The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-448 – Dave McGillivray Boston Marathon to Covid Vaccination

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4448.mp3]
Link epi4448.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-448 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  How we doin?  Here we are flipping the page to February of 2021.  How about that? 

Big news from my side of the world, that being New England, is the cold.  Cold, cold, cold.   It was zero degrees F this morning. 

I just got back from 7ish miles in the woods with Ollie.  We waited until after lunch and the temp came up over 20.  Nice day, sunny, windless, cold.  It’s really good running in the trials right now.  With the freeze, the ground is nice and hard. 

We got a couple of light snowstorms earlier in the week, maybe 3-5 inches of fluffy snow.  With so much traffic in the trails these days it’s all packed down and hard and fast.  It’s only icy where the spring come up. 

I had a pretty good week of running coming off the end of the infected toe.  The antibiotics cleared the infection up.  I took a bout a week off, but was back on it this week.  I bought some silicone toe caps,  toe protect that toe while it heals.  They work really well for me.  For some people they fall off, but for my big toe they fit great and keep the toe safe. 

I got back to training.  Had a pretty good weekend, despite the cold weather.  Friday I did a set of long hills in the cold, which were awful while I was doing them, but when I looked at the data were a decent effort. 

Yesterday I did a long 16 miler in the trails.  Most of it was pretty sucky, but that’s how ultra training is supposed to go.  You run until it sucks and then you run more.  That’s the name of the game.  And Ollie and I knocked out another 7 just now so that’s close to 30 miles in 3 days.  That’s encouraging. 

I didn’t take Ollie yesterday for the long run.  I thought it might be too cold for him.  I didn’t want to chance him hurting his feet.  For myself, I had to figure out how to carry water.  The challenge with this weather is that your bottles freeze in under an hour in any handheld. And the bite valves freeze even faster on your packs. 

What I ended up doing was wearing my Aonjiie vest with the two 500ML bite valve bottles under my outer layer.  I had my phone in an inner layer as well.  That worked well.  The bite valves didn’t freeze and I could unzip my outer layer to get a drink.  

I brought an old spring energy recovery gel from my ultra-bag; that bag where I keep all the ultra stuff, for fuel.  But when I opened it up at the halfway point it tasted like it had gone bad.  So – basically 3 hours in the cold with no fuel.  My balaclava froze to my head.   But I got it done and felt fine today. 

After the antibiotics and taking a week off I was noticeable chubby so I’ve been watching my food this week and have already knocked 5 pounds off. 

Today we chat with out old friend, director of the Boston Marathon, Dave McGillivray.  He is a case study in resilience and the power of a positive attitude.   This pandemic knocked his business of race directing right out from under him.  He had to pivot.  And he did.  He’s now running the vaccinations at Fenway and Gillette stadium.

Of course we also sneak in some Boston Marathon talk. 

In section one I’m going to talk about what to expect and how to counter the effects of aging as an athlete and in section two I’ll talk about work stress. 

Because I’ve had a really stressful week of work.   And I got through it.  Next week might be worse or better – but I’ll get through it. 

I try to show up with a positive attitude, have empathy and lead as best I can.  I also know I’m not going to get everything done and I make choices about what to not get done based on what’s important to me. 

Getting my workouts in is important to me. Writing and communicating is important to me. 

You, you’re important to me. 

We’re in this together right?  That’s what they keep telling me anyhow…

On with the show.

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – The Aging Athlete - http://runrunlive.com/the-aging-athlete

Voices of reason – the conversation

DAVE MCGILLIVRAY– DMSE Sports

 

https://www.dmsesports.com/about

 

WHEN DAVE MCGILLIVRAY FOUNDED DMSE SPORTS IN A MEDFORD, MA, STOREFRONT IN 1981, RUNNING WAS KNOWN AS JOGGING, WICKING MATERIAL WAS A TERRY CLOTH HEADBAND, AND SPORTS DRINKS AND RUNNING SHOES WERE IN THEIR INFANCY.

 

OUR MISSION

DMSE Sports is an industry leader in event management operations and logistics. From road races to charity walks, we pride ourselves on producing safe and technically excellent events by creating trusted relationships, paying attention to every detail, and executing flawlessly. DMSE strives to produce the highest-caliber experience, whether consulting on existing events or building and managing them from the ground up.

 

OUR COMMITMENT

Black Lives Matter.

 

We at DMSE Sports have always supported that sentiment internally, but stayed silent externally. However, we  want to be part of the change for good, and to do that, we recognize it’s necessary to speak out and stand in solidarity with those who are fighting for equality and racial justice.

 

It’s time we become better allies. To externalize our internal anti-racist beliefs, to learn from those who have lived the experiences, to listen when they point to injustices and prejudice. Black and brown lives matter, and they deserve to have an equal opportunity for happiness, success, and long life.

 

As a start, we will be donating all funds raised by the DMSE Foundation during the Medford2Medford race to organizations that directly support communities of color.

 

This is just the beginning of DMSE's effort to effect real change. We know we have a long road ahead.

 

OUR EVENTS

The company and its 75+ consultants manage more than 30 major road races and charitable events per year, including:

 

New Balance Falmouth Road Race

 

Eversource Walk for Boston Children’s Hospital

 

Camp Harborview Citython 5K

 

Run to Home Base

 

Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk

 

Delta Dental Mount Washington Road Race

 

BAA Half-Marathon

 

BAA Boston Marathon

 

lululemon San Diego 10K

 

TD Beach to Beacon

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon

 

BAA 5K

 

Feaster Five Thanksgiving Day Run

 

Harvard Pilgrim Finish at the Fifty at Patriot Place

 

BAA 10K

 

“There are 3 rules I never break—No questions asked. 1) Call my mom back within an hour. 2) Tell someone every day that I love them. 3) Always say yes to Dave McGillivray.”

— DAVID BROWN, CHIEF ADVANCEMENT OFFICER OF THE MASSACHUSETTS ASSOCIATION FOR THE BLIND & VISUALLY IMPAIRED

THE EARLY YEARS

Since 1981, DMSE has organized or consulted on more than 1,000 events, raising millions for charity and earning a reputation as one of the most thorough, well organized race management firms in the U.S.

 

DMSE’s first event – the Bay State Triathlon at Wright’s Pond in Medford, Mass. – attracted 100 participants and was one of the first triathlons ever held in New England and the nation. McGillivray had competed in the 1980 Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii and brought the concept back to his native Northeast. A triathlete for years, McGillivray competed in eight Ironman triathlons and introduced the inspirational father-son team of Rick and Dick Hoyt to the sport. In January of 2011, he was inducted into the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame.

 

Triathlons were just the beginning for DMSE. As the group organized more athletic events, McGillivray and his staff quickly earned a reputation as detail minded, safety oriented and creative thinkers in the competitive arena of event management. In 1988, the B.A.A Boston Marathon noticed and appointed McGillivray technical director of the world-famous marathon, and in 2001 he was appointed race director – a title he still holds today.

 

PICKING UP SPEED

As DMSE grew, McGillivray added to his team, hand picking the best in start and finish line management, lead vehicle programs, runner registration and results, while working with local volunteers, race committees and police and fire departments to create a smooth operation come race day. So when Olympic Gold Medalist Joan Benoit Samuelson had an idea for a road race in her hometown of Cape Elizabeth, Maine, she reached out to McGillivray and his team.  The TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K was launched in 1998 and is now among the most popular on the U.S. road race circuit, attracting some of the world’s fastest elite athletes and drawing rave reviews from participants.

 

Others noticed as well. From the Bellin Run in Green Bay, Wisconsin and the Lady Speed Stick® Women's Half Marathon Series throughout the U.S. to Run to Home Base at Fenway Park and Run For The Dream in Williamsburg, Va., a DMSE race is known for being safe, organized, technically advanced and produced without flaws. No wonder that in 2000, McGillivray and his team received the prestigious Race Director of the Year award from Road Race Management. 

 

MAINTAINING THE PACE

In 2014, DMSE added another high-profile event to the portfolio as the team was brought on to manage the Across the Bay 10K in Annapolis, MD, which has had more than 20,000 runners in each of the first two years!

 

PHILANTHROPY

DMSE Sports also is a pioneer in what is now one of the most important aspects of the athletic industry – combining athletics with philanthropy. Nearly every DMSE endeavor has that unbeatable combination of fitness and fundraising, giving back to the Jimmy Fund and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, Lazarus House and many others.

 

MILESTONES

DMSE has been involved with more than 900 major events over the 30+years, but here are a few highlights:

 

1980 Dave McGillivray Running and Sports Center opens in Medford, Massachusetts

 

1981 Dave McGillivray Sports Enterprises (DMSE) is born, sets up offices in Medford

 

1982 DMSE directs first triathlon, the Bay State Triathlon at Spot Pond in Medford

 

1983 DMSE produces Cape Cod Endurance Triathlon, first Ironman-distance triathlon in the continental U.S.

 

1984 Dave McGillivray Sports Enterprises, Inc. is incorporated, April 19, 1984

 

1988 DMSE is hired as the Technical Coordinator of the BAA Boston Marathon.

 

1989 DMSE manages Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk

 

1990 DMSE directs the Triathlon World Championship at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida

 

1993 DMSE manages Feaster Five Thanksgiving Day Road Race in Andover, Massachusetts

 

1996 DMSE assists with 100th running of the B.A.A. Boston Marathon with a record 38,000+ official entrants

 

1996 DMSE consultants hired to assist with venue management of all road events for Atlanta Olympic Games

 

1998 DMSE directs Goodwill Games Triathlon in New York City

 

1998 DMSE asked by Olympic Gold Medalist Joan Samuelson to manage the first TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K (then the People Beach to Beacon 10K)

 

2003 DMSE creates its own foundation: The DMSE Children’s Fitness Foundation

 

2004 DMSE manages USA Women’s Marathon Olympic Trials in St. Louis

 

2008 DMSE assists BAA in managing USA Women’s Marathon Olympic Trial in Boston, Massachusetts

 

2010 DMSE launches four new races – Spring Training 10K Classic in Jupiter, Florida; Run to Home Base at Fenway Park in Boston; Harvard Pilgrim 10K at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough; and the Run Gloucester 7-Mile Race in Gloucester

 

2010 DMSE Foundation launches “Running in Places” program for Boston-area school children

 

2010 DMSE hired as consultant to the Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon

 

2010 DMSE hired to manage 2011 Run for the Dream half marathon in Williamsburg, Virginia, and 2011 Mt. Washington Road Race

 

2011 DMSE celebrates "30 Years Running" March 12 with more than 450 dignitaries, consultants, and athletes; DMSE hired to serve as the race director of the New Balance Falmouth Road Race in Cape Cod in time for its 40th running

 

2013 DMSE manages the 25th Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk

 

2014 DMSE assists with the Across the Bay 10K in Annapolis, Maryland

 

2015 DMSE hired to direct the USA Invitational Half Marathon in San Diego, California

 

2016 DMSE manages the Runner's World Half & Festival in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

 

2017 DMSE celebrates 20 years of managing the TD Beach to Beacon in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

 

2017 DMSE hired to manage the inaugural Fenway Park Marathon

 

Section two – Managing Work Stress - http://runrunlive.com/surviving-work-stress

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have lined up in the parking lot between the barriers to get our shots through the end of  Episode 4-448 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  

So I watched “the Dig’ on Netflix.  I’ve been excited to see it.  Because I’m a big history buff.  And if you don’t know ‘the Dig’ is a period piece about the excavation of an Anglo Saxon ship burial in Sutton Hoo, on the coast of Suffolk in England.   

I won’t disparage the program but I was hoping for some archaeology and it turns out it’s more like ‘the English Patient’.  Lots of feelings and relationships and very little actual Anglo Saxon.   They don’t even show the helmet or mention king Raedwald.  So if you like British period dramas go for it.  If you like archeology, not so much.

The other wonderful discovery I’ve made in the last couple weeks are some very entertaining science fiction podcasts. Since I have my own “After the Apocalypse” podcast now – which you should go like and comment remember – I did some searching and found some others to listen too. 

There are three I’ve been listening to on my runs.  The first is Asimov’s Science fiction podcast that reads stories form Asimov’s magazine.  The second is Light Speed Podcast, another science fiction story podcast.  And finally my favorite is Clarkesworld science fiction.  I think I like that one the most because the editor always sounds exhausted.  <Links in the notes. >

They are all nice, little 20-30 minute chunk-size stories.  Perfect company for running in the dark, snowy trails.  Some are better than others.  The good ones make the so-so ones worth it. 

Other than that I’m working my way through a Jimmy Buffet novel called “A Salty Patch of Land” which is refreshingly easy to digest.  A bit of a palette cleanser – so to speak.  Cowboys, boats, lighthouses – typically breezy Jimmy Buffet style.  Cringe-worthy at time but unapologetic.

And that’s what I have for you this week. A decent week.  The days are getting longer fast now.  4+ minutes a day.  The vaccinations are rolling out.  We might even be getting on airplanes and gettiggn back out into the world soon. 

Stay warm.  Stay strong.  Be a leader,

And I’ll see you out there.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4448.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 6:21pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-447 – Mental Health in Lockdown – Dr. Sarb

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4447.mp3]
Link epi4447.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-447 of the RunRunLive podcast.   Here we are, the middle of January and I’ve got a lot to talk about today.  Which is good, because one of the things that bothers me about house arrest is that I don’t get enough experiential input.  I’m not out traveling and running races so I have less input, less to talk about. 

I had to take a week off from running last week.  I managed to give myself an infected toe.  I’ll talk about that in Section One.  It’s better now and I went out for an hour in the trails yesterday.  It seems to be ok.  I’m a week into a course of antibiotics and that seems to have cleared it up. 

The good news is that I’m not going to die a slow painful death from gangrene.  The bad news is that I lost a week of training and I had to take a course of antibiotics.  I don’t like taking antibiotics.  IT wipes out all the helpful and friendly bacteria in your body as well as the cantankerous buggers living in your cuticles. 

The antibiotics mess up my digestion, especially with my diet that includes a lot of roughage.  It basically gives me the digestive system of a Canadian goose.  It also compounds the dry skin I get this time of year.  I think in general we underestimate all the helpful things that a community of symbiotic bacteria do for you. 

Today we’re going to talk to Dr. Sarb. I’ve ‘known’ Dr. Sarb for many years from the online running community. He’s a New Zeeland based psychologist and is just now putting out a book about how to survive the Covid.  I had some tech problems and had to cut him short so I had him send me a preamble which I’ll stick on the front of the interview. 

By the way why is it called New Zeeland?  Doesn’t that imply an Old Zeeland? Isn’t this a British colony? Zeeland isn’t very British. 

In fact the is an old Zeeland and it’s north of Amsterdam in the Netherlands.  The first people to ‘discover’ what would become New Zeeland were Dutch.  Specifically a dude named Abel Tasman.  Yup, that’s how you get Tasmania.  At the time he thought he had run into Argentina.  His GPS must not have been charged. 

Anyhow, subsequently the Dutch thought, hey, this place is made up of islands like Zeeland, which in old Dutch means “Sea Land” and so you have New Zeeland. 

 

In section two I’ll talk about living life like it’s improvisational art. 

At the risk of being the crazy old etymologist, I want you to think about the word ‘compassion’.  It’s a good old Latin word.  The first bit means ‘with’ the second bit means ‘suffering’.  Having compassion means the ability to understand and feel another’s pain and suffering. 

“With Suffering”.  At this point most writers will go off on a screed about how you have to suffer for what you want.  How passion is the ability to suffer for a goal. 

I’m not going to do that, although it’s a great screed.  Very biblical.  Has the smell of ancient empires and codes of honor to it.  Unsurprising it’s Roman in origin. 

I’m going to talk about having compassion for someone else.  Understanding and appreciating someone else’s suffering.   If you think about anyone you know, live with or work with – to some extent they are all suffering.  Whether they show it or not. 

And the ones that are suffering the most are the one’s that are the hardest to have empathy for.  Because they are typically externalizing that suffering in ways that are negative. 

It doesn’t mean you have to agree with them. It doesn’t mean you have to like them.  It doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be held accountable.  It means you understand their suffering. 

This is important because people who are suffering tend to externalize that suffering.  They lash out.  They act out. 

It is in our nature to suffer.  It is in our nature to be passionate.  It makes us human. 

Passion by it’s nature is irreconcilable with the norm.  Passionate people are outliers in one way or another. 

If you can bring yourself to look for the suffering behind another’s actions it will help you understand them.  It will help your own suffering because it will allow you to understand.  Understanding converts emotion to reason. 

And with that reason you are in a better position to deal with those who are suffering. 

But compassion also means celebrating those who are achieving happiness.  It is part of empathy and growth. 

When was the last time you told someone you were happy for them? Try saying this in a moment of contemplation while visualizing someone you know who has achieved something that has made them happy.

Because that empathy for others happiness begets joy in yourself.

Now try saying this: "May I have appreciation for my own joy. May my happiness grow." And notice how that makes you feel and how the two are intertwined. 

On with the show!

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – The infected Toe - http://runrunlive.com/the-infected-toe

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Dr. Sarb Johal  – Mental Health in Covid

https://sarbjohal.com/about/

 https://sarbjohal.com/book/

 

I’m Dr Sarb Johal.

I’m a clinical psychologist, consultant, speaker, and media commentator with an insatiable curiosity about this human experience.

 

Over my 30-year career in psychology, I’ve been privileged to work alongside many brilliant minds producing phenomenal psychological research into the way our brains work.

 

The problem is that very little of this incredible work filters down in a useful way to the people it could really help. Ordinary people trying to sustain relationships, bring up kids, hold down a job, lead a team or an organisation, make a contribution and generally do life well. In other words, all of us.

 

Until now.

Through my videos, podcasts, consulting and speaking, I uncover and interpret the latest psychological research from experts around the globe, transforming complex concepts into useful insights that help individuals, leaders and organisations navigate this ever-changing world.

 

Section two – Life as Improv - http://runrunlive.com/life-is-performance-art

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have holed up in our home offices for almost an entire year, and most certainly,  through the end of Episode 4-447 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  

I’ve got a couple stories for you to take you out, but first remember to go listen to my new podcast the apocalypse serial “After the Apocalypse”.  Like it, write a review, forward it to your friends and share it on social, please. 

It was a busy week back at work.  This seemed to be the week when everyone showed back up from vacation looking to get stuff done. Since I wasn’t running it was weirdly ok because I had one less thing to do.  I’ve been at this new job for a year now, so I guess I have to stop calling it a new job.  I’m grateful to have made the decision to move back into a bigger company. 

Doesn’t’ look like we’ll be getting out of lock down any time soon.  I’m eyeballing a April event but not sure I’ll want to get on a plane and not sure I’ll be able to visit the home office.  I’m also feeling a weird “maybe I don’t have what it takes to run an ultra anymore” feeling.  I only made it through a  week of heavier training before I broke myself this time.

I guess I’m feeling a bit mortal which isn’t a great feeling.  Maybe it has something to do with the psychology of the Apocalypse. 

Ironically my new pair of Hokas showed up the same day I had to go to the clinic for the infected toe.  I down graded to the Challenger ATR’s from the SpeedGoat’s. I just can’t stomach paying $180 for a pair of shoes.  These new Challengers seem much lighter than the older versions.  The outsole seems stiffer too.  And of course the toe-box is a bit roomier!

I did end up partially breaking those $30 UBI Bluetooth headphones.  I say partially, because the left ear still works, which is actually ok for podcasts.  Might be a million dollar idea there folks – make an athletic version of those single ear-piece Bluetooth headphones. 

Let me take you out with a home-office story.  And it might be a little unsettling for those of you with an aversion to rodents.  So there are mousetraps involved, if that’s triggering for you, you might want to skip ahead. 

One of the mornings this week I carry my coffee and avocado toast up to my office to read the news on my computer, like I do most mornings.  I notice, what I think are sesame seeds from the toast on the pad in front of the keyboard.  And I almost drop them into my avocado, before I realize they are mouse turds. 

It’s been a low-mouse invasion year because we got the new garage doors in December.  But I left them open last weekend whilst clearing snow.  (how many people do you know that use the word ‘Whilst’?)

Anyhow, I think “crap, there’s a mouse living in my office crawling around on my desk eating my breakfast crumbs. 

So, I set a couple traps along the baseboard and kept my day going.

Then my big-boss calls, can you be on this call in 15 minutes where the corporate blah, blah, is talking about blah, blah.  OK, I can do that, luckily I’m showered and dressed at this point. 

So I’m at my stand up desk, on the video call, acting like I have some sort of intelligence, knowledge and authority – when ‘Snap!’ the trap goes off about a foot and a half from where I’m standing.  But, it doesn’t kill the mouse right away. 

So, I’m stuck talking to these people on this video call while the mouse is thrashing about on the floor next to me.   They never knew. 

Say what you want about this remote work, it comes with new experiences. 

I think the biggest challenge of extended home arrest is the sameness of it.  The ground-hog day nature of it.  But that can be comforting too.   It can lead you to feel uninspired and pointless.  And when that happens I think we just have to keep moving.  Like Dr. Sarb suggests you have to make up rules that simplify things for your over-taxed brain. 

One I’ve found useful is to commit blocks of time.  30 minutes is a good block of time when you’re having trouble focusing.  Shift the focus from, “I need to do this thing” to I’m going to work on this one task for 30 minutes non-stop.  The old Pomadoro Method.  Adds structure. 

I’ve rejoined Twitter after a few years away.  As always I’m cyktrussell.  I’ve got about 13,000 followers.  I tweet about running stuff.  I retweet from the back-catalogue of 1,000 plus articles I’ve written on my website RunRunLive.com.  I mostly make snide comments and tweet Grateful Dead Lyrics. 

Follow me and we’ll exchange snark.

Ok my friends, whether you feel like a Rockstar or the mouse, let’s make 2021 the best year yet by showing up and doing the work and bringing the joy.

And, hopefully,  I will see you out there.

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4447.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 8:47pm EDT

The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-446 – Running the World with Nick Butter

 (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4446.mp3]
Link epi4446.mp3

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Intro:

Hello and welcome to episode 4-446 of the RunRunLive podcast. 

Here we are at the start of a new year!  How about that?  2021.  Happy new year.

Today we have a chat with Nick Butter that I recorded a couple weeks ago.  Nick has recently run a marathon in every country in the world, so you may hear him making the rounds of the podcasts.  I’m always a little hesitant to interview folks that come off on the surface as a bit self-promotional. 

But, as you’ll hear in the interview, Nick is a thoughtful, honest runner.  It’s another one of these stories that’s good for the new year.  Another, chuck everything and do something big, story.  

I’m looking out the window of my home office as I write this and it is just about freezing.  There is a covering of icy snow on the ground.  Yesterday we got one of those slush storms where it’s warmish and snowing and raining at the same time.  I went out with Ollie for a couple hours in the slush in the trails which was fun.

I told you about how Ollie likes to ambush me.  He’ll come running directly at me, hit the brakes, snap and growl and take off growling with a stick.  I have managed to avoid getting bitten since we last talked.  (Although, he did spear me from behind with a pine tree one day this week.)   

So, yesterday we’re out running in the slush and he comes tearing down the trail straight at me, throws on the brakes, but because there’s two inches of slush, he can’t get any traction and slides straight through me like a ball through a bowling pin.  I went down on top of him and got nice an slushy. 

I know sounds funny now, but I was pretty mad at the time. 

Now all the slush is frozen.  It’s going to be dicey out in the trails today. My shoes are wet from yesterday so I’ll have to switch to an old pair. 

I’ve started training a bit.  My plan is to be in 50 mile shape for the end of April.  Today will cap a pretty big week for me.   Ran a ½ marathon on the roads with the club on Sunday, 7ish in the trails Tuesday, 8ish in the trails Wednesday, a 10 X 60 second hill repeat set on Friday, 10ish slush miles yesterday and I’ll get another 7ish trail mile in today – so mid 40 miles for the 7 days and over 50 for 8 days. 

In section one we’ll talk about how to build a spring training plan.  In section two I’ll give you one of the finished episodes of my new apocalypse podcast – so you can hear what I’ve been putting my energy into over the last couple weeks.

 

I’m not going to talk about New Year’s resolutions.  But I will talk a little bit about attitude in the outro. 

I thin 2021 is going to be a interesting year.  After all of use being artificially tamped down for 2020, 2021 should be a barn-burner!

I would counsel you to be prepared.  To take these slow times around the holidays to plan and reflect.  Because every thing that happens is an opportunity.  The failures as well as the successes teach us something – if we’re willing to learn.

I’ve often quoted Teddy Roosevelt’s “Man in the Arena” speech.  You’ve heard it.  It’s famous.  Teddy Roosevelt was a real character.  He’s on Mount Rushmore with Lincoln, Washington and Jefferson.  Which is a bit strange if you think about it. What’s this dude from the early 1900’s doing up on the mountain with the founders and the great emancipator?

This little squirrelly guy with the squeaky voice.  We know he had a squeaky voice because this was around the time that audio recordings started to be made. 

You know how Teddy got to be president?  He was such a pain in the ass they made him Vice President to get him out of the way.  Basically, they buried him in a do-nothing job so he couldn’t cause any trouble. 

Then an anarchist put a bullet in McKinley and the rest is history. 

You have to be ready for your moments.  2021 could be your moment.

On with the show!

About Zero

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations)

http://support.zerocancer.org/goto/RunRunLive

I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.

 

The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported. 

Become a member

Section one – 2021 training plans - http://runrunlive.com/spring-2021-training-plans-start-your-engines

 

Voices of reason – the conversation

Nick Butter  – Every Country in the World

Yasmin Li

Manager to Nick Butter

Contact number: +44 7772 870069

Sponsorships and Partnerships email: management@nickbutter.com

Speaking Events email: speakerbookings@nickbutter.com

--

Nick Butter

British Endurance Athlete | Motivational Speaker | Adventurer

Contact number: +44 7745 291591

nick@nickbutter.co.uk | www.nickbutter.com | www.runningtheworld196.com

Twitter and Instagram: @nickbutterrun

Expedition Highlight Reel: https://vimeo.com/368565548/b64acede4d 

PRE-ORDER NICK'S BOOK - Running The World: My World-Record Breaking Adventure to Run a Marathon in Every Country on Earth

Waterstones - https://bit.ly/2Ql9dor

Amazon - https://amzn.to/355fada

 

 

Section two – after the Apocalypse - http://www.aftertheapocalypse.me

 

 

Outro

Ok my friends we have run a marathon in every country, on every grain of sand in the world, through the end of Episode 4-445 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  You think we’ll live long enough to see some folks run marathons on other worlds?  

So that’s my new apocalypse podcast.  Go find by searching for after the apocalypse on iTunes or whatever your favorite podcast app is.  This one cost me real money to make so I need to drive the download numbers.  Even if you hate it and want to have nothing to do with it, go out a subscribe to it and download it. If you want to help, like it, write a review send it to a couple friends. I’m enjoying the creative process. 

Thoughts on 2020

Many people are saying 2020 was a ‘bad’ year.  I’m not sure there is such a thing as a bad year.  Labeling anything good or bad is just way to justify our own response to it.  And that’s the interesting thing about it – because our response is the only thing we can really control. 

When we say 2020 was a bad year what we’re really saying is 2020 was a year in which our response to external events was bad. 

What would change if instead of labeling ‘good’ or ‘bad’ we just took things for what they were?  2020 wasn’t ‘good’ or ‘bad’ it just was. 

2020 was certainly different. It caused an abrupt cessation or change to many of our longstanding routines and habits.  I would wager that with every routine lost, the seed of a new routine was planted.

People stopped driving to work.  That routine was lost.  Maybe it was replaced with going for a walk before work in the morning, with the dog or the spouse.  Was that a good or a bad change?

Surely, we lost people with the virus.  Surely, we lost jobs.  But are we not the type of animals that respond to challenges and change?  Doesn’t this type of abrupt, structural change cause us to look deeply inwards and ask better questions? 

One thing became clear to me in 2020.  There are an infinite number of things that are out of my control.  And if I let those things bother me or control me or chew up my valuable time then I’m a chump. 

There are things that are squarely in my control.  Where I spend my precious energy and time is under my control.  Somewhat, I’m still boxed in on many fronts by the decisions I’ve made along the way.  But that doesn’t mean I have to acquiesce.  That just means I choose to.  Call it sunk cost or pain avoidance but there are certain things I’m locked into, and I chose to be locked into. 

A big, big, big thing that is under my control is how I show up.  Everything in life rewards you disproportionately for how you show up.  To quote a famous fantasy novel, “We reap what we sow.” This is typically applied to the actions of individuals, but I think it applies better to how we show up.

If we show p with hate and anger, then we are going to reap hate and anger.

If we show up with fear and hesitancy, then we are going to reap suspicion and distrust.

If we show up with disinterest and torpor, we are going to be shown the door.

But, my friends, it is totally under your control. 

If we show up with energy and positivity and a belief in the future and a story about a better place, then we are going to reap the enthusiasm and trust of everyone we meet. 

And with that we bid goodbye to 2020.  2020 was a game-changing year.  2020 enabled me to spend time at home with my new dog and my old wife.  2020 gave me space to explore the trails.  2020 allowed me to inject some new creativity into my life. 

2020 brought perspective to where I am and where I’m going.

2020 reminded me of the things I’m grateful for. 

2020 started with me taking on the challenge of a new job.  I feel quite blessed looking back that I was able to be part of an organization and help navigate these unchartered waters.  That, I think, was a serendipitous use of my experience and mindset. 

In 2021 I vow to set new goals in all the important areas of my life.  To plan and execute to the best of my abilities.  But, most of all to show up.  To bring my best self to every day. 

And I will see you out there!

http://www.thenays.com/home.htm

MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - http://www.marathonbq.com/qualify-for-the-boston-marathon-in-14-weeks/

Http://www.marathonbq.com

http://runrunlive.com/my-books

Rachel -> http://www.nextlevelnutrition.fitness/contact-appointment/

Coach Jeff -> https://dailyfitbook.com/

 

Direct download: epi4446.mp3
Category:Running -- posted at: 5:22pm EDT



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