good, short listen is ‘The Way Heard it’ by Mike Row of Dirty Jobs fame.  He’s a great story teller and these are good little bits of joyful story telling.  (by the way, Tim Ferris’ interview of Mike Rowe was really good too) http://mikerowe.com/podcast/

Lastly, before I move you to the exit, one of the shows I have on my feed is On Being by Krista Tippet.  I believe this is a public radio show as well.  She talks to authors, poets, philosophers and others about super deep woo woo stuff.  I don’t listen to all of them.  I choose a couple here and there that interest me. 

She recently did a show with Sally Kohn and Erik Erickson – called ‘Relationship Across Rupture’ which was really good.  I try to avoid politics, especially in the current political climate, I find it a waste of energy, but I found this almost a antidote for our current political emotions. 

She hold a forum with Sally Kohn who was the Lesbian liberal foil on Fox News for many years and Erik Erickson who is a conservative pundit and radio personality from Georgia. 

Instead of setting it up as your typical cable news cage match they explore all the things we have in common.  And at the end of the day you realize that we have 85% in common and only these few things that separate. 

That’s the great realization.  No matter who you are. When you look across the way at your supposed adversaries, they are not bad people.  They want what’s best of their family and their country, just like you do.  If you had dinned with them you would like each other, as people, not positions. 

The things that separate are small things that have been whipped into big things by people with agendas. We are better than that. 

I found it like a giant relief.  Almost life-affirming. 

So master a bit of listening and I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

Direct download: epi4398.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 10:10am EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-397 – Molly Lives  

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4397.mp3]
Link epi4397.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-397. 

How are we doing today?  Are you surprised to hear from me?  Well, I figured since I’ve been missing my publishing deadlines I’d make it a point to get this one out on time!

I had some plane time and had a lot to get out of my head around the Baystate marathon I just ran – so let’s celebrate abundance together. 

This one is going to be a bit of a gear change from last episodes’ rah-rah Boston qualification dialogue.  Today I reached out to my friend Molly who we’ve known from the on-line running community for a long time.  We ran the Mojo Loco in St. Louis together years ago.

The Mojo Loco movement was a thing started by Steve Runner of phedipidations fame where we would all get together in some city and run a relay race together.  No point other than just a bunch of runners from the online community getting together to meet in the protein form and hang out.  It was a great idea.  Someone should start that project again. 

I always follow Molly’s adventures online.  It’s a unique age where we all live out in public through social media.  Molly is always entertaining.  Ironically, I probably would have described her as ‘comically neurotic’.

And, I watched as she ran up against something that changed her life.  So, I wanted to talk to her about that and see what, if anything, we could profit from the conversation. 

To wrap up last weeks show, Jonathan ended up positively obliterating the Atlantic City Marathon with a 3:11 finish.  That’s the power of focus.  He went from a 3:54 to a 3:11 in about 24 months.  I just read today on social media that he’s gunning for a sub-3 finish next fall. 

My training partner Brian toughed out a 3:33 at Baystate to get his 2020 qualifier.  We had another long-time friend of the show finally get the sub-3:30 she’d been chasing for years at, I think Amsterdam.  Great examples of sticking with it and doing the work to get the goal. 

My race?  Well, you’ll have to listen to the race report I’m wrapping around this episode.

When you have a situation like Molly’s it clears away all the bullshit in your life.  It makes me ask the question why we can’t get this clarity until it is forced upon us by some crisis? 

We all have the power to do what we want, to do what is right and to do what makes us happy.  Why don’t we?

It’s because we are too busy trying to live the life that we think we are supposed to.  No one gave us a manual on how to live a healthy life.  The manual we got was to keep in line and do all the ‘right’ things and at some point the reward would come. 

It’s probably time to update the manual.  What I would add is…

Don’t wait until your name is called.  Don’t pretend to be happy living the life you think you’re supposed to live.  You only get this one life.  You only get this one now.  Respect yourself, accept yourself and do what YOU want to do. 

I don’t mean to go Tony Robbins on you, but unless you can come to grips with who you are and what you want the world is just going to spin by. 

So get busy with that, would ya?

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Baystate part 1- http://runrunlive.com/vapor-flys-and-dead-squirrels

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Molly Marco

Great links:

 

https://imermanangels.org

Imerman Angels

 

https://www.gildasclubdetroit.org

Gilda’s Club (Detroit— though they are in NY, LA, & others)

 

Look on Twitter for monthly chats regarding breast cancer & brain cancer, for example— using hashtags: #bcsm (breast cancer social media), #btsm (brain Tumor social media). 

 

There are great organizations, depending on the type of cancer— and usually some fun races!

 

I just did Head for the Cure 5K in Detroit last month— that one is great! Do some google searches and you can find some great organizations near you.

 

Section two – BayState part 2 - http://runrunlive.com/vapor-flys-and-dead-squirrels

Outro

Thank you my friends for joining me for Episode 4-397 of the RunRunLive Podcast unless you gave up halfway through, then you’re not here anymore. 

What am I going to do now?  I’m going to rest a bit.  Take some time off, gain some weight and get my head right, get my passion back.  Running, when you do it right is a clear a crisp beacon of passion.  When you do it wrong you get your ass kicked. 

I’ve got some fun races in the fall.  There’s the traditional Thanksgiving 5K in Ayer.  Then the Mill Cities Relay with my club.  And, of course, the last Sunday in December, the 30th, we will gather for the Groton Marathon, which is a made up race of any distance and any pace you want to run with me and my friends up in Groton Massachusetts – you can visit the website at grotonmarathon.com. Come up and play with us. 

Last weekend when I was in the pace pack people kept asking me how many marathons I’d run.  I didn’t know how to answer.  Do I count the ultras? Do I count those training runs that were longer than 26.2?  If that’s the case I think I ran 8 marathons over the summer!

I’m going to continue to count Groton. Even though it’s a made-up race.  Come up and join me.  We’ll jog a casual 4:00 hour marathon and tell tall tales. 

I told coach we have a full gym at the place I work now.  I told him he should teach me how to use the heavy bag because it always looks cool when people are kicking and punching it on TV!

Next summer I think I’ll do a mountain biking cycle, I miss it.  Find an epic race that rewards endurance and doesn’t penalize lack of skill. 

Before that I’ve got a qualified ticket to the 2019 Boston Marathon.  I haven’t requalified there since 2010.  Maybe that’s a worthy goal?

I have another trick for you when you are in uncomfortable situations where you feel like you have imposter syndrome.  This one is the ‘super-hero avatar’ trick.  It’s appropriate for Halloween.  Maybe I should have used it last Sunday!

The trick is to think of someone real or imagined who is fantastic in these situations.  They are the superhero of whatever this situation you are afraid of.

Picture them engaging the crowd, wowing the opposition, swaying everyone with their charisma and drive.  They are epitome of the pro you wish you were. 

Got that person in your head?  Got them visualized? 

Ok, now give them a name.  A cool name.  A superhero name.  Like “Crusher” or “T-Rex”.  Got it?

Ok now next time you go into a situation that scares you think about how Crusher or T-Rex would handle it.  Visualize what they would do.  Now put their avatar in front of you like a projection.  Even better step into that projection like putting on a costume. 

Live that situation through your super hero’s eyes and actions.  What would Crusher do in this situation?  What would T-rex do?

Try that.  It might not help, but it’s fun.

What the heck do you have to lose?  Life is short.  Live it like you mean it.

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Direct download: epi4397.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 1:15pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-396 – Jonathan – This is my Olympics!  

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4396.mp3]
Link epi4396.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-396.  This is your friend Chris.  How are we doing?  It’s marathon racing season.  We just had Chicago, New York is in a couple weeks and every weekend hosts a plethora of regional races in these few contiguous weeks. 

I myself am racing this Sunday at Baystate.  Jonathan, who we interview here today is racing at Atlantic City.  If you’ve been with the show long enough, you might remember I raced there a few years back as well.  It’s an interesting loop course that starts and finishes on the boardwalk.  If you’ve ever seen Boardwalk Empire on HBO that’s the boardwalk they’re talking about. 

Today’s show is about focus.  So far in this, I guess we might call it a series of themes, we looked at empowerment and then last week endurance.  This week’s theme is focus.  As we talk through Jonathan’s journey listen to the focus that he brings to his training and his goal.  He’s like a berserker warrior in his single-minded focus on this achievement and he’s been able to have some success with this element of his approach. 

So, obviously I’m going to tease apart the concept of focus in section two.  In section one I’m going to outline what I have learned over the years about how to take large chunks off your finishing time.  How to break plateaus, surprise yourself and get non-linear gains in performance.  (sounds like a new book).

I’m as ready as I’ll ever be for the Baystate marathon on Sunday.  I’m fit, I got some decent training in and I have not real injuries.  I’m still heavier than I’d like to be optimally, but I’m healthy. 

Looks like the weather is going to be decent but maybe a bit cold and a bit windy.  If it holds where it is it will be just about freezing at the start and there will be 10-15 mile per hour winds.  I’ve run this course n a windy day before and there are long stretches that are open to it. 

With the BAA lowering the qualification standards, (or raising them, depending on your point of view), the race moved all the pace groups up 5 minutes.  That makes it easy for me.  I’ll just attach myself to the back of the 3:30 pace group and chill out.  This is typically a pretty big pace group, at least for the first half, so I can stay out of the wind.  Just try to idle until we hit that final stretch across the river and see how I feel – either hang on or drive it home. 

I seems old-hat to say that we all get the same number of hours in the day.  But, focus is how you find the leverage in what you have to achieve a goal. 

Think of a magnifying glass.  Maybe when you were a kid you held that magnifying glass in your hand and noticed that the convex lens focused the light.  At a certain height and angle you found that focal point (or for our purposes ‘focus point’).  This focus point collected all the power of 3-4 inches of sun and condensed it to a point, that dot of light.

Then you discovered that this dot of light had the intensity to start fires in the dry leaves or fry unsuspecting insect life.  Through focus you were able to take the same patch of sunlight that might warm your face and create overwhelming energy at one point.

That’s the power of focus. 

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Big Chunks! - http://runrunlive.com/big-chunks

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Jonathan Lieberman

Just that I’ve reached low 180s lbs and will be attempting to BQ for 2020 on October 21 in Atlantic City! Thanks man! Here’s a pic from Philly RnR Half last week:

The (much) shorter answer to your question of “How do I do it” re: training is my mantra “This Is My Olympics” (which I of course forgot to mention🙄, if you want to include that in the show notes and/or title.

 

Section two – Focus - http://runrunlive.com/focus

Outro

Thank you my friends for joining me for Episode 4-396 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  Hopefully you wetre able to find the focus to stay with me.

The Baystate marathon is on Sunday.  I didn’t manage to get as light as I wanted, but I’m healthy and had a reasonable training cycle.  I did more speed work than coach normally gives me to get some leg speed to go with that aerobic fitness. 

That’s my challenge.  I’m fit enough to go the distance, but my legs are the constraint. 

It looks like the weather is going to be a bit chilly for the race, which is good for me.  I’d rather have the cold than the hot.  Like I said in the intro, my plan is to hang on to the back of the 3:30 pace group and see what I have in the high miles. 

I bought a month’s worth of meal planning from Rachel and coach.  The training site we use is called DailyFitBook.  That’s how I get my workouts.  For the last month I’ve gotten 3 recipes a day in my workouts which was cool. 

The meals are a lot more paleo type than I’m used to. But I have successfully learned to make frittata, and turkey burgers and I make a nice coleslaw now.  Real men make coleslaw, yeah?  These protein-heavy meals fill you up more and the rest of my family doesn’t hate them. 

One last though for you.  Do you ever suffer from imposter syndrome?  You know, you find yourself in a meeting or a situation and wonder “Holy cow, everyone is looking at me, counting on me, and who am I? I’m not good enough, smart enough, etc for this!  I’m a fake! What can I do so they don’t find me out?!”

I mean, obviously not me, I’m speaking for a friend…

A consequence of this kind of thought process is your inner turmoil, your inner noise, your inner insane dialogue gets so loud it crowds out everything else and you are immobilized just when you need to be a better version of yourself. 

Your inner insane dialog (which, by the way no one else is thinking except you), prevents you form rising to the very occasion that you are stressed about to begin with. 

Here’s what you can try.  Here are a couple tricks.  Before the next interaction do some prep.  Find a quiet place.  Relax.  Put yourself in a meditative state.  Quiet yourself.  Shush those voices. 

Picture your head as a big circle, like a pie chart.  Picture that pie chart as having two slices.  The first slice is red-orange and it is all the insane, negative, self-talk.  The other slice is your clear-thinking normal self. 

When you go into these stressful interactions the red-orange side of the pie chart grows until it crowds out the nice, blue-green, smart, well spoken slice.  And instead of paying attention and focusing on what you are delivering or what the other humans are saying, all your sanity gets crowded out and you don’t hear anything anyone else has to say.  It leaves you with only a tiny slice of your effective thinking to use.  This response basically disables you, and keeps you from being your best self in that situation. 

Instead, visualize the circle filling with tat blue-green rational thought.  Picture that red-orange dissolving.  If you can get good at this ‘in the moment’ you can catch yourself and refocus. 

No one else cares about the noise in your head.  Practice clearing that out and being present.

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Direct download: epi4396.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:13pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-395 – Karen - From the Brink to Boston

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4395.mp3]
Link epi4395.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-395. 

Today’s show is about endurance. Hopefully it will be available for you folks who are stepping into the Chicago marathon this weekend. Not that you would need a podcast to listen to at Chicago.  I mean, you’ve got 45,000 other runners to talk to.  You probably won’t catch Galen Rupp or Mo Farah.  You might be able to catch Joan Benoit Samuelsson, she’s going for the age group record as a 61 year old, but that’s doubtful as well.  Amy Cragg is out there with the elites as well. 

I hear the weather is going to be bad.  High winds and maybe some rain.  I remember joking after Boston this year that if they had that kind of weather in Chicago it would be the apocalypse.  Hopefully it won’t be too bad and it will give everyone something epic to talk about. 

Endurance is the theme today.  I talk with Karen who is a prime example of not giving up.  This is the second person this year who I have talked to with one of these incredible stories of rebirth. 

In section one I’ll give you a primer on Achilles tendinitis (I made a video for this one as well because the stretches are hard to explain without a visual) and in section two I’ll wax poetically about endurance. 

Since we last talked my training has run the gamut between horrible and wonderful.  Right after our last show I had to walk away from a long tempo run because I was just shot.   I was pretty down about it.  I don’t like giving up on workouts.  But I couldn’t hold the paces and my form was shot so I walked away 2 hours into a 3-hour workout. 

But since then I have had a couple really good workouts.  I’ve been doing a lot of speed work and my tempo paces have come down to encouraging levels.  I have been consistently holding paces in the 7:30’s on my long tempo and that bodes well for the upcoming marathon.

Some of you may have heard that you would have needed to beat your qualifying time by over 4 minutes this year to get into Boston.  As registration closed the BAA announced that for the 2020 race they are lowering all the standards by another 5 minutes.  For me that means I now need to run a 3:35 to make the standard, which is a hair over 8-minute miles. 

You may have gotten used to hearing my dog Buddy the border collie in the background of these recordings.  I had him into the vet last week for a check up.  He’s doing fine. He’ll be 15 in December. With the cooler fall weather he comes back to life and gets agitated. 

He can’t really run anymore.  His hips are pretty shot. He can still move well and isn’t in any discomfort.  He’s in great shape for his age, but, like me, he doesn’t realize how old he is.  Living an active life has probably given him an extra 2 years with us to enjoy. 

When I was walking down the sidewalk with him on the leash towards the vet a guy was unloading an old standard collie.  He had a ramp that he unfolded so the old collie could totter down out of his van.  This poor old thing could barely move. When he got the collie into the vet’s office he said ‘Don’t let him lie down or he won’t be able to get up.’

I asked the guy ‘How old?’.  Thinking this museum piece of a collie must be really old compared to Buddy.  The answer was 12.  Buddy was 2 years older than this poor old collie and trotting around like he owned the place, ready to go. 

So – there ya go – lead an active life and you’ll have a much higher quality of life in the later innings.

On with the Show.

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Achilles- http://runrunlive.com/achilles-primer

Voices of reason – the conversation

Karen Moore – From the Brink to Boston

Karen Moore‎ to Boston Marathon Training

September 17 at 11:19 PM · 

Everyone has a story. I have been a runner most of my adult life. Have done marathons all through the years. Two and a half years ago while out for my run I got hit by a hit and run driver. I was found along the road side by a amazing man. I was unconscious, major head trauma, leg broken in three places, multiple cuts, bruises. After a very long 8 months I started walking to get strong. Soon I was doing a limp like shuffle jog. It was ugly but it was a start. My daughter always wanted to run a marathon with me. I was not going to let this person who hit me take this from us. Lots of stubborn runners strength kept me going. Never would have guessed it but two years after I ran a marathon with my daughter and almost qualified. Two months later in Philly I did it. What the power of love can do. Can not believe it is real. Scared, proud. My daughter will be my cheer leader. Her goal is to qualify this year in philly. Someone wake me.

 —  feeling blessed.

Section two – Endurance - http://runrunlive.com/endurance

Outro

You know what I’m going to say, right?  Yup.  That’s it you have endured another episode of the RunRunLive Podcast.  That was number 4-395.   Episode 4-395 of the RunRunLive Podcast. 

I’m in my taper for Baystate.  It’s on the 21st.  I seem to have gotten enough speed back and am confident that I have an opportunity to beat that new 3:35 standard.  We’ll see.  All you can do is put yourself in position to race.  You get to the starting line and the universe takes care of the rest, right?

I have a tip for you.  When I first started running seriously I used to rely on a lot of sports drinks.  I used to power my runs with Gatorade and Power Bars.  But over the years I’ve come to find it easier, and heathier, to condition my body to run off its own fat stores with minimal intervention. 

I still use fuel in races but only enough to keep the fire lit, so to speak.  Regardless of the fueling product you are using what I have found is that the recommended dosage from the manufacturers is always too strong, at least for me.  This goes all the way back to when I ran on Gatorade.  Full strength Gatorade gave me stomach issues. 

My tip for you is to practice cutting what ever you’re using by half.  What ever it is.  If it says a scoop per bottle, just put in a ½ scoop.  This way it won’t impact your stomach.  You get used to it and you can meter your intake just as well with a lighter dose. 

Speaking of Buddy’s visit to the vet, I myself went to get a checkup.  I try to get in every year for a physical because I’m in that age group that gets some of those top ten diseases like prostate cancer and colon cancer.  It’s just good practice.

I hadn’t been in for a couple years because of different urgencies in my life so I figured I should.

No surprise I am boringly healthy.  My blood pressure is excellent.  My prostate is lovely.  It’s all good. 

I joke to my doctor that I am an exceedingly uninteresting patient, and he tells me that I make his job easy. 

Did you know that 75-80% of medical issues are lifestyle related?  The top 3 contributing lifestyle factors are of course diet, exercise and smoking. 

Pretty simple.  It’s a game where you know the rules and have an 80% chance of winning. 

What are you going to do with all that extra quality of life now that you know the secret?

Shal we find out together?

I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Direct download: epi4395.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 7:02pm EDT

Direct download: PublicServiceAnnnouncement.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:52am EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-394 – Liz runs on Venti

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4394.mp3]
Link epi4394.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-394. 

Today’s show is about empowerment.  There has been much ballyhoo around empowerment in the past few years, rightly so.  To my mind it is not about someone in charge, or society or culture stepping forward and blessing you with empowerment.  It is about you realizing that you have the strength, the gifts, the permission to be empowered.

Just like ‘inspired’ means to be filled with spirit, ‘empowered’ means to be given or gifted power.  What we’re going to realize is that we have the ability to give ourselves that gift. 

This is a big part of how a good coach, and a transition to an endurance lifestyle, can transform your mindset by giving you, or more appropriately, revealing to you your own infinite power. 

Today we have a chat with Liz, who is a runner, a coach and a mom.  Liz and I have spent some time running the roads of Groton together.  We talk about empowerment of her runners. 

In section one I’ll tell my Wapack Trail Race tail.  And in section two I’ll talk about…I’ll give you three guesses… That’s right Empowerment!

I’m ramping up my training for the Baystate Marathon in October.  Have been working on my speed and it’s awful but I’m getting the workouts done.  At least the weather is turning a bit cooler now up here so I can avoid the soupy heat and humidity. 

But the days are getting shorter in a hurry as well.  I’m doing some workouts at night in the dark.  I don’t mind, I’ve always been a night runner. 

I did a trail run one night last week and it was a clear moonless night.  Really pretty to be able to look up through the trees and see the stars splashed across the sky. 

As we move into fall the Concord grapes are ripening.  The sweet-sour smell hits you as you pass by.  They are screaming florid grape smells at you as if to say, “We’re still here! Your Vikings and colonials have come and gone, but we’re still here!” 

I have a key tip for you.  Something I learned from the 100 mile training.  When I run at night on the road I have always worn a headlamp.  I also try to wear something reflective or a blinky light on one arm. 

In Ultra-running you carry a flashlight as well.  Remember what generation I’m from.  When I think flashlight I think about those 8-inch long cylinders with multiple heavy D-cell batteries that at best gave off a wan yellow glow.  Think horror movie flashlight. 

When I started training overnights for the 100 I looked around for flashlights and discovered there is a whole new generation of cheap, bright, small, LED flashlights.  Companies give them away as marketing knickknacks. 

They are so small and light you can hold them between your fingers and not even notice them.  This way you don’t have to turn your head to illuminate something, you just point the flashlight at it.  When you’re running into oncoming traffic you can wave the light around in their frame of reference to make sure they see you. 

So, my friends, turn on your love light, and let it shine, shine, shine…

On with the show!

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

M

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  We do this by offering a membership option where members get Access to Exclusive Members Only audio and articles.

  • Member only race reports, essays and other bits just for you!

Links are in the show notes and at RunRunLive.com

Become a member

Section one – Wapack-2018 - http://runrunlive.com/wapack-2018

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Liz McHutcheon – Running on Venti

Instrgram @runningonventi

FB @runningonventi

Twitter @runningonventi

www.runningonventi.com

Things I like:

Lay’s Ruffle Potato Chips, New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs, Harry Potter Movie Marathons, travel and photography.

I’m a runner (especially love the trails), coach, writer, and former CPA who knows a few things about Quickbooks. I’m a mom to two amazing and sometimes pain in the butt daughters who have taught me more about myself then any book. I’ve lived in Ireland where I got engaged and married. I’m vegan and love all animals especially my two Golden Retrievers, Thor and Ginger and my three cats, Fluffy, Bailey and Paris.

I’m over 50 and I don’t let that number tell me what I can and can’t do. I’ve been to Paris more then any other city in the world besides Boston (where I live). I’m not afraid to try new things, go by myself to run the stairs at Harvard Stadium with November Project, go run a race alone in another state and listen to what my gut is telling me to do even if I’m not sure where my gut is taking me.

So why Running on Venti? I do love coffee but it is more than about the coffee. It’s about living your big, beautiful life and going after those BIG goals, one small and sometimes messy step at a time. Even when it’s scary. It’s jumping all the way in not just slowly getting used to the water.

My favorite coffee to order: Iced Venti Decaf Americano with extra ice and coconut milk.

Running Stats: 5K x lost count (PR 23:40), 10K x lost count (PR 54:35), 10 miler x 4 (PR 1:27), Half-Marathon x 7 (PR 1:49:11), Marathon x 3 (PR 4:51), 50K x 2 (PR 8:11).

Section two – Empowerment - http://runrunlive.com/empowerment

Outro

Thank you my friends for joining me for Episode 4-394 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  Do you feel empowered?

I’m training now for the Baystate marathon.  Putting in some road miles. I feel pretty good.

One thing I had taken my eye off of was my nutrition. I have been eating too much junk and drinking too much beer.  I started a new project with the goal of getting to the starting line of Baystate under 170 pounds.  I figure why waste this fitness I have by half-assing my preparation? 

I have a quick story about worms. 

I didn’t get much out of my garden this year.  The varmints ate all my tomatoes.  I didn’t get any squash and only a couple cucumbers.

But my kale was great this year.  For some reason the cabbage worms never showed up and I’ve been eating kale salads every day for a month. 

This week the worms have discovered my kale, not the cabbage worms, which are all green, the color of the plant, that makes them hard to clean off.  My wife the horticulturalist says these worms are Sod Worms.  They are green and brown with yellow and black stripes. 

They aren’t making a dent yet and they are easier to clean off because you can see them.  As the weather cools off they will be less active.  Hopefully I can still get my salads for a few more weeks, even if they have a bit of extra protein in them.

I also have a family of caterpillars chewing through my parsley.  They are those big striped worms that turn into beautiful butterflies.  The butterflies are like royal blue monarch butterflies.  I’m letting them eat the parsley.  Seems like the right thing to do.  Karma and all.

I was listening to some poets talking about how movement is an act of meditation or prayer.  You make yourself a vessel and allow power to come through you.  Whether you that is the power of god or the power of the universe that we share.  You are a doorway. 

Think of the relationship between movement and empowerment spiritually.  Moving through the stations of the cross.  Climbing the tower of a Buddhist monastery.   Each step is inserting a power (or a prayer) into the world.

Think about that the next time you’re out for a run.  Imagine you are a conduit for power and are injecting it into the world each time your foot rings the ground. 

Think about that.

And I’ll see you out there.

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Direct download: epi4394.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 9:07pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-393 – Gary and the Tao of Running

(Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4393.mp3]
Link epi4393.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Hello and welcome to the RunRunLive Podcast episode 4-393. 

Today’s show is about resilience.  That’s the theme.  It’s more than just stubbornness, or courage, or grit, (which is the popular term now).  It is about all those things and more. 

As endurance athletes and runners we have a front row seat to the practice of resilience across the arc of our lives.

Today we talk with Gary who I met at the Burning River 100.  He was selling copies of his book “the Tao of Running”.  I took his card, and we connected this past week to chat about how to practice this courage, and enjoy it, in our training and racing.

In section one I’ll talk about resilience in our running.  You can tell by now that I ‘v been thinking about this a lot.  Resilience is one of the keys to living a successful life, right?  In section two I’ll talk about an example of how to use resilience at work.

I am running the Wapack Trail 18 miler this weekend.  I’m looking forward to it.  I think I can carry the fitness I built up this summer into the race and do well.  It’s a funny thing when you look at an 18 mile technical mountain race as an easy race! 

Other than that I’ve been training away, trying to get some speed back.  Not that I ever had any real speed, it’s all relative. 

I registered for my 21st Boston Marathon this week.  I used my Baystate time from last year of 3:33:33, which would probably get me in under the cutoff.  I’m guessing the cutoff is going to creep again this year and move closer to 5 minutes under the standard.  But, since I have 10+ years in I get to register early and cut the line.  Technically I could get in with a 3:39:59. 

I can’t believe summer is almost over.  I hope yours has been splendid.  Mines been pretty good. 

I got to ride my motorcycle more than I have in years. I have a back-road route that I take to work and back.  I sometimes think that maybe an old guy like me should not be riding the motorcycle so much.  My reaction times probably aren’t what they used to be.  Getting into an accident with a car on a motorcycle typically doesn’t end well for the motorcyclist.

I’m basically a giant engine with a gas tank strapped to it traveling at high velocity. 

As anyone who rides a motorcycle knows, the first thing people do when they learn that you ride is tell you their worst motorcycle story.  That friend who got obliterated on the highway by a distracted driver.  Here’s a tip; that’s not the least bit helpful.  Don’t do that. 

On the back roads I’ve got different challenges than on the highway.  On a typical ride to or from work I’ll have one or two cars try to kill me.  But, I’m pretty good at seeing it coming so I avoid these inelastic interactions with the other commuters. As a bonus I get to shake my head at them and give them the ‘WTF” body language. 

Mostly it’s people pulling out.  They just don’t see bikes.  There’s also a fair amount of running stop signs and not using signals.  You scan the landscape ahead of you and watch you the oncoming traffic.  You can read the ‘body language’ of the cars.  You get good at predictive analytics. You see a situation developing and make sure you’re not there when they do that stupid thing.  It’s like a video game. 

One thing I’m seeing more of this year is people crossing the lines.  I know in Asia and certain metropolitan areas the lane lines are optional, but out where I live you’re supposed to stay on your side of the line.  I don’t know why you need to drive on my side of the road.  I see this behavior as a biker and runner too.  It’s probably distracted driving.  People are drifting all over the road. 

So, my friends, look twice, save a life.  Motorcycles are everywhere.  Relax.  There is no need to run that stop sign.  Tighten it up a bit and keep to your own side of the road.  We appreciate the effort.  Spread the love.

I’m going to keep riding my bike.  I always figured that’s how I’d meet my maker.  Being distracted by a pretty girl on the sidewalk and burying myself in the back of a stopped truck. 

But, I’m resilient.  Are you?

On with the show!</